So, what are you reading 2015, June 21

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Coming from two threads..
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1036836/
and
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1356525/


let's chat about our current reads. I know I've gotten some good suggestions here! Far from the Madding Crowds is one that's got me interested. I've also just picked up a memoir from a refugee of the Armenian genocide.
http://www.amazon.com/Four-Years-Mountains-Kurdistan-Armenian/dp/1940210062

This message was edited Jun 21, 2015 11:37 AM

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

I finished Far From The Madding Crowd so I am now playing catch-up with all the Time Magazines and the New Yorkers.
My daughter is coming up to see her Dad for Father's Day. She called and said she would be late because her significant other and her son went trout fishing and were really close to catching their limit so she's bringing us some trout for supper.
I'll give her some of our strawberries.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Sally, aren't you wonderful! I was stuck with a tablet all week and not able to figure out how to cut and paste. Thanks for starting this badly needed and more timely thread. But I am now one with my laptop (phew) and can better carry on. I'm very interested in your comments and opinion of this Haigaz book in view of my understanding that Haigaz was considered an Armenian Jew (like William and Aram Saroyan, BTW) and the genocide was Christian.

Now more than a quarter done with American Pastoral, I am immersed in a debate/argument about the Vietnam war. Roth is using a writing technique that I'm not sure of but it's definitely based on Greek philosophy and debate. Maybe Sophism. An indulgent father and his privileged, radical activist daughter are having an ongoing feud about the Vietnam war. Each argument is labeled Conversation # and then a number. The reader has a sense of a timeline based on references in the arguments but the book moves from argument to argument which ends up being a huge debate between a precocious sixteen year old and her thirty seven year old father about adolescent angst, family dysfunction, patriotism and war. The arguments cover a lot of ground when it come to parenting adolescents. I was at the same age and same stage at the time so he's totally holding me hostage.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

woodspirit- sounds delicious. I'd be happy to wait for the trout! I grabbed three New Yorkers out of our resale pile; they are thus six months old but that doesn't matter.

Laurel, it sounds unusual and I can understand how you'd be really grabbed by the characters and format. I love when a book does that.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Goodness, you guys read some very deep, serious stuff! Me, I finally finished reading the "Rama" series a few days ago, and then spent 1 1/2 days on Stephen King's "Finders Keepers". Sometimes I just need a good "loose" read, just for the enjoyment of it. =)

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)


Four Years in the Mountains of Kurdistan: An Armenian Boy's Memoir of Survival

is an easy read. Not that much detail (politically) in the events, but a retelling the way a teenage boy experienced it, after his family had fled. He became a servant in a 'bey's household, since he was underage (not killed as an adult male Armenian). Descriptions of rural life in Kurdistan, some lovely scenes of the countryside at night, not intense or graphic so far about violence. I picked it up because we have an International Baccalaureate program in a high school here and one grade is supposed to read a book about someone growing up in a different country.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Ohh, that sounds very interesting. DD has an IB with double higher levels (like a double major) in 3D Art and Foriegn Languages (3). Fabulous program but rigorous is not the half of it.

Can't remember today's BookBub freebie but it's supposed to be light detective humor by an awarded writer. I downloaded it. Still with American Pastoral though the book hoarding continues.

*Edited to add: Tony Dunbar, Crooked Man. Free on Amazon.



This message was edited Jun 25, 2015 1:21 PM

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Ohh, that sounds very interesting. DD has an IB with double higher levels (like a double major) in 3D Art and Foriegn Languages (3).

holy cow. I heard about the workload when the program came here.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

SO really liked Diologues Of A Crime by John K. Manos. It was a Kirkus winner for Indie book of the year. SO read it a while back and says it's unusual and suspenseful. It's available today for free on BookBub or Amazon. There actually are a few interesting reads popping up on BookBub each week. Glad I didn't dump it.

Halfway through American Pastoral.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Laurel, how would one go about finding out what the "freebies of the day" are on amazon, please? I have a Kindle (old, 2nd generation) and I'm thinking it's about time I started getting more books again - it's been a while.

