SOLVED: Is this a Weed??

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Hi,
I have a plant growing in my raised bed that I'm not familiar with and assume it's a weed or other invasive. I haven't noticed it anywhere else in the yard, though it's possible there's more of it that I've missed.

I've held off pulling it out because I planted a bunch of perennials last year & some have been slow to come up. Most are different cultivars of plants I'm already familiar with, but there are some new ones mixed in.

I figure it's probably something common & I want to try to find out before it spreads since it looks like it's about to open buds or seed heads.

Anybody know what this is?

Thumbnail by nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Here's another picture:

Thumbnail by nutsaboutnature
Burien, WA(Zone 7b)

Does it flower yellow? If so, it could be Geum macrophyllum.

Paradise, CA(Zone 9a)

It looks to me like it's either a Frangaria (strawberry) plant or the groundcover plant Duchesnea indica. The only way I can easily tell them apart is by the flowers, Frangaria having white flowers, and Duchesnea (which is not edible) having yellow flowers.

Paradise, CA(Zone 9a)

There are also several wild north american Frangaria, which are still edible, like the Virginia Strawberry and California Wood Strawberry
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/309159/
http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/fragaria-californica

Here are some images of cultivated strawberries (Fragaria var. ananassa):
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/31463/

This message was edited Jun 15, 2011 10:19 AM

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

It's Potentilla norvegica.

Burien, WA(Zone 7b)

Hmmmm.... I feel like the pattern of the viens on the leafs do not look like frageria or Duchesnea.

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Hi everyone,
Thank you all so much for your helpful answers. They have helped me quite a bit to determine a few things. The first being that it's nothing I planted.

I looked up each of your suggestions & they all look similar, though the Potentilla Norvegica looks the closest. They all appear to be in the Strawberry family & my first thought when it noticed it growing was that it reminded me of Strawberry plants, but larger.

I also forgot to post the size of the plant & leaves & as soon as it stops raining I'll go measure.

I think I'm going to let it grow just a little longer & possibly see what color the blooms are so I'll leave the thread open for now.

Our subdivision sits right along a nature trail for walking/bicycling & It's possible it came from there or the other surrounding native plant areas. It appears this might be a native based on the info I've found, though this area does also have invasives in various forms (even trees).

I doubt that I'll leave the plant where it is even if it's a native since my space is limited & I don't want it to spread all over, but I may decide to put it in a pot just to see what it does or if birds will eat any berries.

Thanks again.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

It is definitely not a strawberry, if that helps...

Elizabethton, TN(Zone 6b)

This stuff is quite invasive and spreads without any help. It showed up in a separate hosta bed of mine, and even with landscape sheeting and mulch on the ground, it has taken over the hostas. Fortunately, it removes easily, but is a pain since there is so much of it.

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Thanks altagardener. Thanks femluc. . .that's all I needed to hear. Just in the last two days of rain it's nearly doubled.

I've decided to remove it. . . Thanks everyone for your help!!

Paradise, CA(Zone 9a)

It looks like Duchesnea indica was recently reclassified as Potentilla indica, so it too is part of the cinqfoil family:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mock_strawberry

So it was likely Potentilla of one sort or another :).

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Everything I can see in the photos fits Potentilla norvegica. An examination of the stipules at the base of the leaf petioles should distinguish P. norvegica from Duchesnea indica:

http://www.missouriplants.com/Yellowalt/Duchesnea_indica_page.html

http://www.missouriplants.com/Yellowalt/Duchesnea_indica_page.html

The large stipules of P. norvegica are visible in the second photo; the leafy inflorescense is also distinctive.

Paradise, CA(Zone 9a)

Thank you altagardener, it is very helpful to have images of parts of both plants to compare! I think one of the links above you meant to have as:
http://www.missouriplants.com/Yellowalt/Potentilla_norvegica_page.html

After seeing these images, I am inclined to agree that it is probably norvegica, though I have had indica in my yard as a groundcover (inherited and since removed), and it looks remarkably more similar than the first image on the missouriplants link would lend one to believe. I saw upon looking it up when you first mentioned it, that the leafy inflorescense is very disctive on norvegica, but we have no inflorescense to compare among the images provided. It is always nice to learn about new plants I am unfamiliar with, even if they are weeds :).

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Perhaps I should have said "congested or leafy upper growth (where the inflorescense will eventually appear)" rather than refer to the inflorescense that's not yet developed! ;-)

Thanks for correcting that link.

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Wow...Thanks ogon & altagardener!

Even though I closed the link, maybe I'll still post some more pics to help all of us. It's really becoming interesting...

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Okay. . .
I said I would take some measurements & a few more pics so you guys could have fun with it. Either way the plant is coming out in the next day or two as I'm uncomfortable with it as well as the rate at which it's growing.

Following are several pics at different angles. The approx. height so far is 22". The largest leaves are 3-1/2 to 4" in length & 2 to 2-1/2" in width.

Thumbnail by nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Next:

Thumbnail by nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Next:

Thumbnail by nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

And:

Thumbnail by nutsaboutnature
Paradise, CA(Zone 9a)

Yikes, that'a big boy! Definitely now Strawberry or Potentilla indica, both of which can be somewhat upright, but are more groundcovers. I would undoubtedly agree with Potentilla norvegica at this point :).

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