So, what are you reading now? (Part the second)

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Tell us what you're reading, and what you think of it - why do you like/love/hate it and what's next on your list/ bed side table/ shelf?

Plano, TX

just started a prayer for owen meany--not new but never got around to reading it--john irving--think they might have made a made a movie about it--i haven't read much yet but do like his syle--keeps me coming back!

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

It was a good book, IMO - not quite as good as Garp or Cider House Rules - but still good. I like his style, too. Why the heck can't I remember his name???

... will ... not... Google.... will NOT.....

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I read it a long time ago. It was pretty good, definitely good plot which keeps reader interest, not sure I agree with his philosophy of life -- that your fate is predetermined.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Pagancat, yes, Loved Walked In was better. I couldn't wait for the sequel but as I said, it was a bit disappointing. Sort of as though she'd already said everything she had to say about those characters and was forcing it.

I just finished Margaret Maron's Death's Half-Acre, which just came out in paperback. I really like her Deborah Knott series; they are mysteries about a woman judge in North Carolina and the characters are very well drawn. I also just got Christina Thompson's Come on Shore and We Will Kill and Eat You All, about New Zealand and the Maoris, but I haven't started it yet.

Plano, TX

going to book club tonight to talk about the julia childs book-my life in france--

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I really enjoyed that, although it was sad at the end when Paul was sick and no longer able to be with her, and when she gave up her French home. Still, they had a good run, in the end; what a rich, full life!

Plano, TX

i know--what a rich, full life is right!

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

John Irving. Geez, what a memory (not!).

I still haven't seen Julie and Julia, is it worth it, having read the book?

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I would say it was worth it. It is not just Julia's story but also Julie's. Julie has vowed to cook every single recipe in Mastering the Art of French Cooking in 1 year and to blog about it. I thought it was very nice. Not earth shaking, but very fun.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

LOL - did they cover how much weight she gained???

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Who? Julie or Julia? Only mentioned, not really covered.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

LOVED Owen Meany, and Garp, CiderHouse Rules was good too but could be disturbing, Hotel New Hampshire Definitely is disturbing.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I saw CiderHouse Rules. I liked it. Wasn't so crazy about Owen Meany. It was okay, in my view. I don't know why I never read garp and I had never heard of Hotel New Hampshire. Don't know what it is about, but disturbing isn't always bad in a book.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Julie - I have yet to see a recipe of Julia's that didn't have have cream, butter or alcohol (not that I have seen many of them). I wasn't surprised when she mentioned that both she and Paul had digestive problems while living in Paris, whatever the cause!

Yeah, Hotel New Hampshire was disturbing - I forgot that I had read that. He's not a writer to completely let you go on cruise control, is he?

Plano, TX

i kept turning away from his books-in my mind he wrote crazy characters and while i do like some off the wall characters i didn't want to read someone who just writes about strange people-- but i find i am really enjoying his style -i think i should have known he was much more since he is so popular-but sometimes you get something in your mind and it sticks!

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I have only read these, not seen movies. The disturbing part of Cider House is abortion; in Hotel NH it's incest. I just didn't understand why that was in HNH, I guess I need a book club or to read some analysis.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I really like to read about characters whose behavior I can admire or relate to in a positive way. That's why I often come back to Nevil Shute's books. Except for On the Beach, which is depressing, all of the others that I've read deal with people who rise to a challenge of some sort and who have a sort of natural goodness. Trustee from the Toolroom is one of my favorites of his.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Rising to a challenge and innate goodness ... sounds awfully good to me!

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Noting Nevil Shute- I agree, I think I'd like something encouraging. Might be one to try for my mom.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

For your mom or for you. It's nice reading about good people!

Newark, OH(Zone 5b)

I am a bit ashamed to say that I have read very few classics. A year ago, I listened to East of Eden and really enjoyed it. I am very near-sighted. I wear strong contacts with trifocals over them. So actually reading can be a problem. I usually listen to books when I can.

However, today when I dropped off my Mother's books, I asked the librarian for a suggestion. I came out with The Grapes of Wrath.

I would welcome suggestions of other classics that are really great stories, especially those that may still be popular enough for me to find as audiobooks.

I enjoy all kinds of books - well, maybe not science fiction. :-)


Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

What about Jane Austen? She's one of my all-time favorites. I would start with Pride and Prejudice.

