Large Chimanimani Aloe
Aloe munchii

Family: Aloaceae
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: munchii (MUNCH-ee-eye) (Info)
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Cactus and Succulents

Foliage Color:

Silver/Gray

Bronze-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Red-Orange

Bloom Time:

Mid Fall

Late Fall/Early Winter

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Succulent

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Scottsdale, Arizona

Reseda, California

Spring Valley, California

Vista, California

Gardeners' Notes:

4
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 19, 2011, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is a tree aloe native to Zimbabwe. It grows up to 15' tall and is usually solitary (rarely branching, usually near base) and was until recently a pretty rare plant in cultivation. Now I see these even for sale at local nurseries not specializing in succulents. Fast grower, growing from a 1' seedling to 3' flowering plant in my yard in just 3 years. Flowers are capitate, often branching simply and a deep orange. Leaves are pale blue-green and upright, reminding me of a giant, solitary Aloe acutissima. This is turning out to be a wonderful, common and easy landscape plant for southern California.

Positive

On Feb 10, 2010, baiissatva from Dunedin
New Zealand wrote:

Zone 9b coastal Otago NZ

I have a seedling similar to the one in Palmbob's first pic. It came to me a little beaten up and crispy but in the few spring/summer months Ive had it, it's put out good roots, fattened up and doubled it's leafage, so not a wimpy starter as some of the less common tree aloes can be (A Angelica, Im looking at you).

The leaves are a curious colour, the sort of turquoise-style green that an Aloe Speciosa has, overlaid with a faint grey that makes it stand out amid other aloes, even when young. Seems to be appreciating the considerable water that I'm giving it, almost as much as the thirsty A Vaombe I'm also rearing. The leaves are growing in an upright manner, not recurved or particularly spiny but there is a bright red on the margins... read more

Positive

On Sep 21, 2009, Menk from Darling Downs
Australia wrote:

Photos by RWhiz show very true to type plants. This Aloe often gets lovely orange leaf coloration in winter. It grows well here in Queensland, Australia. I was lucky to obtain a cutting recently from a friend who lives in a frost free area. I live in a frosty area in winter. As this is my first time growing the plant (it is now late spring), I have no experience with its frost hardiness. I will try to comment further on this species next year, after I see how it performs.

Positive

On Aug 22, 2006, thistlesifter from Vista, CA wrote:

I have grown several of these for almost 1 year. The winter color is beautiful orange and yellow, summer is lighter grayish light green. These are not mature plants so have not flowered. They grow well all year.

bob
:>)

Neutral

On Apr 5, 2006, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

This tree aloe is native to Zimbabwe and Mozambique. It can grow to 5m. The succulent leaves are dull gray-green with a reddish tinge.

I have no personal experience with this plant, but grow other aloes successfully.