As for what I'm reading now... welllll... there's this mid-sized series that's been showing on FX, "The Strain", by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan. Season 2 is about to begin this Sunday. That reminded me that I have all 3 books on my Kindle, so I've begun re-reading the series again.
There I go again, reading that "nothing too deep" stuff. ;)

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

A book site called BookBub has a sign up for daily deals. They offer one or two free books each day. Google it. You sign in and create a profile of your reading preferences. You can alter the profile at any time. At the bottom display of each of the books available are options to download through one or more sources and you click on the source you would like to use, like Amazon, when you "buy" a book. Amazon is the most frequent route offered. The catch is that the books may not be available the next day so jump on anything that looks interesting. Amazon Prime people have lots of freebies but you don't need to pay any membership to BookBub or Amazon for these deals. You do need a basic Amazon account to download to your Kindle. My Samsung has a Kindle reader and others so I have a few options.

I finished American Pastoral. It was heavy and I keep thinking about it. I'm on to Project Moses, by Robert Love, a mystery thriller series featuring Enzo Lee. He is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist. This was a BookBub freebie. Short and uncomplicated which is a nice break.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

That's fantastic, thank you Laurel! I just signed up and found a few interesting things that are now on their way to my Kindle. You are the bees' knees!! =) Oh, and my apologies for being so late to wish you a (belated) HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

DH bought me a Toshiba Chromebook to replace an ailing Dell laptop. So I'll be exploring Google books / Google Play books, or something. I also need to practice my library's ebooks- had a guy on the phone today asking for help, and I struggled through it by logging in on the library computer with my personal account while he tried to see the same pages on his account at home, on a book he checked out.

Finishing Laura Lippmann Hush Hush, similar to another of hers I had just finished- a woman with a shocking event in her past 'resurfaces' and those around struggle with whether she is lying or manipulating things. Much as I like Laura, this was not one of her most creative, in the sense that this major premise was recycled.

Next up, Sherman Alexie War Dances
http://www.amazon.com/War-Dances-Sherman-Alexie/dp/0802144896

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Thanks for the wishes, Speedie. Enjoy. I've been sticking to the free ones 'cause I've got a list of heavier fare downloaded.

Sally, BookBub also has some free Google books. Your new read looks provoking. My latest choice was based on a call for standby jury duty and finding a story I could follow while sitting in a crowded room.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I'm playing with my library's e-books links to practice so I can advise our patrons. One of them (Overdrive) lets me read on the chromebook, the other (3M) seems only to go to an app on devices like Android and kindle... takes some work getting to a book this way.

Oh, tickled to say I will be on Collection Committee. I will help nominate some books for Summer Reading next year. Should be interesting; it's one of the few committees people really seem to enjoy.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Started a sample of Stone Mattress by Margaret atwood, while exploring e books. It will be high on my list to read.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

So sore from PT I'm sleepless. Guess it's good for getting in extra reading. I'm halfway through Project Moses. The mystery involves a secret genetic engineering project. The type that induces posting hysteria here. lol

Sally, that's great that you get to help pick books for the library. You're so right about committee work though. It's usually a thankless job. I've not heard of that Atwood book. LMK. As for anything tech related, I rely heavily on SO.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Oh goodness Laurel, you really were Sleepless In Cleveland, huh? :( I hope you are feeling better this afternoon, and that your PT is helping you.

That book sounds really wonderful, I'm going to have to add that one to my list as well... be right back....okey dokey, done. Upon reading the little write-up about it, there's just one thing that may "turn me off" so to speak, and that's the "romance" aspect of it. Do you find the romance part of it to be overly sappy and.. well, stupid? To be perfectly honest, it's the predictability and stupidity that make me dislike romance novels; in other books, it's ok as long as it's not over-done.

