Moving Oriental Poppies

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

Is it time to move Oriental Poppies?
I am assuming: good drainage, full sun and amongst another plant like a daylily to cover up the dried foliage and give the O P support.

Albany, ME(Zone 4b)

I think the timing is fine. But be very careful to dig really deeply. Poppies have a long, long tap root.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

If this is an established plant, it will often be impossible to get the entire root (without a backhoe, that is - the roots go very deep) - you'll probably find it coming back in the same spot.
So, yes, dig deeply. Other, than that, they're really hard to kill. The moved plant may look bad for a while, but will probably recover, broken roots notwithstanding.

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

Thanks for the advice. I thought the above to be true, but wanted to make sure before I moved them. These popies are a year old-bloomed first time this spring.

Kiowa, CO(Zone 5b)

Any brokens roots found can be laid sideways close to the surface (1-2" down) and they will sprout new plants. Also they go dormant in summer after bloom til lt. summer-e. fall when new leaves appear... Also can throw any seed and hope for new babies.... Kathy

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

Do Orientals re-seed like the annuals?

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

They certainly do seed themselves, though less generously, seemingly, than the annuals that depend on seeding for continued existence.

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

Makes sense.
Thanks.

(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

I have Princess Victoria Louise that used to have tons of flowers. This year only one. I wonder If I should dug up the clump (as much as one can) and replant in different places. Or simply dig up and then keep digging up volunteers. I dug up an orange one several years ago and I still get volunteers from the roots. I finally decided that they were rather messy flowers, the pretty pink petals would be strewn with black from the stamen and would flop open very soon after blooming. I have decided to dedicate the front bed to dahlias, lilies and some short perennials that bloom early and with deadheading bloom on and off through summer. Better spacing and arrangement to make it more eye appealing rather than a hodgepodge that looks like a mess not a garden.

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

So, I guess you're saying you are not real happy with oriental poppies? Too messy?

(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

Yeah. I guess so. And then up here after blooming they start going dead from the bottom up so all in all they are less than attractive. I guess if my garden configuration was different I could figure out something to put in front to hide the mess. Guess there are too many other lovely plants that stay lovely even after blooming to devote SF to the orientals.

Kiowa, CO(Zone 5b)

You can plant O. Poppies inbetween ie. daylilies to help hide the dying foliage. They can make a beautiful patch if allowed... Kathy

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Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

I plan to plant them among some of my daylilies. I also have Lycoris squamigera (Resurrection Lilies) among these daylilies. They border my yard next to the road. So, I will have Oriental Poppies bloom, then Daylilies, then Resurrection Lilies.

Kiowa, CO(Zone 5b)

Sounds pretty!!!!! Let us see pix when you get it planted!!! You know how we crave pix!!!!

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

Kathy, thanks for the encouragement. Sometimes, I am not sure about my ideas.

(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

Ohhhh, you are sooooo not alone.

Hazel Crest, IL(Zone 5a)

I will always grow OP, just for the beauty of them in the spring. Some are stronger than others. Mike

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(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

I don't argue that they are stunningly lovely and have their own kind of beauty. If I had a garden with an area just for OP, I would grow them. Maybe that is the problem. Somehow I need to hide the 'leftovers'. Do you find that the plants peter out after a while. I have had Princess Victoria Louise for several years and this year had only one blossom from two plants. I can see they would get pretty crowded but transplanting the small 'suckers' while it can be done is difficult.

Albany, ME(Zone 4b)

I plant late lilies or dahlias in front of poppies. Sometimes I move in grandiflora delphs from a "work" garden area after they have gone dormant.

(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

I have only one 'deep' bed that could manage that. Most are only around 2' in depth so not much room to plant in front. On the other hand cutting down the poppy as it becomes ugly and unruly wouldn't kill it and you could put a pot of iris or lilies all but on top of it for the remainder of the summer.

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

I have been making some plans for my gardens next year. I keep telling myself you can't have Every Plant! There's just not room in my gardens for every thing. So, basically, I am choosing plants that are "durable".
Having a 2 foot deep garden would be limiting.
I have transplanted my Oriental Poppies. I probably had 20. I hope some of them will make it.

(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

I have no doubt they will. I moved some and just scooped a reasonable amount of soil with the roots which are not very deep and they did okay. Plus they continue to send up plants where the original plant was no matter how much I did.

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

These were in raised beds that rec'd a lot of rain and were watered-so the roots weren't that deep.

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