Bradenton, FL(Zone 9a)

Anyone here grow dyckia's?

Thumbnail by turtlewalker342
Gainesville, FL

I do. I have a bunch planted outdoors. They all, without exception, made it through the 13 nights of 20's we had. I am planting more.

Ventress, LA(Zone 8b)

I bought my first tiny one a couple of months ago. Do they really survive the winter outdoors?

Gainesville, FL

They do here but the deer will eat them if you are not careful spines and all

Ventress, LA(Zone 8b)

What zone is Gainesville, Florida? I am in zone 9.

Gainesville, FL

We are considered 8B but really closer to 9

Yorba Linda, CA

raises hand.

About a year ago I took a huge interest int he little buggers. I refer to them as 'little evil murder plants' because of the massive barbs.

Not sure what it is about this species and it's cultivars, but it is an intriguing little plant.

Bradenton, FL(Zone 9a)

Not many people grow them I guess, but I love them.

Thumbnail by turtlewalker342
Christiana, TN(Zone 6b)

I plan to add Dyckias to my 'small' collection soon. I sure wish I could grow them outside like you guys do.

Ventress, LA(Zone 8b)

I have one med size dykia that I brought inside for the winter. It doesn't look too prickly. The name on the label is orthophylom. It has a grey tinge to it.

Yorba Linda, CA

sure that isn't orthophytum?

completely different Bromeliad.

Ventress, LA(Zone 8b)

I probably is. Can't read the handwriting too well.
Then it isn't a dykia?

Springfield, MO(Zone 6a)

It's a Dyckia. There are Orthophytums that look somewhat similar but they almost always have a discerable stem.
These guys are tough. This picture is a very small part of an Argentina landscape I shot in November 2008. There were thousands and thousands of them (still not sure which one) covering the hillsides. They are subjected to a lot of frost here and very dry conditions. I can attest that they develop very extensive root systems which is their survival strategy. Yes, they do have fleshy leaves but they can olny hold so much moisture.

Most growers will tell you that they like big pots - and they certainly will develop a very large root system. Just because they survive in the high desert doesn't mean they like it (or won't do better with more moisture). I've killed my share of Dyckias in the greenhouse only because I fell victim to the thought that "...they're desert plants and don't need much water." (Most of these were in small pots.) If you grow tham in small pots just water them as if they weren't desert plants - they will be very happy.

Thumbnail by digital_dave
Dallas, TX(Zone 8a)

I'm growing Dyckia Silver Superstar now.

Here's the current photo progress of my seeds germinating:

https://picasaweb.google.com/KimchiMonger/RandySDyckiaSilverSuperstarSeedProject#slideshow/5580654066371600226

Gainesville, FL

Still growing mine outdoors after years. They have started xeriscaping around town with large planting of Dyckia 'Cherry Coke'. Almost maintenance free

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