Rye
Secale cereale

Family: Poaceae (poh-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Secale (se-KAY-lee) (Info)
Species: cereale (ser-ee-AY-lee) (Info)

Category:

Vegetables

Groundcovers

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Provides winter interest

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Stafford Springs, Connecticut

Custer, Kentucky

Bremerton, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 9, 2009, compostuser from Bremerton, WA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Excellent cover crop. Plant in late Fall and harvest seeds in late Summer. Chop up straw stalks and use to mulch strawberry patch.

Positive

On Mar 7, 2009, olmpiad from Dallas, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

A great grass, this is one of the more popular cereal crops. Apart from it's use as a grain, farmer's often plant it on their land in the winter to keep the soil loose for next spring. Some caution has to be taken with the plant however, as it is one of the main sources of the Ergot (Claviceps) fungi, and as such, can cause ergotism if an infected batch is ingested. Rye purchased for ingestion at stores does not have this danger, due to inspections.