So, what are you reading 2015, June 21

Grove City, OH

I just read Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS. This book is well researched and very well written, given the dense nature of the subject matter. Warrick takes great pains to not only report thoroughly, but tell a great story about psychopathic terrorist Zarqawi and the rise of Isis. I appreciated the insights from those on the inside, the ones who knew the most but were never heard from publicly--CIA analysts, the Mukhabarat, Iraqi tribal leaders, diplomats. It was fascinating to go behind the scenes as Warrick weaves together a complicated story about the rise of a deadly terrorist group. Most fascinating was reading how seemingly random Zarqawi's rise to power was and how American complicity allowed Zarqawi to slip through their fingers, again and again, with devastating consequences. Recommended.

I need a little humor next. Found some funny one's - http://wowfulgifts.com/category/books/

(Zone 9b)

Hi everyone! I am hoping someone here knows what I need to buy to have books read to me while in bed. I do not know if a Kindle would do this. It would be great if I could rent books to listen too thru the device so I do not have discs or whatever to wait for and then mail back. Something small that I could have next to my head in bed telling me a bedtime story. I guess I am returning to my childhood. Maybe there is no such thing yet.
Thanks

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Do you have a smartphone? Ask your library or visit their website, for downloadable "e audiobooks" I think you can download to a smartphone and listen in bed. Here's general information for the service my library has.
http://www.aacpl.net/research-learn/oneclickdigital-eaudiobooks

I really need to try that myself!

I am saving two paperbacks for a trip in February. Both are in poor condition, rescued from the library discard, so I can read them and toss them. Bean Trees/Kingsolver, and Complications- narrative nonfiction about the medical field, by Atul Gawande.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I'm trying that Oneclick Digital. I am listening to a sample from this
http://www.npr.org/2014/08/12/339833454/in-a-funny-new-novel-a-weary-professor-writes-to-dear-committee-members
Seems promising but I can't read other things on the laptop and actually pay attention to this. I can see I might like something to talk me to sleep though.

But my laptop needs an app to use the service, and I haven't figured it out yet. Just be aware that e- books may take some persistence in getting set up. It says it works on various android and other devices.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

now that I'm paying attention, that book is good!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I'm more than a day late but hanging in there with reading. It's been slow. Wow, Rory, such a great review! Truly struggling through Finkler's Question. Maybe a bit too close to home as a Jewish person. Lots of angst. Why can't we write with less pain?

Northern, NJ(Zone 6b)

I read a few books that were gifts but nothing really struck me as memorable.
I just finished "Carol" by Patricia Highsmith, before that a mystery by a French author, Jeremie Guez, "Eyes Full of Empty".
Both were well written but the mystery was very violent and there are just so many fights I can tolerate in one book.
"Carol" on the other hand was so minutely aware of every little emotion involved in falling in love that it became tedious.
Maybe it was me being overly critical, I can't seem to get interested in a book lately.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I'm working on The Goldfinch for a book club. I got halfway through it and didn't like the way the protagonist was behaving. The book is described as Dickensian, but in Dickens' novels the hero is a likable albeit often na´ve individual. I'll finish it because it's for the book club, but somewhat reluctantly. I reread People of the Book for the first meeting and was glad I did because I enjoyed both the book and the discussion, but I thought some of the violence was gratuitous. I don't do violence...

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I had to try five or six times before that reply would post. The board is buggy again.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Done with The Finkler Question. Melancholy most of the time except when it's downright morose. Still, very well written if you're in a thoughtful, brooding mood.

I started Gone Girl during the sleepless hours. I recall several of you read it. So far it's a smoother, less complicated, style than Finkler. Hopefully I won't slog along with this one.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Done with The Finkler Question. Melancholy most of the time except when it's downright morose. Still, very well written if you're in a thoughtful, brooding mood.

I started Gone Girl during the sleepless hours. I recall several of you read it. So far it's a smoother, less complicated, style than Finkler. Hopefully I won't slog along with this one.

Okay, is this about to post twice?

