So, what are you reading? 2015, Fall & Winter

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

This is a continuation of the thread here -

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1398810/

which I started on June 21st. It was getting a bit long!

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Thanks Gg. I AM a bit shocked to realize how far we are past June 21! That medieval book sounds excellent.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

It's surprisingly easy reading - it reads more like a novel. And if you like medieval books, take a look at Jean Gill's quartet. The first one is Song at Dawn, and she hasn't written the fourth one yet. They're beautifully written and researched.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Hubby Mark is really enjoying a book about building the Panama Canal, on Nook. I think the author is the one who's done other detailed histories such as one on the car industry. David something?

WInd/Pinball is interesting in that 'wonder what literary significance I'm completely missing" sort of way. I struggled with that in AP English. I am so literal and logical.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Semper, I am so sorry that you did not enjoy The Goldfinch, but I, too, really loved The Golem and the Jinni! It was dark and yet light-hearted at the same time, very enjoyable!!

I have recently gotten totally sucked into a series by Shane Parkinson; the first is the "Promises To Keep" series, beginning with "Sentence of Marriage", followed by "Mud and Gold", and then "Settling the Account", "A Second Chance", "Daisy's War", and most recently "After the Roses". That last one was just published on 9/28, and sadly I gobbled it all up in 1 day.. so now I have no idea how long I'll have to wait for the next one. I hate when I do that!!

So meanwhile, I am onto something a bit deeper now..."A Concise Guide to Bible Prophecy:..." by Stan Guthrie. This should keep me happily busy for a while. :) I love re-visiting 1 and 2 Kings, it's so deep and sad and exciting and WOW!!!!!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Since my last post I've read (in order) Swimming Home, by Deborah Levy, A Sense Of Ending, by Julian Barnes, The Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters & The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson.

Swimming Home is a novelette. Both Swimming Home and A Sense Of Ending address themes of suicide and psyche. Thought provoking and raw; they are very different but good reads. I'm especially looking forward to reading more from Julian Barnes.

I thought Fingersmith a more nuanced, well paced and suspenseful novel than The Little Stranger which seemed to plod. Still, Waters writing is enjoyable and her period descriptions place you firmly in the era of the tale.

The Lottery is a ten minute short story that I had forgotten I'd read years ago. Very Twilight Zone.

I've just started Richard Flanagan's, The Narrow Road To The Deep North. The subject of POW's and the Burma railroad is new to me. He is Tasmanian so his references and language are going to be a challenge but the story is outstanding from the outset. It's a fiction based on the true story of his father's internment.

This message was edited Oct 14, 2015 7:39 AM

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

The Lottery is a strange story. It really makes you think.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

re my previous
Path Between the Seas by David McCullough

if you plan to go see the movie Everest which is in theaters now, please speed read the book Into Thin Air first. It's a good outdoor adventure movie but the book of course gives much more dimension to the story and people

edited for clarity

This message was edited Oct 2, 2015 6:25 PM

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

lol. I didn't initially get it Sally. Plan to see Everest? No thanks; a little old for that. :) I'm not clear on your opinion of Goldfinch from some of the comments. Yes? No? Maybe? SO thought his editor should have taken big scissors to the book. I thought the effluence was a stylistic device and didn't mind wading amidst the sea of words.

Shirley Jackson was a strange and creative writer, Lisa. Her husband and family were/are part of an intellectual arts community that seems, for the most part, to have gone the way of the dinosaur. Those days of salon intellectuals.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I was really engrossed in Goldlfinch through three fourths of it. I started to think it would never end when he was back in New York working and successful but addicted. I really liked the style and story, but it was a bit long. Liked the ending.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

I found the story to be very dark and riveting, it just kept me sucked in like a whirlpool; while it was a struggle to stick with it at times, it was equally a struggle to break free, and in the end I just had to give in and go with it to the very end. I'm glad I did. Gosh, I found 'War and Peace' to be a lighter read than this one! ;)

We don't go to the theater very often, mostly because there isn't a decent one nearer to us than an hour's drive away, so I doubt we'll be going to see Everest, but I may have to check into that book. Laurel... "too old"? You!?!? Poppycock!! =)

Northern, NJ(Zone 6b)

I just finished "My Year of Meats" by Ruth Ozeki.
I had already read and enjoyed a later book by this author, "A Tale for the Time Being" and loved the visual images her words brought forth.
It took me awhile to start the earlier "Meats" book as I am a modified vegetarian ( I eat fish ) and was apprehensive about the subject.
She is a very good writer but includes some very tough topics so I won't recommend her books for everyone.
Ozeki is a Asian American buddhist monk and film maker.
Both books explore Japanese and American culture in unique ways.
Not always the best sides of people but unblinking and all too human and somehow I was able to face the truth in her writing.
She is also funny at points.
Some of the characters and situations are loathsome so be prepared.

