IS my Jasmine plant healthy? recommend ProMix High Porosity with Mycorrhizae?

vancouver, Canada

I have a one year old jasmine. it's been 2 month that leaves turned to yellow , curly and fall off. even new leaves. what do you think? Is it due to some nutrition deficiency ? or too much chemical fertilizer?what Can I do?Is PRO MiX High Porosity Growing with Mycorrhizae good to change soil ?

Thumbnail by a2008
Powder Springs, GA(Zone 7b)

It does look a bit chlorotic. I would give it more light to see if you can get it to start growing again. I would hesitate on any more fertilizer until it improves or use a very weak solution to see if this will jump start it. As for changing the soil out, that will put more stress on the plant at this point. It's a 50-50 chance that it will help or hinder the plant's growth. I trust that the soil is not too wet at this point - the picture shows that the surface looks normal except for some debris on it.




(Zone 9b)

Butch, do you think it could be spider mite infested? I used to get them all the time on my brugs.

Here is a photo of a badly infected plant. Mites are hard to see but sometimes you can see the webbing over the leaf especially the back side.
http://www.dwpicture.com.au/picture_wcr.asp?image_number=108937&picture=108937&cat=Plant%20Pests&cat2=Plant%20Pests&cat3=

Powder Springs, GA(Zone 7b)

Could be Kelly but without any evidence, it is hard to say right now.

vancouver, Canada

Quote from hcmcdole :
It does look a bit chlorotic. I would give it more light to see if you can get it to start growing again. I would hesitate on any more fertilizer until it improves or use a very weak solution to see if this will jump start it. As for changing the soil out, that will put more stress on the plant at this point. It's a 50-50 chance that it will help or hinder the plant's growth. I trust that the soil is not too wet at this point - the picture shows that the surface looks normal except for some debris on it.





Hmmm. Past 2 month it had sufficient light! though I live in westcoast and winter is not that much sunny.

This message was edited Apr 22, 2020 8:06 PM

vancouver, Canada

Quote from Kell :
Butch, do you think it could be spider mite infested? I used to get them all the time on my brugs.

Here is a photo of a badly infected plant. Mites are hard to see but sometimes you can see the webbing over the leaf especially the back side.
http://www.dwpicture.com.au/picture_wcr.asp?image_number=108937&picture=108937&cat=Plant%20Pests&cat2=Plant%20Pests&cat3=


Actually had Spider mites 5 months ago and sprayed plant with insecticidal soap once a month but didn't change it to healthy plant!!

(Zone 9b)

Spider mites are really tough to get rid of. I really doubt insecticidal soap will touch them. The trouble being you have to drench every single mite and egg to kill them. They take only 1 week to produce a whole new generation. So if you do not get every single 1 with spray which is just about impossible, spraying once a month is insufficient. Is that how often the bottle recommended?

Spider mite insecticides are very expensive because the mites mutate to adapt to them so their effectiveness is time limited. So new chemicals have to be created frequently which is expensive. I use to rotate between 3 kinds hoping to prolong the time before they got resistant. I remember 1 cost me $300. LOL I actually bought a very fancy mister to totally envelop my brugs. I wore a hazmat suit.

I had tried neem and insecticidal soap and all sorts of things you can buy at Home Depot. I was growing the mite attractor brugmansias in great numbers. I was very serious about it. I even rented a small plot of land to grow out my seeds. LOL Anyway, I had to leave all the cheap options behind and special order the newest miticides as they came on to the market.

I eventually stopped growing them because I felt my garden was a toxic dump. If I was to do it all again, I would invest in mite predators and give biological control a chance.

When I was down to just a couple brugs, I never got another mite. I read that mites love the fresh new foliage so by force feeding my brugs to try to induce flowering their first year, I had invited them all to breakfast, lunch and dinner. Live and learn!

Powder Springs, GA(Zone 7b)

There are plants that "seem" more appetizing to spider mites than others. I also find that the same plants grow so much better outdoors that the spider mite problem "seems" to disappear.

Rinsing the pests off the leaves helps a lot (maybe another reason they do better outdoors?) but rinsing indoors is a bit of a problem especially if you have a lot of houseplants and wanted to do it daily. Only during droughts do I see a more pronounced spider mite problem outdoors. PS - you can buy predator mites to handle the pesky spider mites. There are some nurseries (commercial growers) who use this approach instead of massive spraying/systemics. I did that at our last home to the greater outdoors.

One of the reasons I will pinch any leaf off an elephant ear/philodendron that shows a massive outbreak of spider mites (indoors more than outdoors) is to get rid of a huge infestation and a sick leaf or leaves that do nothing for the plant but is still a food source for the pests. I have cut off all the leaves of a plant that has a bad outbreak of most anything (mites, white flies, fungus). New leaves will emerge soon and look healthy once more. This also gives me a chance to spray the stems to "hopefully" remove the remainder of the pests/fungus.

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