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SOLVED: Is it a coconut or not ?

Miami, FL(Zone 11)

Hi to everyone and happy New Year
This plant looks to me like a coconut , but I was told that, the coconut does not blooms so small
Thank you , for whatever you can help me with , in reference to identifying this plant
Best wishes

Thumbnail by MiamiHeatwave Thumbnail by MiamiHeatwave
Contra Costa County, CA(Zone 9b)

Coconut is a palm, so will look like a palm when it sprouts. It will grow for a while before blooming, becoming a typical palm tree. Look at some pictures of sprouting coconuts and other palms, and compare to your plant.

Add more pics: What is at the top of the vertical stem?

What is the texture of the bulb-like thing? Is it a coconut? or is it a fleshy thing, more like a bulb?

Miami, FL(Zone 11)

Hi Diana_K

Thanks for the feedback

Texture is of a coconut, not fleshy at all

When I found it, it had typical palm leaves that withered and it grew a stem upright, which it appears like some, kind of bloom, but it has not developed yet, when it does I will take a pic of it and post it

Where I found it, there was a palm tree, but it was over two years ago, before it was cut down and this seedling is quite small

It goes without a saying that I know very little about palm trees, even though I am surrounded by them

I will close this thread as ID, but as I said before; I will keep an eye on that stem

I checked for palm tree's seedlings, but they were way bigger than this, nevertheless you were on target with the helpful instructions, as always

Best regards and happy 2017

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

It is not a coconut palm. I am a Miami native. Coconut palm seedlings sprout out of a thick, fibrous husk that contains a nut with a hard brown shell. The shell is lined with meat and filled with coconut milk. The husk, after lots of rain or watering, is the initial growing medium for the sprout and must be present since they are generally sprouting above the soil surface. Coconuts are much larger. The nut, in its husk, lays on its side in situ. The growth of your plant looks more similar to the growths that sprout from the bases of bamboo-type palms. From the dead growth present I doubt that is a seed.

Miami, FL(Zone 11)

Quote from MaypopLaurel :
It is not a coconut palm. I am a Miami native. Coconut palm seedlings sprout out of a thick, fibrous husk that contains a nut with a hard brown shell. The shell is lined with meat and filled with coconut milk. The husk, after lots of rain or watering, is the initial growing medium for the sprout and must be present since they are generally sprouting above the soil surface. Coconuts are much larger. The nut, in its husk, lays on its side in situ. The growth of your plant looks more similar to the growths that sprout from the bases of bamboo-type palms. From the dead growth present I doubt that is a seed.


Hello :)
You are right, today I noticed in the stem some small and beautiful flowers w/o fragrance, I don't believe it to be a terrestrial "monk" orchid, due to the seed

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oeceoclades

Which I brought one to be ID at the forum, the seed is totally different and it looks like a coconut seedling and to make things a bit confusing, it was found by the stump of a palm tree that was , cut down, about two years ago

I am waiting for a new camera I ordered and the old one is out commission :(

Beautiful, BC(Zone 8b)

Looks like an Orchid to me.

Contra Costa County, CA(Zone 9b)

Looking forward to the better pictures and new growth.

Miami, FL(Zone 11)

Hello
growing & Diana_K
Hopefully these pics will help :))
Thanks
edit
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1433080/#post_10272650
In this previous thread, I learned about this terrestrial orchid , but the one I am bringing now to the forum, does not look like the seed from the monk


This message was edited Jan 28, 2017 9:42 PM

Thumbnail by MiamiHeatwave Thumbnail by MiamiHeatwave Thumbnail by MiamiHeatwave
Beautiful, BC(Zone 8b)

Encyclia tampensis

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

It does appear to be an Encyclia but tampensis pseudobulbs are smaller and flower spikes arch. I'll hunt some Enc. pics from my greenhouse. Either way, it's on its way to heaven since it's an epiphyte planted in potting soil and the leaves are dead. I can't figure out how a single pseudobulb with no leaves had the energy to bloom.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

After revisiting the original photos, I retract my Encyclia ID. This orchid is Eulophia graminea, a terrestrial. I grow nearly a dozen species Enc. and didn't recognize the flower. On review, I also realized the mistake with the spike coming from the side of the pseudobulb. Encyclias bloom from the center of the leaf arrangement. Some typical Encyclia pics below. #1 Encyclia tampensis (note pseudobulb and quarter size comparison). #2 Enc. bractescens hanging above tampensis. #3 Enc. alata has upright spike as does #4 Enc. cordigera and #5 Enc. steinbachii, a small one like the first two. I've got several primary crosses and hybrids as well.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Beautiful, BC(Zone 8b)

MaypopLaurel, I'm glad you're on this ID! The petal arrangment look right for Eulophia graminea as opposed to Encyclia tampensis. I agree with your ID.

