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Relocating bulbs

Kimmell, IN

When I first moved to my house (about 6 years ago) I got excited about making a garden. There was no garden currently, so I worked up a spot in the front yard (the only place big enough) and tried to have a little garden. Much to my dismay my job took so much of my time that I did not have time to take care of the garden. By fall I hadn't given up hope (surely next year would be better) and went ahead and planted crocus, tulips, and daffodils at one end of the garden. After a job change and a family tragedy, I gave up the garden all together and last spring started to mow it after the bulbs' foliage had died back down. This year the bulbs are coming up great but I would really like to move them to a different location. Problem is that I was going to do this last fall and because I was mowing the area I couldn't come up with a way to mark exactly where the bulbs are and I really didn't want to excavate the whole yard looking for them. Is there a way to mark the spot the bulbs are at and still mow over them or can the bulbs be moved after they bloom while the foliage is still there to mark the spot?

Lewisville, TX(Zone 7b)

I would not move the bulbs until their season is over with.. if you originally planted them in the fall season then you should replant them the same way. That way they will continue to bloom in the spring as usual. With regards to marking them/mowing over them... perhaps you can place a garden figure of some sort over the spot.. unless it looked too goofy.
I usually use a stick to mark where my bulbs are but that is within my garden & only after I've moved them to the new spot.. so I don't dig them up later as I put something else in.. like an annual.
I am sorry I couldn't be of any more help. Good luck

Durhamville, NY(Zone 5b)

First you need to leave foliage on them for 5 or 6 weeks so that they can put enough food away to bloom next year. If you don't want to leave a stake in the ground after the foliage dies down because it interferes with mowing then this what I would do. Put a stake or something into the ground near the bulbs and then take a picture. This way you'll know where the bulbs are relative to the stake. To relocate the stake in the fall run a string from each corner of the house and measure each leg. This will allow you to relocate the stake. See the picture I attached.

Thumbnail by Doug9345
Belmont, WI(Zone 4b)

Just a thought, go pick up some brightly colored plastic golf tees and put several around each plant.Wal-Mart sells them and they are cheep. If put in far enough you can moe over and still see.
Greg

Durhamville, NY(Zone 5b)

I like that idea as I have some bulbs I need to dig up and spread out. Thanks -Doug

Kimmell, IN

Thanks for the ideas. I think I will try a combination of both. I think I will do some measuring in case the golf tees are gone by fall, but hopefully they will still be there.

Cincinnati (Anderson, OH(Zone 6a)

Hi, Jenny,

BTW, many people (especially in the UK) have good luck moving poorly placed bulbs "in the green". You don't often hear of doing it in the States, but it can be done, and I have done it successfully for the past two years. I am moving mine around this week while they are nice (and visible) and the spring rains will help them settle in).

Here are some instructions on how to do it:

http://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/moving-spring-flower-bulbs.html

http://www.reeves-reedarboretum.org/blog/2006/05/moving-bulbs-in-green.html

Good luck. t.

Weedville, PA(Zone 6a)

Just happened upon this thread and had to say THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU for mentioning that bulbs can be moved "in the green"!!!! I will soon be in the process of transplanting my gardens and was not looking forward to leaving all my spring flowering bulbs behind. I probably would have tried transplanting them in the green, but it's nice to know ahead of time that I won't be harming them...and what to expect.

Cincinnati (Anderson, OH(Zone 6a)


Glad to be of some help, heathrjoy.

They often recommend for best results that you dig your new holes first (or very quickly after to dig your tulip up) and don't tarry in replanting them.

Lewisville, TX(Zone 7b)

I've just replanted some daffodils still "in the green".. they finished blooming about a month ago so I felt it was safe to. I noticed there was a lot of bulbs so I've separated them as I replanted them.. I am sure there is going to be a good showing next year.. it will be nice since my daffodils have hardly bloomed since planting them 5 yrs ago. IF it is successful you canbet I will be digging up all the rest in order to separate them so bloom better! hahaha

Weedville, PA(Zone 6a)

Yes, I will be sure to have my holes dug and ready before digging up the bulbs. I have to make wire cages for the bulbs. All will be prepared for the bulbs before any are dug up. The hardest part is deciding where to put them in the new garden....but now that we all know we can move them "in the green" it does make things much easier! ;-)

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

WOW - Dave's Garden is just so full of wonderful information!!

THANKS tabasco for the great info & links on moving bulbs "in the green"!!!

As a fairly new bulb planter it's so helpful to find information on an area of gardening that is already becoming an obsession ( I'm already looking at bulbs for next near!).


Silver Spring, MD(Zone 6b)

What does moving bulbs "in the green" mean? Never heard of that expression used before so am not sure what it means.

Kimmell, IN

Pippi,

Read the rest of the thread particularly the entry from tabasco

Trenton, MI(Zone 5b)

tabasco, I bet moving the 'bulbs in the green' probably happens more often than you think in the USA. I've been doing it for years, just don't talk about it because it seems like a 'no no'. I find it so much easier to dig while they are blooming and I'm all about 'easy'. LOL

Saugerties, NY(Zone 5a)

WOW, that is great news for me to hear. As a renter I have let behind alot of bulbs because I did not know about "in the green" Thank you so much :>)
Christine

Cincinnati (Anderson, OH(Zone 6a)


Great.

Yes, it moving bulbs 'in the green' does seem to be a no-no on DG, but it works for me, too.

Greeley, CO(Zone 5b)

Check out the thread Solutions for Past Blooming Bulbs.

I don't know how to post a link, sorry...

This is how I do it almost every year and it have worked wonders for me. I have only lost a few due to over zealous digging.

Saugerties, NY(Zone 5a)

Onyxwar here's the link you referred to :>)
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1089701/

Greeley, CO(Zone 5b)

Thanks.

How do you do that? Just type it in?

Durhamville, NY(Zone 5b)

I personally cut and paste it from the address bar at the top of the browser. I'm less likely to get a typo that way. I usually click on it in the preview mode just to make sure I didn't cut a character off the end or something.

Saugerties, NY(Zone 5a)

I do the cut & paste also. Someone showed me how to do it otherwise I wouldnt know how LOL
Christine

Greeley, CO(Zone 5b)

Thanks.

Washington, DC

This is a wonderful solution to a problem I faced today. I have a small garden 6'X20' that I like to fill with plants (ala English garden) but the tulip and daffodil leaves take up so much room for such a long time that I can't plant anything in those areas. By the time the leaves have browned it's too hot here in DC to even plant annuals. I was thinking of planting the bulbs in whiskey barrels and then moving the barrels to the patio after the flowers are gone but that would be a major lifting job. My garden is set inside a 4' high wall (wonderful for my back). Now I think I will continue to plant them in the garden and transplant them to the whiskey barrels on the patio to complete their cycle.

Thank you

Trenton, MI(Zone 5b)

good2, so much easier to move those bulbs instead of the whiskey barrels. lol

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