So What Are You Reading? 2016, Spring and Summer -

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

New thread. We are coming from here -
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1406093/

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

thanks!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Ditto thanks.

Started Homer And Langley last night and fell right into it.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Homer and Langley is at my branch , will get it today, yay.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

So far, told through the "eyes" of Homer, the younger brother. Not a spoiler but if "ironic" is an overused adjective it's not here. He's blind. Getting more and more interesting. Fast and easy read. Doctorow challenges my vocabulary here and there. I like to have to look up words.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Here's Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collyer_brothers

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Interesting how Doctorow switched their birth order. There are other switches too. Have you started yet? Working still on getting the garden planted but afternoon storms are giving me extra reading time. I'm more than halfway through.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

Haven't started, left it at work, but sounds like I'll race through when I get it. I read about the brothers last night, fascinating. My aunt showed some tendencies, turns out she could have been much worse!

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't this book a novel ie Historical Fiction? Not that, that matters just wondering.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Yes. He writes historical fiction.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I'm not sure I'd read this if I didn't know the back story, but it is interesting. I'm wondering how much is true (the tea parties..) It's utterly amazing how large their house must have been, the amount of things in it. 12 pianos???

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I like his writing but am disappointed that he plays with the known history. It's one thing to insert thoughts or feelings into characters when such is unknown and another to change around a known story. Enjoying the book but now it's all less credible.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Done. Not his best but I enjoyed the story. After reading a few pages of Erik Larson's, Devil In The White City, I'm hooked. Totally true story and I'm eager to dive in.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I'm done too. Was interesting, from the viewpoint of the blind brother, who I thought of as the passive person from reading the history, but this gave him an active role and depth. Sad.
Now on to Gray Mountain, Grisham, for book club, slightly annoying and will probably skim some. Not awful, but somewhat predictable.

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Oh oh oh! I know that one - Devil in the White City.

Gruesome serial killer revelations set amongst the time of Olmsted's site planning and design of the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago - which coincides with his penultimate park planning and design work in Louisville.

I'm an unabashed history buff...

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

John, how about Rising Tide and/or The Great Influenza, both by John M. Barry? I enjoyed them both, though they may be 'history lite' for a true buff.

Northern, NJ(Zone 6b)

greenhouse gal, I did get Longbourn on your recommendation and I just finished it.

You were right it was certainly better then most of the books that use Jane Austin as a base.
I did enjoy it and found the structure, where everything is seen through the servants eyes but hints of the original story are there, especially using lines from the original.
It was fun to find the lines and remember the original.
But this is a darker tale in so many aspects.
The war scenes were some of the bleakest I have read.
Mrs Hill's full story in this telling is very interesting as is the rewrite of the father.

The other script I really liked using Pride and Prejudice as a base was a movie called "Lost in Austin".
In some ways there is a similarity, by skewing the story to deal with some issues that are more common now, not present in the original novels. Although "Lost in Austin" is more a romantic comedy.
Then there is the more contemporary, more realistic to the actual source of fortunes through the slave trade, retelling of Mansfield Park in movie form where Fanny Price is altered to be an independent young women instead of the annoying goody 2 shoes.
Mansfield Park has some interesting parts but it is hard to like Fanny as she is written.
But I also found the rewrite unacceptable. .


This message was edited Jun 9, 2016 4:28 AM

This message was edited Jun 9, 2016 7:34 AM

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I'm glad you enjoyed it. I've been reading Charlotte Macleod's Sara Kelling mysteries and liking them; the characters are interesting and intelligent, and the plots are just complex enough.

I also just finished The Ashford Affair by Lauren Willig, which I thought was well-written and which held my attention - From the Amazon description: "As a lawyer in a large Manhattan firm, just shy of making partner, Clementine Evans has finally achieved almost everything she's been working towardsóbut now she's not sure it's enough. Her long hours have led to a broken engagement and, suddenly single at thirty-four, she feels her messy life crumbling around her. But when the family gathers for her grandmother Addie's ninety-ninth birthday, a relative lets slip hints about a long-buried family secret, leading Clemmie on a journey into the past that could change everything. . . .

Growing up at Ashford Park in the early twentieth century, Addie has never quite belonged. When her parents passed away, she was taken into the grand English house by her aristocratic aunt and uncle, and raised side-by-side with her beautiful and outgoing cousin, Bea. Though they are as different as night and day, Addie and Bea are closer than sisters, through relationships and challenges, and a war that changes the face of Europe irrevocably. But what happens when something finally comes along that can't be shared? When the love of sisterhood is tested by a bond that's even stronger?"

Northern, NJ(Zone 6b)

I read the Charlotte Macleod Sara Kelling series years ago and know I liked them but can't recall a single one. Maybe I should reread some. It usually takes a few chapters before I recall the story.

I do like mystery series but not real crime or serial killer books.

My favorite mystery writer is Louise Penny and her Canadian series with Chief Inspector Armand Gamache.

"Trick of the Light" is my favorite, it includes artists and public and private perceptions of art and artists and the whole art scene.

