SOLVED: Clematis ID

Lincoln, NE

I’m brand new around here, sorry if I’m posting in the wrong way. I live in a rental and the “lawn” is full of—oddly enough—clematis stumps. Most of them are directly in the middle of the lawn so they get mowed down but there are a few around the edges I’m doing my best to protect. However, I’m worried by how many seedlings they must’ve put out that it might be Clematis ternifolia, an invasive in my area. Unfortunately, I’ve never seen them bloom because they usually get mowed before they get a chance. Is anybody a clematis expert who can identify these by foliage only? I’d like to know whether I should bother saving these guys.

Thumbnail by NebJay Thumbnail by NebJay Thumbnail by NebJay
Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

Smooth margins = Clematis ternifolia = DIE DIE DIE

Toothed/dentate margins = Clematis virginiana = native vine

Don't bother saving, and enjoy mowing them off. They still won't give up...

Lincoln, NE

Quote from ViburnumValley :
Smooth margins = Clematis ternifolia = DIE DIE DIE

Toothed/dentate margins = Clematis virginiana = native vine

Don't bother saving, and enjoy mowing them off. They still won't give up...


Any chance it could be a big-flowered hybrid like C. jackmanii? There are several other plants scattered randomly in the yard like species tulips and sedum that suggest previous tenants or owners might’ve been doing some gardening, so I was hoping these might just be strangely placed plantings.

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

You can always wait and see. These two species bloom later in the summer.

The big-flowered hybrids come on earlier in the year.

I've never seen the favored species/clones/selections sprout out in a lawn area. But one can dream...

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