This message was edited Oct 5, 2015 9:15 AM

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

semp, that has me intrigued!

The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande. (surgeon)
Third of his books I have read. This one describes a number of situations and experiences he has had, leading up to his proposal that medicine needs more checklists and cross communication, systematic procedures to make sure everything gets done right. It's a bit scary hearing how many mistakes are apparently being made everyday and worldwide, simply forgetting all the known best practices. Of course, understaffing has something (a lot) to do with this. It is encouraging to see how much money and suffering can be saved over the current sometimes sloppy procedures.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

rats, my library does not have that Ozeki book

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Sally, can you have it sent in to you from another branch? Or perhaps borrow it on your reading device?

Semp, wasn't it very difficult reading a book like that about meats? Gosh, I couldn't imagine being a pescatarian and reading something like that.. I don't think I'd have the backbone to do it. .. errr... no pun intended. :(

Still enjoying Stan Guthrie here.

Northern, NJ(Zone 6b)

Sally and speedie, it helped that the beginning of the book "My Year of Meats" was about a female Asian American filmmaker hired by a Japanese firm, who in turn were hired by an American Beef Export syndicate, BEEF EX, to create weekly films called "My American Wife" to sell beef to Japanese wives.
Family life and recipes included.
It was so absurd it was intriguing.
And the recipes!. There was one that was a fudge and beef dessert.

The real hardcore slaughterhouse images came much later.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I can get it from another county. Our copies must have gotten worn out or lost.

Slaughterhouse-- eek

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

OK, now that really does sound intriguing; fudge and beef dessert!? NOT something I'd try, but I'd love to read about how someone came up with that idea. Talk about selling!

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Sometimes I love my job. Like today- going through books donated to us. Lots and lots of mass market paperback romances, lots of them old and yellowing or stained...and then Fingersmith! Thanks for you guys helping me know what to look for!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Crud. I just posted a book post on Netflix Favs.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I hate when I do that

"Great find, Sally. Are you going to read it right away?"

Yes, I started last night and find it engaging from the get-go.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Sally,I read the Poisioner's Handbook. I loved it.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Finished Richard Flanagan's, The Narrow Road To The Deep North, winner of the 2014 Man Booker prize. Having read a number of deep and heavy novels this year, this one tops the list.with the tragic story of the Japanese capture, and brutal enslavement, of mostly Australian soldiers to build a railroad through the jungles of Burma to Siam (now Thailand) during WW II. The history is fascinating...approximately 20,000 Australian troops along with Dutch and American were Japanese POWs used for slave labour and medical experimentation. This is a survival (or not) story, based on the author's father's experience, written in part as it unfolds and in part as a memoir. It's difficult to follow initially because the chapters are short and flip between the unfolding war events and a love affair that occured years before. Further on the personal stories of peripheral characters are laced into separate chapters with horrifically graphic detail of human suffering. Fascinating, depressing and complex true events written with great skill.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Started Gumbeaux (as in gumbo) by Kimberly Vargas. Looking for a floater after the Flanagan novel. It was a BookBub freebie I downloaded several weeks ago.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Halfway through FIngersmith. OH. MY. GOSH. I can't imagine where else it can go, with this as halfway....

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I am way too slowly suffering through Gumbeaux. It's got five star sedative quality. Can't read the end like some and can't quit it like others. Apparently chick lit is not the genre for me. The numerous rave reviews must have been written by a lot of cloistered adolescents. Like really. I originally thought the juvi lingo was a device but it's just lame literature.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I read Gumbeaux a while ago and had to go to Amazon just now to remind myself of what it was about. Not particularly stirring fiction.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I listened to the beginning of Hunger Games, and, like, I couldn't get interested in it, but, like, I could see the appeal to teens.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Haha.And what's with the latest speaking style where every declaritive sentence comes out sounding like a question? A declaritive sentence is the opposite of a question? Yes? No? Maybe? That and, "me and ..." send me up the wall. Like really?

