medusa/euphorbia-caudex

Arlington, TX

I have a small medusa euphorbia (no idea about which species, it was a gift). I planted it with the thickened stem a little higher and am wondering if these can be raised up to form a decent caudex. The stem/root tapers so I am not sure how much if any it would thicken up over time. Anyone try this before?
C

Port Elizabeth, South Africa(Zone 10a)

If you refer to these, I've tried it without issues. NOT medusa, but same pudding, different sauce!! LOL!

E. tortirama

This message was edited May 1, 2011 7:00 PM

Thumbnail by Little_things
Port Elizabeth, South Africa(Zone 10a)

This one is naturally looking like that

Thumbnail by Little_things
Port Elizabeth, South Africa(Zone 10a)

This one is in the garden to do its thing - think its a woody.

Thumbnail by Little_things
Arlington, TX

Mine looks like either flanaganii or arida, probably arida. Very cool pics from both of you. They definately can be forced to form a caudex. I will take a pic of mine for a positive ID soon. Thanks for the help.
C

Baja California, Mexico(Zone 11)

I don't think there's much forcing or raising to be done for most medusoid Euphorbias. Over time the lower branches die off and then you get to see a "trunk" in there more clearly. But even young plants can have a pretty obvious caudex, most of which is above ground. Some medusas are more ground-hugging than others (esculenta and inermis for example), just as a part of how they grow. So they'll have a different posture because of that. But in general the caudex automatically grows as each new arm is added to the head. In my experience these plants grow fatter (and less leggy) in strong light, up to day-long full sun.

Arlington, TX

I am afraid to put plants in full sun here. Many times I have tried and they have died! I wasn't aware this plant could take that much sun but will certainly move it to a sunnier spot to try.

Port Elizabeth, South Africa(Zone 10a)

Baja is right, in the sense that more sun/light will result in less leggy growth in most plants, the last plant is in direct sun for most of the day and I am actually interested to see what the difference will be, all the growth in the centre is new since I planted it but also similar to previous years, I guess the question is if its going to grow as long as the previous or not, time will tell. My #2 pic is still getting 4-5 hours morning sun at this stage.

Baja California, Mexico(Zone 11)

This is a flanaganii that's growing in day-long sun. Its crested kin and the other medusas here receive half-day (morning) sun.

Thumbnail by Baja_Costero
Arlington, TX

That is not the plant I have but the color is sublime. Summers here are hot both day and night, with little relief. Only the toughest plants do well in full sun here.

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