Flowring Pear, Callery Pear

Pyrus calleryana

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Pyrus (PY-russ) (Info)
Species: calleryana (kal-lee-ree-AH-nuh) (Info)



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)


Unknown - Tell us


USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade


Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring



Good Fall Color

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:


Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

New Market, Alabama

Daytona Beach, Florida

Troup, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:


On Sep 11, 2015, Scribbles646 from Troup, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

Very resistant to fire blight, hard wood, adaptable to poor soils including clay, most wild specimens have long thorns. Source of food for wildlife. Branching angles are variable between specimens but most of the ones near me have great wide angles.
For cultivated specimens it is essential that the trees are properly pruned early in life to prevent splitting as they grow older, they should be trained with a central leader system, only allowing one branch at any particular height along the trunk, otherwise there is too much strain on the main trunk as the branches get thicker and you end up with splitting. When properly pruned as a young tree they can certainly surpass the typical lifespan of a poorly maintained tree of the same species.


On Apr 4, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

I concluded that this tree is an inferior ornamental long before I found out that it's also commonly invasive.

The lifespan of a callery pear is typically 10-15 years, with luck perhaps 20. (Dirr) I can't count the number of callery pears I've seen split and disintegrate before reaching maturity, because the tree's architecture can't support its own weight, especially in windy, snowy, or icy weather. Since 'Bradford', many cultivars have been released which are claimed to have stronger architecture, but they all have this propensity to splitting, and in the landscape I still see few surviving into maturity.

The flowers are pretty and very early, but they have a powerful pervasive stink.

The foliage is attractive and rarely troubled by disease. F... read more


On Mar 13, 2005, nick89 from Tallahassee, FL (Zone 8b) wrote:

The wild form of the familiar Bradford pear. Birds relish the tiny pears and spread it far and wide. Bradford stock eventually reverts back to this type. This species is naturalized and abundant in north Alabama. Since it lacks the narrow branch crotch angles of the Bradford, it makes a better shade tree. The crown is rounded to spreading in older specimens.