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Liked the movie for Gone Girl.
I really enjoyed that book, Dear Committee Members. Fabulous vocabulary and dry humor and sarcasm.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Just finished The Goldfinch. Was that discussed here? I remember seeing it somewhere recently. It was very well-written but I felt it went on for far too long...

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Has anyone read Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time?

I have a hard time reading through books these days, since I allow interruptions and I also fall asleep easier while upright holding a book (much to Marianne's annoyance). I took this one up while on vacation - to try to get over the jet lag - and managed to finish it.

I have a lot of science in my genes, so a subject like this beckoned. The history behind the topic is downright startling if you have no background whatsoever in the nautical - which I also don't, being a lifelong landlubber.

Take a look at blurbs about it, and tell me what you think. I noticed that a film or series was made about it too. I'm looking forward to a trip to England...

http://davasobel.com/

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Leslie, several of us read Goldfinch. I agree regarding the length but concluded that the slowest moving portions reflected the suspended existance of the protagonist. Maybe giving the author too much credit.

John, will check it out. If you like science, and have Netflix, check out SlingShot, a documentary about Dean Kamen, the inventor of the Segway and much, much more. In other news, or if you prefer a segway, the man who bought the Segway company died on his Segway today. Try that ten times fast.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Goldfinch was a bit long for me too, but I did stick with it.

Longitude... sounds like a good suggestion for my hubby, and me. I like me some 'narrative nonfiction science"

I picked up The Hobbit last night to try again, since it has been --ugh-- darn near 40 years since I first read it!!!

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Just finished Family Life by Akhil Sharma. It was interesting, sort of unusual. Here's a piece from the New Yorker in which he writes about writing the book
http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/a-novel-like-a-rocket

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Has anyone read Belva Plain, specifically Heartwood? It seems a pleasant style that might be of interest.
I had a call tonight from a woman looking for book club ideas- one of her book clubs is through her temple and likes a Jewish women tie in. I exhausted the top of my head with Suite Francaise, Sarah's Key, All the light we Cannot See, Paris Architect... wished I could access this discussion. I said I would look for more and email her. SO far:

The Goddess of Small Victories (2012) Yannick Grannec
http://www.amazon.com/Goddess-Small-Victories-Yannick-Grannec/dp/1590516362

The House at Tyneford (2011) Natasha Solomons
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=The+House+at+Tyneford+%282011%29

The Gallery of Vanished Husbands Natasha Solomons
http://www.amazon.com/Gallery-Vanished-Husbands-Natasha-Solomons/dp/0142180548/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1454630163&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Gallery+of+Vanished+Husbands

The Forever Street (1984) Frederic Morton (Kindle only)
we do not have on county, maybe can get from another county, but you may have to order online. Look at others by this author
http://www.amazon.com/Forever-Street-Novel-Frederic-Morton-ebook/dp/B000SIS5I8/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1454630294&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Forever+Street+%281984%29

The World of Yesterday, or others by Stefan Zweig (Kindle only?)
http://www.amazon.com/Chess-Story-Review-Books-Classics-ebook/dp/B005SGW6BM/ref=pd_sim_351_3?ie=UTF8&dpID=51EU46QyuML&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR100%2C160_&refRID=1794B3BX91H5ZNTDVRM2


Try this link to a search in Novelist
http://web.a.ebscohost.com/novp/results?sid=a81c4bcd-aeef-4f3f-91b9-4ef0b5439052%40sessionmgr4005&vid=1&hid=4201&bquery=(jewish+AND+women)&bdata=JnR5cGU9MCZzaXRlPW5vdnAtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I read Evergreen decades ago. Not sure about Heartwood. Is the search on for a Jewish author, Jewish female protagonist or both? The Red Tent, while not current, has been popular with book clubs and is newer than Plain's work. Nora Ephron is a Jewish author. Heck, even Nigella Lawson. They could do a cooking/reading combo club. :)

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I think it is not a strict definition, or maybe she was wide open because there were two clubs to think about. She mentioned Red Tent. and The Boston Girl. I'll add your suggestions, can't hurt.

apologies, I think one of the long links has stretched my last post past the edge

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Alice Hoffman covers both items in The Dove Keepers. The Museum of Extraordinary Things is another good one from her. It's been awhile, but I'd like to read more of her work. Highly recommend.

