Petopentia natalensis

Sun Lakes, AZ(Zone 9b)

My Petopentia natalensis I just got in April. I love the way the back of the leaves are a beautiful purple color. I think I need a bigger trellis!

Thumbnail by NancySLAZ
Sun Lakes, AZ(Zone 9b)

Is anyone growing this plant? I have had a hard time with it since it got really hot. I lost many leaves. They just dried up from the low humidity I think because I watered it enough. I recently brought it into the house and put it under an artificial light and on a tray of damp stones and it is starting to grow new leaves. If I can just make it through the summer .......

Mountlake Terrace, WA(Zone 8a)

I just hit Birmann's Caudex to see what the heck you were talking about http://www.bihrmann.com/caudiciforms/subs/pet-nat-sub.asp says water should be maximal and sun medium, so this is a grower in shade that loves the moisture.

Sun Lakes, AZ(Zone 9b)

Thanks AD. Maybe I wasn't watering it enough! I am now though. In the house in my kitchen greenhouse window I look at it every day and water a lot. It is looking better each day.

Mountlake Terrace, WA(Zone 8a)

I do a lot of research on most of my plants before I buy them and in terms of caudiciforms, this is a first stop then a hunt for some one growing it and their notes. I am just careful as I cannot support the growth of many succulents here, like the standard Stapelia group due I think to the humidity. But Fockea, Uncarina, Pseudobombax and Pelargonium grow great for me grown in medium sun, they seem to be less humidity and light freaks..

Sun Lakes, AZ(Zone 9b)

Yes, I agree. I love my Uncarinas, especially roeoesliana. It is sure dry here usually and they do fine.

Yardley, PA

Hi Nancy, I have the Petropentia natalensis and I do love the leaves. Big, shiny and the purple on the back is beautiful. I also give mine a lot of water in the summer.

Thumbnail by Sally0
Sun Lakes, AZ(Zone 9b)

Your plant is great Sally. Do you use the smaller S/H "pebbles" in some of your pots? Some of your pictures seem to have larger ones and some smaller.

Yardley, PA

Nancy I use the large on almost everything. I use the small on very few. Only if they have real small roots or are seedlings. None of my caudiciforms.

Sun Lakes, AZ(Zone 9b)

Thanks for the info Sally. That's what is says on the s/h web site too.

Mountlake Terrace, WA(Zone 8a)

thanks for the tips, too, Sally, I will defiantly be looking for some for my Epis as a start in the spring.

Yardley, PA

It has been a fun adventure and has saved a lot of my plants I am sure.

Port Elizabeth, South Africa(Zone 10a)

Sally, you have convinced me to try this as well. I have found the clay pellets (hydroton) it called here, and will get some via courier next week. We live next to the ocean, and humidity is a problem, I am hoping that this option may help to give me options on my succulent succulents, if that makes sense. I have to try!

I like the idea of a dry line between the roots and base (or good airflow), because that is the sensitive area for me.

This message was edited Oct 10, 2010 5:19 PM

Yardley, PA

It just made sense to me when I first tried it for my orchids and decided to try it on the other plants. Plus, many grow a lot faster because the roots are free. Some, however, seem to grow at the same rate as if they were in dirt.

Post a Reply to this Thread

You must log in and subscribe to Dave's Garden to post in this thread.
BACK TO TOP