SOLVED: Bee County, Texas, Sep. 2016

Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Found these in Bee County, Texas earlier this month, surrounded by brazilwood, Texas hogplum, and lime pricklyash. You'd think they'd be easy to ID, given how distinctive they are, but I'm honestly stumped. Any ideas? Thanks y'all

Brandon

Thumbnail by goofballTex Thumbnail by goofballTex
Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Anyone?

Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Anyone at least know what genus it is? Or family maybe?

Camano Island, WA(Zone 8a)

I keep looking but don't have a clue, sorry. I wondered about Solanaceae but didn't really see a good candidate (I'm sure not an expert). Do you have any more pictures you could post? How tall was it? Sun or shade? Acid or alkaline soil? Did it look "native" or planted or invasive? Was it flowering in September? Are those leaves opposite?

Magnolia, TX(Zone 8b)

Aroma? OK, I almost see a wild petunia, ruellia- NOT mexican petunia. Tx has natives. The throat is a bit deep, I need to look some more, not enough petals. Sigh.



This message was edited Sep 30, 2016 5:47 PM

Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

It doesn't seem to resemble any families I'm familiar with, at least not perfectly. But no, these are the only pictures I have. The flowers were about 5ft off the ground, though I didn't get a good look at the whole plant. It was found in a semi-maintained brushland area, at the outer edge of the woods, so sunlight would have been plentiful in the afternoon while fully shaded in the morning. The soil itself would be slightly alkaline, as is typical of inland South Texas.

The plant itself was growing in a native environment, with brazilwood, Texas hogplum, lime pricklyash, desert yaupon, live oak, and ball moss. Thing is, last time I was there I didn't see this particular plant, though that could have just been because it was the middle of winter. It does look deciduous, unlike most of the other plants listed above. It is flowering in September, and I'm pretty sure those leaves are alternate, though I've been wrong about the whole opposite/alternate dichotomy before.

It does somewhat resemble ruellia, but not perfectly. I appreciate y'all's efforts though.

Brandon

Camano Island, WA(Zone 8a)

More clues! Yippee! I will ponder this new info.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

It does resemble a wild petunia but not exactly, I really don't know. Very pretty.

Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Hey y'all, Sean Watson at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center identified it for me! It's Cordia podocephala, Texas manjack. I knew there was a reason I kept looking at the Mexican olive page, lol

Thanks y'all,
Brandon

Raleigh, NC(Zone 7b)

Great that you were able to ID it. Local experts are the best! I didn't have a clue about what it might be and I lived in and travelled in central Texas for several years. Seems like this is a rather uncommon plant with limited distribution. According to PLANTS (see attached map) it doesn't occur in Plano/Collin Co. but their data is sometimes incomplete or maybe your pic is from another area. In any case, consider adding to the PF entry for this plant as it has no info. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/133056

Thumbnail by TomH3787
Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

This was in Bee County, just a bit northwest of Corpus Christi in South Texas, consistent with its USDA PLANTS page. Definitely nowhere near Plano, haha. But yeah, LBJ's plant people are the best when it comes to obscure Texas plants!

Brandon

Camano Island, WA(Zone 8a)

It's awesome to get this ID'd! I was going to suggest a local county extension agent, but forgot. :-( Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center sounds like a great place. I'll have to go there if I am ever in Texas again.

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