Phew, Leslie, glad you had the same opinion. It's making question my chckness.

Hillsborough, NC(Zone 7b)

"The Three Miss Margarets" on one iPad

And "Into the Wild" on another.

Just started both.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I am fascinated with Into the Wild, have read twice and audio-booked once.

One more thing? Young adults? Like, they sometimes talk so fast? Sheesh.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

At least they are reading.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Our oldest son is an extreme survivalist. I've come to think of it as a very on the edge sport and don't approve. He goes out in any weather, on forestry access roads, not main hiking trails. He intentionally avoids main trails because they are, in his opinion, spoiled. He's not as extreme as he used to be but still mostly hikes off trail with minimal water and food. He grew up hiking and camping with us which was comprised of tenting, open fire cooking and grocery shopping from a cooler. He evolved into a fly weight tent, a Svea stove and dried food. But as he hiked the Appalachian Trail, he sent home the tent and stove as well as his two sets of uundergarments and wore a hiker skirt. That's something akin to a kilt. So now, twenty years later,, he turns off his phone and disappears into the woods. Sometimes for days and sometimes for weeks.

There was a Netflix documentary narrative about a German guy who went off to the woods to die. Like McCandless, he lived a really long time but it was his intention to document his death. It gave me nightmares.

Hillsborough, NC(Zone 7b)

Just started the book so just learning about what the author thinks made Chris McCandless tick.
It is a worry Maypop but your son has been at it a long time and so his skills and reasoning must get better and better. Your worry should get less and less. I know it doesn't however. My brother just passed two weeks ago....(70's) your description of your son's activities reminds me of my brother, He would disappear in all these back waterways ( canals?? ) in the everglades. Minimal supplies. I heard stories about his getting stuck on sand bars and jumping into the water with snakes and gators. We would not know where he was for weeks. This was 30 years or more ago...no cell phones. In civilization, he was a mechanical genius. Bendix Corp. Local docs and dentists would ask him to guide them - I think a place called thousand islands. He would oblige sometimes but complained bitterly about all the necessities they carried -- like food! Before we moved to Fla., he would disappear in upstate NY. I heard family tales about his wanderings from a very early age. They would have the smalltown out looking. He heard a different drummer.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I can't imagine the worry, for either of you. But what can you do?
I don't recall the author Krakauer taking much of a position on the 'why' of it. I think Chris just cut it too close, did not fully realize what he was getting in to, and then had bad luck too.
Did any of you read Cheryl Strayed's book Wild? What did you think?

Hillsborough, NC(Zone 7b)

No, is it worth the read?

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Since I love solo hiking stories, I enjoyed it. Others thought it self serving. A lot of reflecting about her relationship with the mother, I liked that aspect.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I've not read Wild and the Netflix documentary I'm thinking of is The Sound Of Insects. It's chilling. When I Googled key words to jar my memory on the title a bunch of into the woods death by starvation results came up. All male. My boy showed up at the back door this afternoon. Big sigh of relief from me and just in time to put in a birthday dinner request which will happen on the 28th.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Hallalujah! I don't think I could bear to look further into those sorts of stories.

On the final pages of Fingersmith. WHEW!!! I'll be let down after, you kind of hate for god stories to end.

Kansas City (Joyce), MO(Zone 5a)

Hi everyone, now that winter is fast approaching I will get to read more. Love hate relationship, if it is a good book I don't want to do anything else...lol

I have read 'IntoThin Air' a long time ago and loved it. Wish I would of made it to the movies to see it but didn't.
I don't enjoy the classic female novel at all, Wish I did enjoy my baby sister has a 1,000 of them..lol

I did read Gone Girl before probably a year or so before becoming a movie...lol and enjoyed it.

Does anyone read on a Kindle? Sometimes they give you a free book from a new author sometimes their first book which is kind of fun I think. One that I read which I liked was 'The Dead Key' by D. M. Pulley. There are things that let you know it is a first novel but overall I thought it was quite good. It jumps back and forth between 40 years.

I liked Bobby Adair and his books 'Ebola K: A Terrorism Thriller' book 1 and book 2 waiting on book 3. Course book 2 was a continuation of book 1 but you all probably knew that.

I am gonna look up Fingersmith.

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