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Here's what I've been reading - until this morning, when I woke up with eyes swollen shut.

Not exactly ironic...

Thumbnail by ViburnumValley
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Ginkos are everday trees? Really? What's up, John? Conjunctivitis or cats?

I'm making headway on Gone Girls. We get to Festival movies early for good seats and I use the time to read.

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Ginkgo is planted pretty regularly around here - maybe not so much by you? - but I think the author uses the term to refer to trees she (and the accompanying photographer) could see every day in their central VA area - and want to watch, study, contemplate, and write about.

Something has smitten me, and I assume it's associated with my winter cold/crud and got tired of just being in my nose and throat. Not cats - bite your tongue.

Thumbnail by ViburnumValley
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

No not so regularly and I'm surprised you are on board with that. The cover struck me as weird. I agonize over my gifted Japanese maples and whether to plant them or burn them.

We were cat people, by default for many years, because I drag any and all living creatures off the street. We are currently catless and that's the plan. If they come up with a cat that has no hair, no bladder and stays low I'll reconsider.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I was surprised to see that a common cheap shopping center near me has a bunch of ginkgos. Planted maybe ten years ago?

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Of any non-native species to be planted, Ginkgo is probably the most benign. I have seen a couple seedlings emerge in a bed of Japanese Pachysandra, but beyond that all they do is grow old and look good in fall.

They are great big zeros as far as ecosystem services contributors (OK, they do absorb some carbon) since NOTHING in North America uses them.

Thank you for the insight by which I can stab you back when you ultimately find fault with some aspect of how I live my life - like Marianne's pork tenderloin in mushroom cream sauce...

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

That response contained some vagueries common to online chat. I would hate to be stabbed with a pork roast, especially one with mushroom cream sauce. Marianne might not be pleased either.

Ginkgos are very unusual in landscape here. I occasionally see wimpy saplings installed here and there, with lots of staking, as front yard specimens. Months ago I noted a historic home-turned-law office with a pair of matching ginkgos flanking the walkway. That's the first time I'd seen mature specimens outside of a botanical garden site. As for the does and don'ts...I defer to your expertise unless it's my space.

I know Gone Girl was a movie and lots of you know the outcome. I keep thinking the obvious answer to this mystery can't be the answer. Don't tell me.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

We really need to clarify postings on either this thread or the other. I'm so confused. Finished Gone Girl. Okay. Probably better as a movie than a book. Entertaining and engaging story but I appreciate exceptional writing as well. Her writing lags. Also, something about novels where the sex of the author is suffused throughout kinda damages the storyline for me. I predicted the outcome way before the end of the story. The male character was never convincingly the mind of a man which is why the movie might better portray the situation. Not that I'm above reading tripe or trite. Might hit up the tripe/trite list for my next read.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I'm just posting here; this is the current thread! Last night I went to a presentation on planting for wildlife, and she was talking about how horrible vinca and English ivy are, and how invasive. We put those in many years ago when we first moved here and I don't know how I'd remove them now, but the vinca has remained confined to the one area of the riverbank where we started it, and the ivy somehow stays politely on our chimney. The lawn guys cut it back every year and then I dispose of the cuttings as though they were plague-infected. So far that hasn't spread at all, either.

I just finished The History of Love for the book club. I thought it was good but it seemed as though it took too long for the threads to tie up and I wasn't sure what was happening at the very end. I'll be interested in hearing the discussion about it.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

If you look at the title this is not the current thread. The link to the current thread was posted on Sept 24. It has a date after this one. GH you posted the link and started the new thread. Lol : )

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Oh no! I just posted to the one that had a new message! Mea culpa.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I hope you don't expect me to keep this straight by the time I finish another book.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Head back to the one that says Winter 2015!

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

This is the only thread I've been on...

Someone should post the link to the newest thread HERE, so no one joins the other lemmings currently marching off the cliff.

OK, here it is: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1406093/

Don't ya'll come back here, now - ya hear?

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

Thanks, VV!

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