Thunbergia
Thunbergia coccinea

Family: Acanthaceae (ah-kanth-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Thunbergia (thun-BER-jee-uh) (Info)
Species: coccinea (kok-SIN-ee-uh) (Info)
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Vines and Climbers

Height:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Red-Orange

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Late Fall/Early Winter

Foliage:

Evergreen

Herbaceous

Veined

Leathery-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

By simple layering

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Ashdown, Arkansas

Fort Myers, Florida

Plano, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Feb 13, 2012, eliasastro from Athens
Greece (Zone 10a) wrote:

Outside the tropics, like in my area, this vine usually flowers on early winter and therefore flowering is poor. Cool winter blasts disturb blooming a lot or even destroy it. Areas with very mild frostless winters may be more privileged. Otherwise, a heated greenhouse is needed for rich flowering. The same occurs with Thunbergia mysorensis, a species which is easily confused with.

Positive

On Mar 25, 2005, seedpicker_TX from (Taylor) Plano, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

This is gorgeous tropical climbing vine, which is extremely rare in cultivation.

It is evergreen in tropical climates, and deciduous in marginaly hardy climates.

With age(Mine took three years to bloom once planted in the ground within the greenhouse...) and a temperate climate, this climber will produce dozens of pendulous racemes of gorgeous orange to scarlet flowers.

The intensity of the color seems to depend upon the temperature in which it is blooming. I believe the orange coloring is more likely in warmer temperatures(which mine are in), and some fading from full sun, while the more intense redish coloring when blooming in cooler conditions. (When the greenhouse plastic was removed in early Spring, and the blooms were subjected to co... read more