Sally, congratulations on getting to join that committee!! It really does sound very enjoyable. May I make a suggestion for an interesting summer read? I really REALLY enjoyed "The Goldfinch", by Donna Tartt. Yes, I know I've mentioned it before, but I feel it bears another mention, it really had me sucked in from page 1 and kept me there through many wee-hour mornings until the end.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Speedie, I'm actually in Atlanta until Sat. but will be at the cottage in Cleveland, GA come Sat.. The objective of PT is to tear up adhesions in my shoulders without having to do it surgically. One side is not bad but the other is terrible. I spend more than two hours a day either exercising or icing. Baby steps. The reward for the pain is reading for twenty minute snatches while icing down. I downloaded the Goldfinch as soon as you mentioned it but was saving it for a serious read. As for Project Moses, the romance part came in at the halfway point. After brief torrid sex from a male point of view they are a couple. Hardly smoking.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

We've still not eaten but the grill is lit and we've been having an interesting book discussion. Sally, I mentioned Stone Mattress to SO and he says he's been wanting to read that for some time. Pardon me if I add his thoughts here now and again. He has good taste in books though our interests diverge. I've always been a reader but early on he was not. A corporate career meant business on both coasts and lots of time flying. So now he buries me in books though I have the broader classics background and am a fast reader. When you mention books I ask him if he knows them right off.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Goldfinch has been very popular! I don't take common opinions seriously, but I do take yours guyses opinions to heart.

I neglected to say, this committee is for 'student' summer reading, lol. Grade school and middle school. maybe high school? not sure. probably a lot of this
http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/notalists/ncb

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

Sorry, I've been to busy with the 4-H kids' project at the museum. Now that school's out, my time with them will be different, starting tomorrow.
I've been reading "American History in 50 Events" by James Weston. These are significant events that changed our history. I am a historian but it's nice to read something short and specific and gives enough information so there is an overall view. I recommend it.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Sounds good woodspirit!

Oliver Sacks has a new biography out. His books are fascinating.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

SO read and liked "Don't Know Much About History" a while back. I finished Project Moses while icing my shoulder this morning. It was engaging, light entertainment with an unexpectedly complex ending in re: drama and ethics. That boosts my opinion of the work. Definitely in the noir literary genre complete with pay phones and typewriters. Now to tackle "Goldfinch".

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

Sally, I didn't finish with a follow-up back in June. My grandson and daughter brought 7 wonderful trout that he caught. How's that for a first serious fishing trip. They hiked quite a ways to a stream which the significant other keeps secret. We ate 4 and froze 3. They'll be on the menu again soon.
It's hot and muggy here. A bit unusual but nothing like living in Savannah, which I loved.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

It's great that she can go fishing. Our dad took us fishing a number of times, on the Bay or Rappahannock River in rowboat with an outboard, or off the dock. Toadfish, ugh!

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

I used to love the fishing trips my Dad used to take me on; just me and him, heading out at dark:thirty with thermoses of hot chocolate and a tin full of freshly made homemade peanut butter cookies that Mom made for us. Aaaah, such fond memories! :) Really important for a young teen, for Daddy/Daughter time.

Laurel, so excited that you're ready to tackle The Goldfinch, can't wait to hear updates. :) I have no idea why that book really just grabbed me so much, but it did!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

We have a stocked pond at Maypop with large mouth bass, blue gill and catfish. It's spring and creek fed so it won't support trout which like cold, fast running river water. Our kids (two boys and a girl) grew up fishing with Dad. When he wanted to get out on the rivers for a day of trout fishing it was always daughter who was most eager. We still visit those favorite trout streams now and again. It's a country version of a day at the beach. I bring a book to read and collect interesting river rocks for my garden borders and to make plant labels. We have a picnic. We don't have horses anymore but I gave SO a telescoping rod one Father's Day and waders another. He was so into fishing that our bathroom at Maypop is trout fishing themed with the t-paper in a creel next to the potty. lol

I've started "Goldfinch" and like the style right off but have been extra tired what with doing work in the kitchen garden and out on the property in the heat. Looking forward to gaining momentum.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Oh Laurel, what wonderful wonderful family memories!!! Heck, I'd take that setting over a beach ANY day of the week, so much more peaceful and relaxing, and waayy more beautiful. Heeheee, love the "Loo Theme", and putting the TP on a creel!? Hahahaaa, brilliant!

