Tatarian Maple, Acer Tataricum, "Hot Wings" Color all summer

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

Read the new review I posted. You may like this "smaller" tree originally discovered at the Fort Collins, (Colorado) Wholesale Nursery. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/183529/.

Check Tatarian Maple, Hot Wings

It's hard to beat a tree that looks like it has blood red "flowers" all summer?

The picture on their web site, http://www.ftcollinswholesalenursery.com/
are the blood red winged seeds.

Hopefully when I get one of the digital cameras from work I will be able to post high res photos!

Denver, CO(Zone 5b)

That is a great tree Pewjumper. I have been thinking of replacing my old peach tree with this.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I wish there were a picture of it in Plant Files. I spent some time this past winter trying to find a maple tree that would tolerate our alkaline soil in the west, for my neighbor who is determined to have a maple tree for the red color in the fall. I know this one has red seeds, but what do its leaves do in the fall? There really aren't all that many maple choices for the west because most maples love acid soils. But I do know of a few. This might be another welcome addition.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Now that I have downloaded the catalog, I am very impressed at the numbers of kinds of maples they carry! They probably have almost everything that will grow in the US, and I am sure they can tell us what grows in the Rockies.
Tartarian "Hot Wings" sounds great, though not red, as my neighbor wishes. But I am happy to hear of this tree which would no doubt be great in the Rocky Mt. area.

This message was edited Jul 26, 2009 9:07 PM

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

OMG this has incredible possibilities. Thanks for sharing Pewjumper. Now where can I jam in another woody I wonder???

Helena, MT(Zone 4b)

There are lots of Tatarian maples here in Helena. I think I've seen them at one of the nurseries. Many get chlorosis, but a little acidifier ought to correct that.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I spent a few years trying to correct the chlorosis in a large maple -- don't know what kind -- in my front yard several houses ago. I put on lots and lots and lots of iron and sulfur,etc and none of it helped a bit. What did help was when my sewer line broke -- quite a few years before I knew about it, it made a green stripe down the middle of an otherwise yellow tree. I don't think adding acidifiers will help with something as large as a maple. You have to get one adapted to your soil. There are a few that grow in alkaline soil. Those are the ones to buy. As my county agent says "The soil always wins."

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

Pajaritomt,

You may have provided an essential clue here in the chlorosis problem. I operate about twenty water systems and three wastewater treatment plants. When your sewer line was invaded it probably released the sulfur reducing bacteria that convert sulfur to sulfuric acid.

Hmmmmm...I know just where to get these wee beasties for use on a friend's silver maples. I WOULD NEVER RECOMEND THIS FOR USE AROUND EDIBLE CROPS.

I took pictures of the trees, downloaded the camera at work and e-mailed them to the house. I haven't seen the pictures show up yet. I will upload to the site ASAP.

The description of these trees say they are tolerant of many many adverse conditions including alkaline soil. One of the reason I picked them for this area as several of the maples in the area have chlorosis.

Thanks for the clues!

Helena, MT(Zone 4b)

That is fascinating.
Hmmm. Is "pewjumper" somehow related to your profession?

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

Picante,

Pewjumper comes from my sound system work at church. When my church used to rent a high school auditorium every Sunday I would help set up, operate & tear down the sound system every time. I would have to "carry" a 75 lb audio cable, (snake) over all the seats from the stage to the very back of the auditorium where the sound board was located. After awhile I could jump from seat arm to seat arm. Somebody made a comment about pentacostals, revivals and jumping seats. hence the name.

LOL

I used to do Cowboy action shooting and my alias was "Pewjumper", but you can call me Sonny.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Wow, you have an interesting past Pew. And present for that matter. Maybe the tree will thrive in our alkaline soils. That would be excellent. We need more good maples for the West. The only good ones I am aware of are the Canyon Maple and the Big-Tooth Maple. I think the paperbark maple is okay her as well -- doesn't tell about soil ph.
Organic matter is the way you make iron available to trees in alkaline soil. Or at least the best way. The trouble is, that it is very, very difficult to deliver enough iron to a chlorotic tree in alkaline soil because trees are so huge. I have heard of greening up a yellow maple by verticle fertilization meaning you go around the dripline of the tree -- just outside it and drill deep holes and fill them up with something like cottonseed meal which is acid and which contains plenty of nitrogen -- probably sewerage sludge would work if it were granulated so you could pour it down the hole. You make these holes every foot or so around the dripline of the tree -- very deep -- 18 inches or so. Then water it all very deep.
I heard of this from one of the urban forestry guys in the New Mexico State Agricultural Extension Service. Oddly enough, my dad used to feed oak trees that way in Louisiana so they would grow faster. It worked.
But let us hope that the Tartarian Maple truly is tolerant of our soil. If that is the case, it will be a wonderful tree here in the rockies. Maple color is really beautiful in the fall.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Look what I found on the internet. This tree really is tolerant of alkaline soils. You are in business pewjumper.


http://www.ext.colostate.edu/ptlk/2035.html

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

Well here is a picture of several of the Acer Tataricum, Hot Wing Maples. Is It just me or is it difficult to get these pictures to load?

Thumbnail by Pewjumper
Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

A close up of the "Hot Wings" Acer Tataricum

Thumbnail by Pewjumper
Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Love that tree. The seeds seem like flowers. What time of the year do the form?

It isn't hard to get the pictures to upload. It just takes forever -- at least for me.

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

Pajaritomt,

The key, (I hope) lies in soil building. My soil is starting out with a pH of 8.2! Since I want to live here in Glenwood Springs, Colorado for the rest of my life, I am putting in the hard, expensive effort to build my soil before I plant anything. This includes rock removal, ripping the "dirt" with a trackhoe down to about three feet and adding peat moss & cotton boll compost along with sulfur into the top 18". Then after six months I will rototill in Dr. Earth #7 organic fertilizer which also contains soil bacteria & michorizae. This is a whole other world compared to where I grew up in southern California with that quartz sand/clay river bottom soil.

People around here give me blank stares and just shake their heads, loco en la cabasa! I guess that means that I am more serious about my plants than most.

When I refered to the use of substances from one of my wastewater plants I meant that I would use what is called "supernatant". This is a clear liquid that is recycled back into the system as part of the thickening process of sludge. The supernatant contains a lot of sulfur reducing bacteria and is usually around 5.5 pH. The thickened sludge is very low in N-P-K and here it always mixed with composting material such as shreded newspaper, leaves & other wood products. After mixing, it is cooked according to EPA standards to produce a class "A" compost which is suitable for use on vegetables.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Sounds terrific. You seem to be doing a fantastic job of both preparing your soil and composting your sewerage.

So the maple tree you show isn't yours?

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

Pajaritomt,

The seeds form around April/May here in 5b Glenwood Springs, Colorado. I am a Sunset zone 2A. If my memory serves correctly the trees came with seeds on them in July of 2008 and lasted into the fall. Check my entry under plant files for a complete journal. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/183529/

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

I have four of these maples in the front of the property.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Thanks for the info. I have a neighbor who really wants a maple tree.

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

I hope your neighbor is as pleased with these trees as I am. Don't forget, these only are supposed to grow to maybe 30 feet, but they can be trained as a bush or multi-trunk tree.

The question still remains as to Fall color. We had liquid ambers in southern California that took a number of years to develop really nice fall color.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I hope she is pleased as well. I will send her the picture. Then I get to try to figure out where to get one. I am sure they will soon hit the nurseries around here.

Glenwood Springs, CO(Zone 5b)

You may want to call Fort Collins Wholesale Nursery (800) 794-1289 and see if they have any distributors in your area.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Thanks. I will pass that along to my neighbor.

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