Miami, FL(Zone 11)

@ growing & MaypopLaure

When I read the first thread by "growing"
I rushed and picked it out, removed it from the pot and took a picture of it, but now that I found that it is a terrestrial orchid, I would like to know if I should re pot it as it may not be a rarity in Florida, but I appreciate every living gift from God

MaypopLaure

Thank you for all those pictures and information, I learned a great deal

Thanks to everyone that, took their time on this "cold case" of a coconut :)

Best regards

Thumbnail by MiamiHeatwave Thumbnail by MiamiHeatwave
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

This orchid is a non-native species considered mildly invasive but not on the noxious plant list in FL. I'd keep it in a pot.

The pot should be tall and thin; at least 8"-10" and the diameter of four or five of those pseudobulbs. Do not over-pot. It should have excellent drainage. I use a double medium for most potted orchids. The bottom 1/3 can be natural aquarium gravel, styrofoam packing pellets cut in 1/2" pieces or wine bottle corks, either synthetic or natural, also cut in pieces. This ensures the roots are never in standing water. If using gravel, line the pot drain with a piece of screen or several layers of coconut husk used for hanging baskets. The remainder of the mix can be commercial orchid fir bark (not pine), a fir bark mix, or coconut bark for orchids or either of those barks and 1/3 leaf mold. Do not use potting soil. Soak the bark overnight and pot the orchid with the pseudobulb above the medium. Don"t water until the top few inches of bark appear dry. It should be in an east or north exposure and protected from direct sun. The potting mix will last two to three years. At that time you can pot up. Do not divide unless there are at least three psudobulbs. The old, leafless pseudobulbs supply energy to the plant until evidently dead.

Growin, thank you for sending me Encyclia hunting. I also ran across Enc. polybulbon, Enc. mariae and Enc. randii. Enc. polybulbon is in bloom. I posted a pic in the Orchid forum under my February blooms.

Miami, FL(Zone 11)

Hi MaypopLaurel
It's been a month, since I first saw your post and though late, I like to thank you for your advice and genuine love of these orchids, it is inspiring to say the least I like you to know that the plant is blooming and doing great, but it is now that I read your post and I have my work cut out since I realize that, is in small pot mostly filled with top soil :(
Sometimes I feel that orchids if they were to have a personality, it would be a weird one because many times, I have done more than what is required of them, with no appreciation on their part and here is one that, against all odds, is thriving............... you go figure
As for your beautiful Encyclias , I am intrigued by them in particular
htxxp://www.flnativeorchids.com/natives_gallery/encyclia_tampensis.htm
I would like to give a try and see if I could grow some, also it would be nice to have a program in which, we could return some to the wild from the ones that we cultivate, I am getting ahead of myself :))

You said "On review, I also realized the mistake with the spike coming from the side of the pseudobulb. Encyclias bloom from the center of the leaf arrangement"

I studied pictures, from the pseudobulb of the encyclias against the bulb from the one I have and you make an incredible observation, I would like to know if maybe, at a particular time both of them, were related
At any rate, I like to thank you, for your kind help and the love for these true gems in the wild
Best wishes


This message was edited Mar 4, 2017 3:04 PM

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I lost track of this thread but recalled a thank you was due for your post. You might enjoy going to meetings at one of the many orchid societies in the Miami area. The Redland Orchid Festival is coming up in May. http://redlandfruitandspice.com/event/orchidfest/ It's the largest in the country. The beauty of this particular show is many vendors from around the world have beautiful species from their native regions. Fairchild Gardens is another great place to enjoy orchids. They lost the entire collection after Andrew but have been rebuilding the collection more actively in recent years now that the landscape is recovering and maturing..

Unfortunately orchid conservation has become a near impossible task as their native habits are destroyed for timber and farming. Propagation by division cannot keep up with habitat destruction. Most species orchids are laboratory grown today; an interesting but complex conversation. Orchids have intricate relationships with their native bio/ecosystems that can only be approximated using controlled laboratory procedures.

Your orchid is unrelated to Encyclia genera. Among other features, Encyclias are epiphytes and yours is terrestrial. I have E. bractescens in bloom now and have been meaning to post it on Orchids forum. Need to do that.

Miami, FL(Zone 11)

Hello MaypopLaurel
Thank you, for your informative post

"Propagation by division cannot keep up with habitat destruction"

Truly sad and I hope that, we find a way to reverse somehow this trend as soon as possible, is simply unacceptable to keep building into areas that, should be left alone as sanctuaries for every living thing that, we are losing forever, like the Miami butterfly

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami_blue

In some of streets of Coral gables, Orchids have been put on some of the trees and have taken hold, I have no idea if a scheme like this would be helpful or not, though I suspect that it is a bit naive compared to the needy legislative work to protect larger areas for endemic flora and fauna

I thank you, for the link

"They lost the entire collection after Andrew"

I remembered it quite well, in particular a business [Orchid Jungle] that took a heavy beating, very nice people the ones that, owned it at the time

"Most species orchids are laboratory grown today; an interesting but complex conversation"

I wish more buyers at eBay knew this before they were to buy "orchid's seeds"

"Your orchid is unrelated to Encyclia genera"

You are right, I just keep it in a well controlled area and I enjoy the blooms

"I have E. bractescens in bloom now and have been meaning to post it on Orchids forum"

I hope that, you decide to post them soon

Thank you and best regards

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