Bald Faced Hornet Nest

Cedarhome, WA(Zone 8b)

While watering my deck planters, I've been noticing some fairly aggressive baldies buzzing me. Today, while weeding in my below-deck garden, I spotted their nest in the deck girders directly below my planters. Left in a hurry. Any easy way (other than chemical warfare) to get rid of these nasty creatures? I've read they will abandon the nest this fall, so perhaps I just wait them out knowing where they live. We don't get a lot of these buggers in my neck of the woods.

Union, WA(Zone 8b)

Some areas have bee guys that will come and remove nests. There were wasps building in my back porch light fixture. I put saran wrap over the bottom and left it there. One died inside and the others have finally quit coming around.

South Beach, OR(Zone 9a)

We had a nest too when we bought the place. I just left them alone and they left during the rainy season. Took the nest down after they were gone.

Cedarhome, WA(Zone 8b)

I got some random information from another web site to mix 1-2 T Bronners castile soap with water in a 16 oz spray container, supposedly will outright kill the wasps. Sounds too good to be true, but I'm going to give it a whirl. Worth a try, and if it doesn't work, I'm can just use the soap with no poisons to dispose of.

Twisp, WA

Greg sprayed aerosol glue in the opening of a nest one time at night while they were inside. It sealed up the hole so they couldn't get out and then we cut the branch off and disposed of the whole thing. Probably wouldn't work under the deck like that though. They are all still alive in there and very angry, so it's a little dangerous. If you can try to live with them, they will go away in the fall and the empty nests are way cool to hang somewhere, plus they eat yellow jackets. If they're really aggressive, I'd get rid of them - their sting packs a nasty punch and they can get territorial about the nest. We've got a few of those buzzing around but they're not a problem this year. The yellow jackets however....

Cedarhome, WA(Zone 8b)

I've been just staying away from the nest, but Gary had one fly up the leg of his shorts (no sting fortunately) so he's hell-bent on poisoning the whole colony. I haven't noticed any yellow jackets, maybe the baldies have been keeping them away. Not a bad trade-off now that I know where the baldies' nest is.

Bellevue, WA(Zone 8a)

I took a class from Ciscoe Morris about bugs. Bald faced wasps lay eggs on the heads of caterpillars, which hatch, and enter the caterpillar's body behind the head and begins to consume the internal organs. The caterpillar stops feeding and is eventually killed by the hornet parasite. Gruesome, but I'll bet you didn't have a caterpillar problem this year!

The circle of life...oh la la!

Rose Lodge, OR(Zone 8b)

I think bonehead left the site. But I am unable to understand why they couldn't live with the baldies. They aren't that big a deal. I have several nests here & kind of like to watch them do their thing. I sometimes bemoan the lack of a big guy to do big stuff around here, but thank goodness I do not have to put up with their proclivities & insistence on killing thingz.

There was one nest near my stepz from the back deck to the meadow this summer & it was so close that they stung one of my catz & made me nervous on the part of unsuspecting guests (lots of landscaperz & house-sitters & cleaning people run through here) so I tried to harass them into leaving, by chunking wood at the hole several times a day (yes, I'm a genius). My last, effective, trick was to pour a 5-gallon bucket of water into their hole after they had come home for the evening. Unfortunately, I believe that made the nest cave in & they all drowned. I feel bad about that. But for those of you who feel a need to fight them forevermore, try that.

Union, WA(Zone 8b)

Good idea summer. I crushed in a nest by my front door once. That worked.

Hi in2art, I like Cisco too. Oh la la indeed.

Twisp, WA

Summerkid, Have you ever had a nest of aggressive baldies around the house? They can get very territorial when establishing their nest and will sting unprovoked. It's not fun.I ended up in the emergency room one time. That being said, I too co-exist when everyone is willing to be reasonable. Sometimes it's hard to come to an understanding with the little buggers.

Springfield, OR(Zone 8a)

I have heard, though not specific to baldies, that because wasps are so territorial the presence of "someone else's" nest will cause them to go elsewhere to build. Thus the selling of fake, look-alike wasp nests.
I have also noticed that even after the taking down of a nest they are not persuaded to go elsewhere; I always find a new nest in the same location very quickly. I'm thinking to try the fake nest strategy where there is always a nest, by the door of my studio. I probably won't know anything 'til next June or July, but if that means I won't be hosting these small uninvited visitors, well, hallelujah!
I'll try to remember to report back.
I wonder too if an actual nest of another type of wasp would work.
Hmm, this approach kinda reminds me of aikido -- using the attacker's own energy (or territoriality) to defeat him/her/it.

Rose Lodge, OR(Zone 8b)

Never, Lauribob, not in 51 yearz minus 5 dayz of living & gardening on farms, ranches, in cities, in suburbz, in the woods. Not in Montana, Florida, Pennsylvania, Illinois or Oregon. I've certainly been stung by wasps, hornets, honeybees & who knows what else over the decades, but never unprovoked. A few stingz certainly do not put me in the ER, so I'm certainly sorry that you suffer that fate. I was stung 11 times one night while messing with my honeybees when I was a novice apiarist & should have left the thing till morning, but even that was just mildly uncomfortable for a day or so.

Union, WA(Zone 8b)

Y arelucky with the bee stings. And Happy Birthday?

Rose Lodge, OR(Zone 8b)

Yes, thanks Willow! My honey is here for THREE WEEKS and has let slip that he might be open to moving to Oregon rather than dragging me back to the flatlands soooooo ... wish me luck. That would be a helluva birthday present. Also, we are hoping to cross pathz with Maury on our way up to tour a boat-building school (something he's interested in) north of Seattle (Port Haddock? Hadlock?).

Aside from the fact that I am nearly FIFTY-ONE, life lookz very very good right now. I hope you feel the same!

Union, WA(Zone 8b)

Hi Summer, Oh I hope you do get to stay in Oregon. Crossing everything. Would love to go see Maury again. Hope you have a great time. She is so sweet.
Fifty-one sounds young to me. I will soon be 74. Don't feel as bad as I look thank heavens. LOL

Bellevue, WA(Zone 8a)

Summerkid, I think maybe you had something other than bald faced wasps, they are paper nest builders and don't live in the ground.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bald-faced_hornet

I am 55 years young and going strong. Work full time and garden almost as much. Currently have 3 major landscaping projects in progress. Two garden bed overhauls, one with rockery/fence/steps rebuild, and another to create a 'desert garden' area using steel pipe remnants as 'pots'

Springfield, OR(Zone 8a)

Happy New Year summerkid! I too hope you get to stay in Oregon; that would be a heckuva gift!
Happy new year to you
Happy new year to you
Happy new year dear.......

Cheers!
Turtle

Rose Lodge, OR(Zone 8b)

Turtle, you are so sweet.
in2art, pix please! (I think we will be driving past you to get to Port Hadlock?)
And yes, I have no idea what kind of hornet-y thingz these are in the ground. There is one nest of yellow stripes and the one I accidentally caved in were white striped.

Union, WA(Zone 8b)

Smetimes bumblebee types nest in the ground also.

Rose Lodge, OR(Zone 8b)

Yeah, but not in highly populated nests like that, right? And these are definitely wasps/hornetz. I really should log off & go look them up, no excuse for not knowing the difference.

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