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PlantFiles: Flowring Pear, Callery Pear
Pyrus calleryana

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Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Pyrus (PY-russ) (Info)
Species: calleryana (kal-lee-ree-AH-nuh) (Info)

3 members have or want this plant for trade.

Category:
Trees

Height:
20-30 ft. (6-9 m)
30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Spacing:
Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun
Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:
Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:
White/Near White

Bloom Time:
Mid Spring

Foliage:
Deciduous
Good Fall Color

Other details:
May be a noxious weed or invasive
This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds
Flowers are fragrant
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:
Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:
Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:
From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:
Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing
Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Profile:

No positives
1 neutral
1 negative

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Negative coriaceous On Apr 4, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

I concluded that this tree is an inferior ornamental long before I found out that it's also commonly invasive.

The lifespan of a callery pear is typically 10-15 years, with luck perhaps 20. (Dirr) I can't count the number of callery pears I've seen split and disintegrate before reaching maturity, because the tree's architecture can't support its own weight, especially in windy, snowy, or icy weather. Since 'Bradford', many cultivars have been released which are claimed to have stronger architecture, but they all have this propensity to splitting, and in the landscape I still see few surviving into maturity.

The flowers are pretty and very early, but they have a powerful pervasive stink.

The foliage is attractive and rarely troubled by disease. Fall color is generally good. But these merits don't begin to make up for the short lifespan.

This tree is tremendously overplanted. Given the variety of beautiful flowering trees that are available, why not choose something with more character and a longer life?

Some cultivars are self-sterile, but they all produce copious viable seeds (bird-dispersed) when they can cross-pollinate with another cultivar, or with root suckers when they're grafted, as they almost always are. The offspring are usually spiny and have become destructive of natural habitat in the eastern, midwestern, and southern US, according to the US National Park Service and the US Fish and Wildlife Service:

http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/pubs/midatlantic/pyca.htm
http://www.invasive.org/eastern/midatlantic/pyca.html

This species has naturalized from New York to Florida, west to Michigan, Kansas and Texas, and also in Utah and California.

Neutral nick89 On Mar 13, 2005, nick89 from Tallahassee, FL (Zone 8b) wrote:

The wild form of the familiar Bradford pear. Birds relish the tiny pears and spread it far and wide. Bradford stock eventually reverts back to this type. This species is naturalized and abundant in north Alabama. Since it lacks the narrow branch crotch angles of the Bradford, it makes a better shade tree. The crown is rounded to spreading in older specimens.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

New Market, Alabama
Daytona Beach, Florida
Troup, Texas



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