"Still Life" her first book also has art as a main part of the story also but in a rather unique way.
She is due to have a new book out this August and I am waiting not so patiently.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I've read some of Louise Penny's books, but there is so much darkness in the atmosphere and some of her characters' souls that I find them unappealing. I prefer cozy mysteries! But I'll see if I have "Trick of the Light." I might try reading that.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

John, I thought you might know that book. Aside from the history, the mystery and Olmsted, I'm an architecture nut. So Burnham and Root (a native Georgia son), who were in charge of the whole shebang, built Atlanta's first skyscraper, the Equitable. We went with friends at 5 a.m. to watch it blown up in '71. We did that alot back then. Cheap entertainment for poor young students.

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Did you read "The Day the Empire State Went Visiting" as a youngster?

I think that bred my interest in buildings, science, engineering - and travel. Great inspirational kids book...

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I didn't but it sounds interesting. Not much information on line. What age would you say this is aimed at?

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

I would venture that 6 - 8 years old is probably appropriate. Others may be able to more accurately evaluate this.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I'll look for it at the library. I'm just about the right age.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

:^) Laurel!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I've started applying the dog year approach to my age. Works for me. That and the fact that I love to play in the dirt makes such reading age appropriate. Maybe Lil'E would like to share.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I bet he would. Isn't he into forts or was that farts. : )

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I forgot about that book, Lisa. Heard about it but never saw it. Thanks for reminding me. Going to ask to see it. He's recently graduated from diapers to "boxing" shorts. It was during the transition that he became a body function officianado. A book for that other library.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Finished Devil In The White City. Highly recommend. The book is an in depth history of the conception and execution of the 1893 Chicago Worlds Fair. In tandem is the parallel story of the first identified seriel killer, H.H. Holmes, a physician, who killed dozens for sure, perhaps hundreds, during the same period and under the nose of Chicago law enforcement. Though the story of a serial killer is well woven, the book concentrates on the political and economic challenges of the time and event and the masterminds who created it such as noted architect Daniel Burnham and Frederick Law Olmsted. Good read especially if you like history and architecture. Erik Larson's books are heavily researched and his epilogue footnotes are lengthy.

I've started T.C.Boyle's, Budding Prospects, about a guy who seeks a financial windfall by becoming a pot farmer. It's fiction and one of his older books.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)


edited duplicate


This message was edited Jul 3, 2016 5:33 PM

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

DWC sure sounds good, I don't know why I picked it up once and then dropped it.
The next book sounds curiously current.

Next for my book club- What She Left Behind.
http://www.litlovers.com/reading-guides/13-fiction/9663-what-she-left-behind-wiseman

Curiously, one of the book club attendees did have a relative who was committed to an asylum for the 'problem' of being just a bit of a wild child. It seems that those with means did sometimes get rid of embarrassing kids (girls?) that way

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

The Kennedys had a daughter who was mildly developmentally delayed and promiscuous. They fixed her up with a lobotomy and institionalized her. Husbands were notorious for threats or actions with errant wives. Those certainly were the days.

Northern, NJ(Zone 6b)

I'm reading Ken Follett"s The Pillars of the Earth.
It is a big book, over 900 pages and I am a little less then half way through.
Since it is a story of the Middle ages in England, I was wary, I had read and not liked other novels from this period. But it was presented to me as the story of architecture, the building of a Cathedral, so I thought it would be about the structure, the design, the space.
This is more about the people behind the building and what a powerful structure means and how it can be used to further a career.
There is a lot of vivid violence and corruption and high stakes political intrigue, the worst of human nature vividly drawn out.
Not exactly the kind of book I enjoy and I keep putting it down or quickly scanning, instead of reading, the really cruel sections, but I am continuing to read.


This message was edited Jul 3, 2016 4:59 AM

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I think there was a mini series on that book. It was gory.

I also have WIlde Lake by Laura Lippman. A must-know author if you grew up near Baltimore like I did. I think I'll start it first, and hope that I can also cram in the book club selection before our meeting.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Oh, the pitfalls of clubbing. :>) I'm still on Budding Prospects. Not sure where it's going but it's interesting.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I didn't make this up. It comes complete with international sound effects. Those are the buttons on the right. Replete with anecdotal, scientific and socialogical implications. A must read for those who ponder the inner universe.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

What a hoot! I almost cannot beleive they complete it with sound effects.
But for accompaniment; I came across this somehow recently.. borrowed it from another MD library
https://www.amazon.com/Story-Little-Mole-Search-Whodunit/dp/081094457X

Great little boy humor, eh?

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Can you believe it was banned in the U.S.? Lil'E spent his weekend collecting dead bugs under the furniture. Two marmorated stink bugs, one roach and a fly. We gave him sheets of toilet paper to pick them up and told him to flush them. Then, very newly toilet trained, he gleefully had to poop on them. Boy children are weird.

Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

How did America get so... squeamish? (Puritanical? I can't find the word I want)
https://www.amazon.com/Everyone-Turtleback-School-Library-Binding/dp/0613685725

That's the most innovative toilet training reinforcement I've ever heard, hahahaha.

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or sign up to post.
BACK TO TOP