Rainbow Peperomia Dying?

Alameda, CA

My Peperomia was doing so great, growing and growing new leaves and older leaves were getting big. It was about 12 inches tall when over the weekend I found it with about 6 fallen leaves. This has happened twice now and both times over the weekend. I water it on Friday and when I come back on Monday it has fallen leaves and more fall to the touch. Also, some of the leaves and stem esges were dark and felt wilted. I know they get enough water and the soil is not dry.
Any suggestions on what I can do to rescue it?

Thumbnail by Luna_510
Clarksville, TN(Zone 6b)

Your plant may be taking a natural rest and signaling its need by dropping the older leaves. If this is the case, do not water so often and withhold all fertilizer until new growth is obvious.

If it has not been repotted in fresh soil in a long time, it may need repotting. Make sure that the base of the plant has not rotted. Peperomias sometimes develop rot when overwatered, especially if they are in soil that does not drain readily. If the plant was originally potted in spongy, loose soil, over time the soil will break down into smaller particles and compact, reducing its ability to drain properly.

Tap the plant and soil out of the pot. Shake the soil off and wash the roots so you can see what portion of the plant has rotted and what part is still healthy. Using a sharp knife, you can save the parts of the plant that have not yet rotted.

Alameda, CA

Quote from Cville_Gardener :
Your plant may be taking a natural rest and signaling its need by dropping the older leaves. If this is the case, do not water so often and withhold all fertilizer until new growth is obvious.

If it has not been repotted in fresh soil in a long time, it may need repotting. Make sure that the base of the plant has not rotted. Peperomias sometimes develop rot when overwatered, especially if they are in soil that does not drain readily. If the plant was originally potted in spongy, loose soil, over time the soil will break down into smaller particles and compact, reducing its ability to drain properly.

Tap the plant and soil out of the pot. Shake the soil off and wash the roots so you can see what portion of the plant has rotted and what part is still healthy. Using a sharp knife, you can save the parts of the plant that have not yet rotted.


Alameda, CA

Thank you Cville,
I had not repotted this plant has been sitting in the same soil for almost two years. The leaves remaining look healthy but it lost a lot of leaves. Just went out and bought some soil and will be repotting it today.. we'll see how it turns out. I'm new to this, so as long as I can keep it alive, I will be happy.
Thanks for your advice!

This message was edited Oct 30, 2018 6:43 PM

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