Newark, OH(Zone 5b)

I have listened to P&P, Robinson Caruso, Gone with the Wind. Tried War and Peace but the reader was difficult to understand so I didn't continue. I cannot think of any others off the top of my head. I did not go to college. My high school was trying a new thing when I was in school - nine week mini courses in different aspects of a subject. It was fun at the time. But- I came out of it with poor spoken and written English skills, even though I got good grades. I never had to read any classics. I took "reading" classes but we could pick any books we wanted to read and report on. I would LOVE to improve my speaking and writing because I know my poor skills make me seem less intelligent than I am. I am 51 now, so perhaps I never will improve. I bought an English Grammer for Dummies book a couple years ago and couldn't make much sense off it.

I always felt bad, with my love for reading, that I have never read the classics. Just have never known where to start.

Perhaps I should start a thread- is it ok to ask for recommendations here in this thread??

I have "read" so many good books by following the threads here about what people are reading or what people liked.

Plano, TX

of course you can ask for recommendations here but i like the idea of starting a new thread for classics--i think all (or most) of us sometimes feel that we missed some of the classics for one reason or another and wonder if we shouldn't make up for it now--and we all have classics that we loved--i have never read gone with the wind (not sure it is a classic) and i know so many people list that as a favorite book--

(Zone 8a)

I've taken the plunge and started a new thread where we can discuss classic novels. I look forward to your contributions.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1037849/

Sue :)

Grantsboro, NC(Zone 8b)

Just finished A Bend in the Road by Nicholas Sparks
All my co-workers thought they should buy all his books for my retirement party in nov.07.
I have 8 and then DH saw I had them so he ordered The Last Singer, and it arrived yesterday.
OK so Nichilas lives accross the river from us. But enough is enough.

I have gone back to work March 08 and my coworkerorkwe here brought in Always time to die by Elizabeth Lowell andy one know anything about her?

Lavina

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

I think you might like her LavinaMae if you like Nicholas Sparks. Other authors you might like (and maybe you do already ) who also write romance with an element of tragedy are Maeve Binchy and Anne Rivers Siddons. My mom is a big fan of that genre and really likes Binchy and Siddons.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I really like some Binchy but not all of hers. Scarlet Feather, Quentins and Evening Class are my favorites because they all deal with roughly the same group of people, so you get to see more of them. Scarlet Feather is the best, I think; more complex and less formulaic than a lot of her others. Another very underappreciated person in the same genre is Mary Sheepshanks. A Price for Everything and Picking Up the Pieces are really excellent British novels about families and their situations, mostly dealing with man/woman relationships. She's quite bright and writes very well.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

GH_gal, I am enjoying "love walked in" immensely. I think it's even better, having read the sequel first, it's a guessing game to how things finally get settled out as I know they will.

Plano, TX

i like binchy too--haven't read her for a long time so i know i have missed her latest--she writes a lot doesn't she?! very talented in what she does--i remember reading an interview with her and she said she was at at wedding and saw her reflection in the mirror--she didn't recognize herself and thought "that seems like a nice, pleasant, overweight, middle age women" and when she realized it was herself she was pleased! for some reason i always liked that little slice of life story

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

I luv that too! Thanks for sharing planolinda.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

That's really neat.

Plano, TX

i love that she didn't see herself as someone who needs improvement since she saw a slightly overweight and middle age woman--i think so often women think we are in need of improvement--

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Exactly.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

When I moved to rural Tennessee, a good friend suggested to that I read "Jayber Crow" by Wendell Berry. I'm about 50 pages into it, so far, so good!

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I read Jayber Crow a long time ago because I like Wendell Berry, but I don't remember much about it. I just finished The Piano Shop on the Left Bank by Thad Carhart and was surprised at how good it was. I don't play the piano, but my husband does; we have an old upright that used to be a player piano that he uses. Even so, I found the book fascinating in its history of pianos, discussions of the culture of music, and glimpses into the life of a Parisian quartier. Really excellent writing, too.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Thanks for the review greenhouse_gal. I haven't read that yet.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Who was it that was reading "An Unquiet Mind"? I'm really absorbed by this woman's story - she tells her life story in terms of her madness, beautifully. She must be an incredibly remarkable person to have done so much while being under such a strain.

(Zone 8a)

I just finished reading Nick Harkaway's novel The Gone Away World. How to describe it? It's certainly like nothing else I've ever read. A post apocalyptic journey which covers just about every genre! For a first novel it's remarkably assured - and very funny.

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