So, what are you reading now? (Part the second)

The Woodlands, TX(Zone 9a)

Has anyone read "Let the Great World Spin" by Colum McCann? I am half way through it, and I would like someone to tell me if it gets better, or if I should just chuck it. It is so heavy, so dark, so...depressing.

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

I'd love to have the Dilbert executive decision maker. Maybe I can find one on eBay. It would make a great birthday gift for my spousal unit.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Sorry, ceejaytown, can't give you any insight - haven't heard of it. If you care to look at Amazon's page, they have a vid of McCann talking the book.... perhaps that might give you better insight. http://www.amazon.com/Let-Great-World-Spin-Novel/dp/0812973992/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262486541&sr=8-1

The Woodlands, TX(Zone 9a)

Thanks, Pagan. I left my comment after another's 1 star review. It really isn't worth the time. If anyone finishes it, let me know. But I give up for now.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I just read Stevenson's Amateur Emigrant and Silverado Squatters, thanks to recommendations here, and it was just fascinating. The edition I have also provides some background into the serious health problems that he was having while he wrote those, and the family issues that were contributing to his lack of financial support, so that was interesting. He has such a lovely style, and it was so much fun to read about the United States back when Monterey was first being developed. I had read Richard Henry Dana's Two Years Before the Mast many years ago, and that book brought home how very recently the west coast was settled. His descriptions of the hills around San Francisco, almost totally unpeopled at the time, were astonishing. So Stevenson's impressions, not that many years later, offered another picture of how quickly the area was built up, although you could still see remnants of what Dana described.

I also ordered Stevenson's An Inland Voyage, after recently finishing Travels with a Donkey. I just looked back to see where the discussion of Stevenson was, but it seems to be lost in the mists of time. Anyway he's a great read, although I didn't care for his novels, like Kidnapped.

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

I just read a long article in the New Yorker about Whole Foods. Their C.E.O. is a nut. While he does profess a belief that eating correctly will help avoid many illnesses, he also justifies Big Business because he believes that he is good to everyone including suppliers, employees, customers, etc. But he is against univeral health care. He has a bad case of foot-in-mouth-disease. And the article says he is hard to work for.The board of directors have thought often about firing him and after he says in this article, "Whole Food will die some day. Everything does," he might just end up on the side walk too. What a paradox he is.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I had heard about his opposition to universal health care; it did make me think twice about shopping there, not that it's a practical option for me since the nearest one is an hour away. Haven't read the New Yorker article yet; I'm way behind in my issues! You'd think they'd want to ditch him; I'm sure his personal philosophy goes against that of a lot of loyal patrons.

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

that's true and he knows it. But he really believes that big corporations will take care of their employees. Yet more and more of them are cutting benefits. And what about all the folks that don't work for big corporations? Small businesses have reached the point where they cannot afford to pay even 1/2 the costs of health care.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

If I were on the board of Whole Foods, I would fire the current CEO, but then, I wonder if the board of WF isn't hand picked by the CEO -- that's the way it usually works. And if so, they agree with him. I do shop at Whole Foods but I don't buy anything there unless it is unavailable elsewhere. It is also an hour away for me. A very nice, locally owned mostly Middle Eastern grocery has opened near Whole Foods and is locally owned. They don't have much that I want, but I do go there for anything they have that I can't get here in Los Alamos or at Trader Joe's which is also near the two of them. I was sure the little store wouldn't make it but the owner is very tenacious. She is from Tunisia and seems to be very committed to making her little store succeed. I buy harissa, spices and bulgur wheat there. I will start buying my Cannellini beans there, too, because WF no longer carries them and I was ordering them on the internet. Unfortunately the little grocery doesn't carry any fresh produce.
Don't forget that Whole Foods started in Texas and I am sure you can guess how Texas feels about universal health care. Yes, I am sure there are plenty of Texans who favor it but that is not the kind of people they generally send to Congress.

Plano, TX

of course texas is pretty big and hard to generalize about--everyone likes to think of texas as the death penalty state and the concealed guns --

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Yes, linda, I am very aware that not everyone in Texas is like the people that get sent to Congress. I am aware of people like Cecile Richards, daughter of Ann Richards who is now in Washington as head of Planned Parenthood and her husband who was and perhaps still is head of the ACLU. They only left Texas for a greater opportunity to serve. And I actually love Whole Foods. It's just that I try to go to other stores first. Do you have Trader Joe's in your area? It is great -- but Greenpeace has issues with the fish they sell. We do buy a lot of fish there, but I don't think the kind we buy is on the Greenpeace red list.

Plano, TX

i wish so much that we did have a trader joe's!! i really like trader joe's

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Really, no where in Dallas? Nashville (TN, actually) just got their first one, after many years of begging. The chances of them coming out this far into the boonies is slim-to-none....