I am in between books at the moment; I'd started to re-read "The Strain" series, but since we're watching it on TV I'm not really into the books... can't decide what should be next. I've gotten several from BookBub (left my Kindle out in the truck over-night, DARN!), so I'll leaf through the new selection and let y'all know what I choose. :)

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

We came back to Atlanta and an unexpected houseful of kids and grands. Two fun days though lots of hash slinging going on with all these bottomless pit boys. I've got work tomorrow and we'll be back to Maypop by Friday so they'll have to fend for themselves. I sure have looked forward to tucking in with "Goldfinch" after the kitchen is closed.

I took some photos of the trout bathroom and will share soon.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Oh goodie, thank you!!

I've begun a fun book (thank you again Laurel... got it via BookBub),... I think it's called "Insanity in Wonderland", or something like that. There's Wonderland monsters in the real world, and Carter Pillar (AKA: Caterpillar), who is in an insane asylum, has to bring back Alice's memories of Wonderland (Alice also being locked away in the same asylum) back so she can solve a killing-spree crime. Very interesting... and Mad! =)

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

Believe it or not, I'm reading the Anne of Green Gables series. Though I did not start off life as an orphan, our family did live in cities, often in the hotels my Dad managed. So. No yard, no neighborhood friends, no home cooking. When I read Anne, I felt like her when she got to Green Gables, instead of living in an orphanage.We had moved from NYC to Savannah and the owners of the hotel insisted that our family live elsewhere. We found a simple house but it was on a tidal creek and there were several family homes. I actually had friends, a yard, a pet (parakeet) and the delights of woods and countryside. I always go by there when I get down to Savannah.
It will take me awhile to read the whole series because I have just learned that there were more books written in it than I knew.

Thumbnail by woodspirit1
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I have happy but foggy memories of "Ann Of Green Gables". Fun and relaxing. My mom managed hotel and restaurant kitchens and dining rooms so I too spent time on the scene (but out of the way) as a child. I relate to being an orphan as an only child until mid-teens with chronically absentee parents. We lived on Miami Beach in very dense housing. My parents eventually bought a home and all my dreams came true when I was allowed to get a dog. Since they both worked I was sent to camp quite young and from practically the time school got out until it started again. We used to round robin books like crazy at camp and there was a pretty good library comprised of tattered books left by campers at the end of each summer.

I'm a bit past halfway on "Goldfinch". Theo is back in N.Y. and attending early college. A fabulous book that, despite its length, has a beautiful flow. It definitely earned that Pulitzer.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I always loved Anne of Green Gables. I think I've read everything in the series, as well as some of Montgomery's other books. Jane of Lantern Hill is a perennial favorite of mine.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

never read Anne of GG...

Belfield, ND(Zone 4a)

I'm reading book three 'Return' in the Redemption Series of the Baxter Family drama. I'll be reading about the Baxters for quite some time, as there are 22 or more books in all the different Baxter Family series.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Sally, I have never read that one either, seems there's one more Classic to add to my Kindle.

Joan, I've never heard of that .. series? Saga? That sure is a lot of books though, and after a bit of peeking around online, I see there's yet another grouping (gaggle?) of books to go on my wishlist.

I'm currently trying to be careful to not actually buy books right now 'cause I've got a birthday coming up and DH pays very close attention to what my current yen is. ;)

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I've seen Karen Kingsbury's many books on the shelf but never knew if it was one series, or several. Popular writer, I mentioned her to a teen when we didn't have any of the teen inspirational she was looking for.

Belfield, ND(Zone 4a)

A friend is absolutely in love with the Baxter family series. I was a bit overwhelmed and didn't know where to even start. She gave me this link that explains the order they should be read. That helped ease my anxiety enough to start them.
http://www.eden.co.uk/blog/The-Baxter-Family-Karen-Kingsburys-epic-5-series-22-book-saga-of-life-changing-fiction-p1158

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I had never heard of the series so I looked it up. Is your friend loaning you the books, Joan? That would be convenient.

Having mentioned the complexity of my new car manuals on another thread perhaps some time reading those epics are in order. Not just one, and not at all inspirational, they are a series.

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or register to post.

Upload Images to your reply

    You may upload up to 5 images
    BACK TO TOP