Legal Status of Morning Glories Worldwide - Add Your Country

Birmingham, United Kingdom

Australia
Morning Glory plants and seeds are legal to grow and possess in Australia unless extracted. However, the import and export of I. tricolor, and I. hederaceae plants (including seeds) is prohibited under the Customs Act. (thanks R, YPMD)

Belgium
Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

Brazil
Morning Glories are uncontrolled in Brazil, but LSA is controlled
Morning Glory seed packets sold in gardening stores. We have been told that the seeds are considered "officially unfit for human consumption

Canada
McKenzie Seeds, a large Canadian seed company, reports that any seeds treated with toxic chemicals in Canada are required by law to both be labeled as treated on the packaging and have the seeds themselves be dyed with a color so chemically treated seeds are easily identified visibly

Denmark
MG seeds are commonly available in flower shops

Finland
Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

France
Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

Germany
Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

Greece
Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

Hungary
Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give).

Ireland
Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute.

Italy
Morning glory seeds are listed as controlled narcotic drugs in Italy. (Health Ministry Decree, 25 Sept 2007)

Netherlands: The plants and seeds of morning glory species are legal to possess, cultivate, buy, and distribute.

Poland: Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

Portugual: Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

Romania: Seeds are commonly sold in gardening stores without legal restriction.

Serbia & Montenegro: Legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

Singapore: seeds are sold in flower stores

Slovakia: We have been told that plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute

South Africa: Some provinces consider Morning Glory to be an invasive weed (Category 1 or 3). ALIEN INVASIVE PLANTS AND WEEDS.

Spain: Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

Turkey: Plants and seeds are legal to cultivate, buy, possess, and distribute (sell, trade or give)

United Kingdom, England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland: No restrictions, no prohibited or illegal morning glories. These can be freely traded sold and are available in any shop

United States
Arizona
All Ipomoea species listed as "noxious weeds" in Arizona and are illegal to cultivate. Penalties are 1st or 2nd degree misdemeanor.

Arkansas: 40 species of Ipomoea are either prohibited or invasive; see here
http://plants.usda.gov/java/stateSearch?searchTxt=ipomoea&searchType=Sciname&stateSelect=US05&searchOrder=1&imageField.x=64&imageField.y=5

Lousiana : Effective Aug 8, 2005 (signed into law Jun 28, 2005) Louisiana Act No 159 makes 40 plants illegal, including Ipomoea tricolor when intended for human consumption. The law specifically excludes the "possession, planting, cultivation, growing, or harvesting" of these plants if used "strictly for aesthetic, landscaping, or decorative purposes." (Text of HLS_05RS-52 and Update June 2005)


It is also illegal in the United States of America to consume morning glory seeds (morning glory tea) under Schedule III Controlled Substances (2005)

US who wishes to import seeds on a small scale may now apply for an Import Permit which will allow them to bring seeds into the United States, subject to certain conditions. Details of how to obtain a Permit are on the APHIS website: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ppq/Q37/smalllotsseed.html.

Seeds of species which are normally prohibited are not allowed into the US under the new Small Lots of Seed Program

See prohibited plant thread here : http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1023750/

and here (complete list)

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=6919352

It is a criminal offence under US law to send propagating material of a prohibited species or invasive species between states. If you are growing such a species for someone, or if someone requests this type of material you can be guilty Under 18 U.S.C. 2, aiding and abetting, this liability is available in all federal criminal prosecutions



This message was edited Aug 7, 2009 8:44 PM

Thumbnail by Rareseedman
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL(Zone 10a)

The majority of USA states do not prohibit Morning Glories, but there are some states that do prohibit some species or all. To check the status of your state ...

Here is the link to the Invasive and Noxious Weeds List by each USA state.
Just click on your state or any state (if you are planning to send seeds) and scroll down the list of plants. If you click on the plant name you will get more details about the plant.:

http://www.plants.usda.gov/java/noxiousDriver

Here are most of the "State Weed Status (Codes)":

PNW - PROHIBITED Noxious Weed
RNW - Restricted Noxious Weed

AW - A list (noxious weeds)
BW - B list (noxious weeds)
CW - C list (noxious weeds)

CAW - Class A noxious weed
CBW - Class B noxious weed
CCW - Class C noxious weed

NP - Noxious plant
NW - Noxious weed
NAW - Noxious aquatic weed
RGNW - Regulated noxious weeds
PN - Public nuisance
Q - Quarantine
QW - Q list (temporary "A" list noxious weed, pending final determination)
P - Prohibited
PP - Plant Pest
IAP - Invasive aquatic plant
IB - Invasive, banned
INB - Invasive, not banned
PIB - Potentially invasive, banned
PINB - Potentially invasive, not banned

This message was edited Aug 8, 2009 8:46 AM

Pretoria, South Africa

Hi Rareseedman,

I am sure the MG refered to in South Africa are the I. purpurea that tends to be invasive. The Ipomoea tricolor 'Heavenly Blue' is readily available in shops. I haven't seen any I.nils in South Africa apart from the few I grow. I can't see that they will be a problem as I yet have to come accross a self sown plant in my garden, and even though lots of seeds drop, and having relatively moderate winter temperatures - we hardly ever get below freezing where I live, but even those kind of temperatures seems to be too cold for the seeds to survive in the soil.

I do have one or two purpureas as they are not prohibited in my province, but I do grow them in pots to make sure that they don't become invasive...

Elsa

Tokyo, Japan(Zone 10a)



This message was edited Jul 2, 2010 1:39 PM

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