Planted in Ground and Growth has Stopped

Trumbull, CT(Zone 7a)

I'm fairly new to growing tomatoes and last summer was a fairly bad season for me.
Bought 2 Bonnie Super Sweet 100 plants this year and they were growing about an inch a week in their original pots. Planted them in our raised garden and they seem to have stopped growing on top. Did the transplant disturb them, are they growing roots? Is this normal?
I also planted a much larger Husky plant that was also growing fast in the pot, same thing not much top growth for the last 2 weeks in the ground. This Husky plant has about 10 green tomatoes on it and many flowers. It is doing well just not much new growth.

Snellville, GA(Zone 7b)

Pete, same thing happened to me and I have been growing them for 40 years. I suspect the usual weather or a growers disease. Mine finally succumbed. Replanted and their doing fine. Ideally suspect some disease because I usually have volunteers popping up but none this year either.

Trumbull, CT(Zone 7a)

Thanks, good to know I'm not the only one.
I think I might have gotten some weed killer for the grass into the soil a month or so before planting. I'm going to cover the garden soil next year before I put down the weed and feed.
Thanks!

Trumbull, CT(Zone 7a)

One of these plants died last season and overall it was very bad hardly any production.
The last 3 years for my tomatoes have been very bad, going to give it one more try.
Is it the lack of rain and weather most likely?
I have irrigation, but not sure if I ran it enough and we had a watering ban.
I think I'm going to plant 2 this season in e-buckets but leave them in the garden on
irrigation to make most efficient use of the water.
Not much activity on here, maybe it will pick up ?

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

You might try the veggie garden forum. It has info about everything veggie. Lol

Have you ever had your soil tested?

Trumbull, CT(Zone 7a)

Quote from 1lisac :
You might try the veggie garden forum. It has info about everything veggie. Lol

Have you ever had your soil tested?


No the garden has been a real mess with weeds for many years when we didn't use it. Yes I should get a test or just add a yard or two of new top soil.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

Tomatoes have a large root system. So if you have deep enough soil, they should do fine. If you have planted them in a raised bed on top of heavily compacted soil, they may not have enough loose soil to sustain root growth. I amend every year, at least around the planting soil with compost. Bags of composted cow manure (sold as Black Kow in Lowe's & Home Depot or Wal Mart) can be your friend). And of course you can add your own compost through the fall and winter (dead leaves, grass clippings, etc) and work it into the soil. And like someone mentioned, new top soil for now.

This time of year, it may not be warm enough in CT to bring on a large amount of new growth yet. I just put mine in the ground this week. Our plant date is technically Apr 15 but we have very warm weather already this week.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Transplanted plants generally stall above soil, when transplanted, while adjusting to their new situation and expanding their root systems. This is not necessarily "transplant shock".

Weeds are favorable to vegetable growth. They're a good thing when dug under and added in. That's why fields are layed fallow. You should get a soil test. Random dumps of top soil are not a fix all for not knowing what is going on.

Are you set on vegetables or generic landscape gardening? Two very different pursuits.

Trumbull, CT(Zone 7a)

Quote from OutsidePlaying :
Tomatoes have a large root system. So if you have deep enough soil, they should do fine. If you have planted them in a raised bed on top of heavily compacted soil, they may not have enough loose soil to sustain root growth. I amend every year, at least around the planting soil with compost. Bags of composted cow manure (sold as Black Kow in Lowe's & Home Depot or Wal Mart) can be your friend). And of course you can add your own compost through the fall and winter (dead leaves, grass clippings, etc) and work it into the soil. And like someone mentioned, new top soil for now.


My original post was from last summer, and I was very late to plant, I'm going to buy my plants soon and keep them in their pots so I can bring them in the house if
we have freezing temps at night, then plant in early May. I'll get some of that Black
Kow.
It is a raised garden and is pretty compacted, not sure if I have the energy to
turn it over, I'll give it a try. I'm really not sure what to add to the soil if anything
besides the Black Kow. Can I add the Black Kow now?
I only grow cherry tomatoes.

Thanks everyone for the tips.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

Yes, you can add the Black Kow now. If you are only growing cherry tomatoes they should do fine in pots for a while until safe to put them in the ground. Do you keep them mulched? That will also help. We use wheat straw but anything (other than acidic pine straw) will do fine. I lay cardboard or newspaper around on the ground and put the mulch on top. Keeps the weeds out and it decomposes and adds more to your soil for next year. With a small raised bed, it shouldn't be too hard to do. The Black Kow will also help.

Trumbull, CT(Zone 7a)

Quote from OutsidePlaying :
Yes, you can add the Black Kow now. If you are only growing cherry tomatoes they should do fine in pots for a while until safe to put them in the ground. Do you keep them mulched? That will also help. We use wheat straw but anything (other than acidic pine straw) will do fine. I lay cardboard or newspaper around on the ground and put the mulch on top. Keeps the weeds out and it decomposes and adds more to your soil for next year. With a small raised bed, it shouldn't be too hard to do. The Black Kow will also help.


I am a very lazy gardener and I have used newspaper before but I didn't know that
it would be safe for tomatoes so never have and always get a lot of weeds. I will
certainly do it this time. I also have a good amount of old grass clippings so I
might just cover the whole garden and then put the grass clippings on top. The
garden is about 15' square so not very large. But I only use the corner that gets
the most sun. Should I leave a foot round right at the tomato plant stalk without
newspaper or what is a safe diameter? I usually use pine wood chips for about a
foot diameter right at the plants.

I also had some animal, probably a deer or racoon that likes to dig up the tomato
plants. I also notice that there are not many leaves on my 6 new Azalia plants
same thing on the 7 new rose plants. There is definitely a deer that hangs around
and likes our yards. The neighbor has seen it eating our Hostas right down to the
ground when it gets hot and dry out.

This message was edited Apr 21, 2017 11:48 AM

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

I put my mulch out around 6-8" at least from the stem of the tomato.

Yes, the deer will eat anything green. Hosta is a favorite and I have had the deer nibble on any tomato growth that is outside the fence around our garden. They will nibble azaleas too.

We also have raccoons and possum that climb the fence and nibble on the ripe ones so we set traps when the ripening starts and relocate the animals. The digging is probably a raccoon or possum. I put cages around mine which deters the digging a bit but we now have armadillos trying to dig under the fence. Neverending problems of a gardener.

Snellville, GA(Zone 7b)

How you doing by now Pete? I hope you havent given up yet. After all we learn from mistakes. keep trying different approaches. im in Atlanta area and soon as the soil warms I throw some fertilizer down and then cover with wheat straw. At the end of the season it decomposes into the soil attracting earth worms which is a great way to improve your soil. Try 'Mule Team' tomato it never fails me even in this hot humid red clay based soil and temperature.

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