Container rock gardening in Midwest climate

Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

This is a continuation of a thread documenting successes and failures trying to grow a variety of alpines in the humid (definitely non-alpine) conditions of the Midwest.
All the following plants have survived a full year in well-draining large containers left outdoors overwinter. Most are still fledgling, so I can't claim they're thriving.
#1 Saxifraga Winifred Bevington
#2 Saxifraga Southside Seedling
#3 Gypsophila repens
#4 Erodium petraeum ssp crispum

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Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

testing, ...

Site won't let me add another set of pictures. I can reply with text, but as soon as I add the pictures, I'm in an endless loop of 'previewing' my post.

Maybe I'll let it rest and try again tomorrow...

This message was edited Jun 3, 2016 5:58 AM

Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

Again can't post. I'll try one at a time, see if it works.
#5 Limonium minutum. Blooms are so tiny, my camera's macro setting isn't adequate. I like this plant.
#6. Armeria maritima Victor Reiter. I've never had armeria survive here, but in this quick draining gritty soil, it has done fine.
#7 Arenaria tetraquetra. Interesting foliage. It was budding up beautifully, but all the buds turned yellow and never opened. So I'm not sure if it will bloom better with maturity or not.
#8 Alyssum ovirense. Again, tiny, tiny yellow flowers which challenge my camera's macro capabilities. The foliage is a beautiful silver which provides a great foil for the bright yellow (tiny) flowers.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

Well, looks like you can post pictures singly.
That was Limonium minutum above.
This is Armeria maritima Victor Reiter. I've never had an Armeria survive before, much less flower.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

Now I'm on a roll, I'll see if I can post 2 pics at the same time.
First if the Arenaria tetraquetra.
Second is Alyssum ovirense.

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Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

A really beautiful androsace opening up now - A. lanuginosa.
The flowers are tiny - this is a super close up.
But check out the multicolored centers.

Limonium minutum has been blooming for past 2 wks,
flowers gradually getting bigger.

Thumbnail by Weerobin Thumbnail by Weerobin
Camano Island, WA(Zone 8a)

That's awsome...you have GOT to be kidding! Androsace lanuginosa has different colored flower centers!!!! How is that even possible? Does a blossom start out at one color and then age to another color, or does each blossom stay its own separate color?

Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

Don't know how it works yet - just surprised by the discovery myself. It's just starting to bloom, but it's such a small plant, only will have a few blooms this year. I'll be interested to see if the other blooms are also multicolored. Also don't know if the colors evolve as the bloom fades - I guess I'll find out. And the blooms are tiny - those pictured are at the highest magnification my camera can muster.

Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

Here's another shot with a couple more blooms open.
Again, a nice mixture of colors.
Unfortunately, picture isn't great ...
I leave for work before sun is up, get home at dusk. Frustrating.
Hopefully the blooms will wait for better daytime photo ops on weekend!

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Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Quote from momlady :
Androsace lanuginosa has different colored flower centers!!!! How is that even possible? Does a blossom start out at one color and then age to another color, or does each blossom stay its own separate color?


This seems to be a relatively common thing among white-flowered Androsace species, and a very neat one. The "conventional wisdom" (that is, what you might read - not sure if it's true - so many myths and fallacies in gardening) is that the flower center (or sometimes the whole flower) changes colour with pollination, usually from yellow to pink. Or maybe it's just as the flower ages, who knows?

Here's Androsace limprichtii showing this change. The second photo is the same plant 8 days later.

Thumbnail by altagardener Thumbnail by altagardener
Saint Louis, MO(Zone 6a)

Very interesting, Alta - thanks.
After a nice spring, we're suddenly in our classic sultry humid summer - temp was 98 yesterday w/ humidity to match. Supposed to be same thru weekend. It's our first real heat of the season, which often spells the end of flowering for many of my plants. Bummer. Now we'll soon be separating the stalwarts from the weak - some will undoubtedly not be able to stand our summer...

Camano Island, WA(Zone 8a)

That Androsace is awesome. I'll have to try some.Thanks, alta and wee, for sharing your pictures and expertise.

We are in the doldrums of Junuary, a Western Washington phenomenon where the weather turns cools and it is either cloudy or rains and drizzles for most of the month. (I complain but it has been perfect for our newly seeded lawn.)

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