Plano, TX

no--in fact we wrote to them about it! they said something like-we hope to open a store there some time---not much encouragement really

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

We got one in Santa Fe before they got one in Albuquerque. We felt so lucky. Of course, Los Alamos is out of the question -- we are lucky that we have a supermarket. I don't know what I did before we got Trader Joe's. I get the kind of pasta -- prepared and frozen in a sack -- that DH loves. I get reasonably priced good quality fish. DH loves the Mahi Mahi best which is not on the Greenpeace list. Alas, he loves their smoked salmon which probably is on the Greenpeace list. I can buy frozen vegan dinners that don't cost an arm and a leg and beans cooked and sealed in plastic then refrigerated -- which have a very long shelf life and are flavored with herbs and have very low salt. You can eat them plain or use them in recipes. We get fabulous humus and, cheap decent wine. Even DH likes to shop there and he detests shopping. Oh and inexpensive flower bouquets much nicer than the ones in supermarkets. Keep begging. It is worth it.
Don't know too much about their management and policies, but I had a nephew who worked there for years and loved it and only left when his living arrangement fell apart and he had to move back to Albquerque where it was cheaper. Also, there was a major bruhaha when the City of Santa Fe decided to raise the minimum wage there to $9.50 per hour. All the businesses in town claimed that doing so would put them out of business and when asked by the local paper what they thought of the living wage, they said that they had no problem with it, that they paid a lot more than that anyhow. I gather they do get health care. Don't know how good it is but there are some faces in the Santa Fe store that I have been seeing for a long time.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

3 buck Chuck!

(The inexpensive, Charles Swan (?) wine....loved it!)

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

We don't have any Trader Joe's here at all.
Back to what we're reading, I ran out of my spousal unit's Dilbert books so now I am reading Calvin and Hobbes, lol. I sure will be glad to get back to the library. Places for over a week have either been closed for holidays and/or snow, or I couldn't get out of my neighborhood or I had a car problem, etc. So I am desperate for something to read. I do have a biography of Frederick Law Olmsted called "A Clearing In The Distance." He is a hero of mine but I just haven't started it yet. The book is a paperback and is beginning to fall apart. I need to learn how to repair books.
Can we start a Part, the third?

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Here is Part the Third:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1066757/

Come on over!

Sydney, Australia

I just finished reading the Statistical Probability of Love. It is a nice book though the plot is just simple. I am now planning to read good old novels like Emma. Can anyone suggest good old novels to read? Thanks in advance. Happy reading!

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Cherry, this is an old thread which was continued in a link in the post above yours. But I would recommend anything by Jane Austen, and have you read much of Rudyard Kipling? Kim is a favorite of mine.

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

I just finished Wuthering Heights but I liked Pride and Prejudice better. Before that I read The Old Curiosity Shop which wasn't what I expected but it was quite good. Now I'm reading Anna Karenina. Even thought it has been translated into English, it definitely has a Russian Flavor.
I think I'll reread David Copperfield at some point. I have been able to get into A Tale of Two Cities but will try again as it is supposed to be one of Dickens' best.
I can't pic my favorite out of these.
I love my Kindle.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Cherry, good old British novels are quite a bit different than good old American ones. If you are a Jane Austin fan then there are a lot of options. Charlotte Bronte is also in the same vein. I liked Mansfield Park. Meanwhile, see you on the new thread.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Okay, I started a new thread for this topic. There are actually continuations of this one already set up, but they are also very lengthy. Since we started afresh here I figured a totally new thread jumping off from this one was in order. Come on over:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1356525/

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

End of Eve by Ariel Gore
memoir
forty something struggles with job and relationship while trying to 'caregive' her ailing but difficult mother

Can't we talk about something more pleasant? Roz Chast
memoir
Fans of her New Yorker cartoons will recognize her style. You will laugh until you cry as she comes to terms with her parents aging, move to assisted living, and death. If you've gone through this yourself as caregiver, it may serve as therapy, you have plenty of company in the things you all went through.

The Blue Cotton Gown- Patricia Harman
memoir-
(...I was browsing the memoir review section of Library Journal....)

Nurse-midwife in rural West Virginia tells her story and those of some patients, contemporary time period

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Seriously Mum, Where's That Donkey by Alan Parks looks like an interesting freebie on BookBub today. It's about an expat couple that takes up alpaca farming in Spain. I've spent a lot of time in Spain so I was curious about this true story.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I read it and it was all right. See what you think.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Okay (but I'm trying to stay in your newer thread). Still have a long way to go on American Pastoral.

Midlothian, United States(Zone 7a)

Hello - I'm new here, but I've always got a book or so going, so I thought I would jump in. At this time, I am reading about the Romanov's...a diary of sorts by daughter Maria. I'm enjoying it much.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Hi and welcome Anngam. Apparently the thread by the same title with "2014" is the more current place for lit chat. We should have a 2015 thread for less confusion. Look forward to you sharing your reading.
Laurel

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Welcome anngam! That sounds very interesting.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1398810/

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Sounds tiring but busy and full of love. I envy you! We have three big kids at home and are slogging through the 'becoming real adults' phase

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