What is this style of love seat?

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

I bought 2 upholstered barrel chairs off craigslist for $50.00 The elderly couple were moving and they asked me if I wanted this love seat (free). The movers were scheduled for the next AM and they needed this gone.
The barrel chairs are upholstered in a cotton fabric that resembles the polished cotton dress our daughter wore for her Confirmation in the 80's. The style of this love seat screams 80's to me. I am going to flip it over and see if I can cut off the lower 5-7 " and attach legs of some sort.
The "channel" like treatment that runs the length of the arms to bottom is called what?

My plan is to re-upholster both the chairs and this love seat.

Thumbnail by anastatia Thumbnail by anastatia
Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I'm no help but would like to see what you come up with.

I guessing (wildly, no experience) that there are rough legs under the fabric channeling- thne no clue as to whats inside the rest of the base to make that curved part.

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

The guy who did some upholstering for me 8-9+ yrs ago repeatedly offered to help me w/ learning the trade. He may be retired. I have his # and will call him to see if he is available to give me free advice (assuming this old # still works).

Dover AFB, DE(Zone 7a)

?Stacked Piping? Multiple Piping?

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

No it is not piping or welting as they call it in upholstery world. It is a type of channeling; very narrow.
this photo is of a channeled back chair

Thumbnail by anastatia
Dover AFB, DE(Zone 7a)

It looks like a puffier Tuck and Roll that automotive upholsterers use.

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

Tuck and Roll? I will look that up. thank you.

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

JuneyBug, have you done auto upholstery?
Tuck and Roll looks very similar to channeling.

Dover AFB, DE(Zone 7a)

No, but I used to watch my neighbor do it. He even got some business from a few of the area furniture stores when a piece came in that was in need of repair. It's so interesting to watch/help when someone is taking raw materials and turning them into high-end custom upholstery. It looks so easy when experts do it ^_^

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

JuneyBug, that was very interesting. I love to watch how things are made. It does loo easy; I know there's lots of practice and boo boos to learn anything.

Dover AFB, DE(Zone 7a)

That's what scares me away from doing any upholstery - it looks so easy, but there must be a big 'learning curve'.

Central FL, FL(Zone 9b)

Anastasia, I just came across your thread, and I'm so hoping you didn't cut the legs off this loveseat! This is very reminiscent of the Art Deco style, and I think it would be a shame to change it. (Of course, if you don't like it, you don't like it.) The trim isn't the tuck and roll used in automobile upholstery. It appears to be simply multiple rows of welting, the size between the regular small welt, and the jumbo welt which can be up to an inch in diameter. I've never seen welting done in more than a double row, and I think this multiple application adds a unique decorative touch. Getting this free was a real score!

Even though your home isn't Art Deco style, a bit of clever decorating can make this loveseat work into an eclectic setting. I hope you'll post pictures of your chairs and however the loveseat is now.

You're right, JuneyBug. Upholstery isn't a DIY project for an untrained amateur. It takes time and professional training to learn this artisanal skill well. The upholsterer I use is so good that he can build upholstered pieces from scratch just by looking at a photo. He built some very unusual chairs for an out-of-state designer, and they ended up on a tv interview during the Olympics.

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

bivbiv, I have not touched this love seat. It is still waiting for help. You are right, this is welting.
the white fabric is faded in spots and stained in others so it must be replaced. It is very comfortable to sit on.
thank you for chiming in.

I had an upholsterer cover my old (1930-40's) sofa that was experienced and talented. He was very talented in anything furniture. He put new veneer on an old table (not mine).

Central FL, FL(Zone 9b)

Oh, I'm so glad you haven't changed this loveseat! I hope you'll reconsider about putting legs on it. Have you any idea of the kind of fabric you'll use on it, color, etc.?

A skilled upholsterer is worth his weight in gold. Years ago I had some work done by a fellow who had been in business for years in a nearby small town and had a good reputation. However, after I saw his workmanship on my furniture, I couldn't understand how he'd earned that reputation. Welt on a chair was very badly done, and I wasn't pleased with anything because his work, in general, really looked sloppy. He covered a chair, made and covered a bench seat cushion for a loveseat, as well as pillows for it. On the work order, I specified welt for the pillows; but he didn't add welt even though there was plenty of fabric. The worst thing was a fitted spread I had him make for a twin bed (all this was for the guest room). This is a built-in bed with drawers under it for extra storage. I said I wanted the spread made like a fitted sheet with elastic at the corners to it would be easy to put on the bed. No elastic! So it was really hard to make the bed. Worst of all, somehow he managed to tear a slit in the bedspread (it was a thin, faux silk), and he patched it with an iron-on patch on the back of it. Of course, this stuck out like a sore thumb! Had this been an accident done by my present upholsterer, he would have bought more fabric and made another bedspread. Not this guy! He had my MC number because I paid him a deposit even before he started. No upholsterer should ever ask for a deposit before the work is done. That should have made my antennae go up! When he put the balance on my card, I protested to MC that one piece was completely unacceptable, and the others should at least be discounted. I lost that one because they said he'd done the work so had to be paid. It didn't matter that he ruined the bedspread. I still have the same bed, but the room has been completely redecorated to coordinate with the different style I have in the rest of the downstairs.

I hope the fellow who covered your old sofa is still around.

Vancouver, WA(Zone 8a)

bivbiv, are the fabric covered legs an Art Deco style?

Central FL, FL(Zone 9b)

The whole sofa, including legs, reminds me of Art Deco; and I think the welting adds to that look. I really don't think cutting the legs off and adding a different style would make the loveseat more attractive. Rather, I think it would be mixing apples and oranges and destroying its style.

Central FL, FL(Zone 9b)

Anastasia, I should add that many Art Deco sofas have wood legs, or even metal ones. It's just that I think this design looks good as is. If you cut the legs off and add another style, I kind of doubt the welting would look as distinctive as it does now; so if I were you, I'd get rid of that, too, if I changed the legs.

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