Brooklyn, NY

Very basic question, I'm sure... I was planting a shrub and came across a whole lot of these guys. Grubs, I assume -- but what kind, how bad are they, and how best to combat them? I'm open to both organic and non-organic solutions (at the risk of being judged ;- ) Overall, soil is pretty healthy, and many things are doing just fine. But my shrubs are a little hit or miss (pieris/andromeda, kalmia/mountain laurel, and azalea). Thanks for suggestions!

Thumbnail by fredmogul Thumbnail by fredmogul Thumbnail by fredmogul
Minot, ND

These appear to be 'white grubs', larvae of scarab beetles. They feed primarily on roots of grasses, and some species (including the Japanese beetle) can be quite destructive turf pests. See https://extension.unh.edu/resource/white-grubs-fact-sheet for a fact sheet and https://www.saferbrand.com/articles/how-to-kill-grubs-in-lawn for some control suggestions.

Brooklyn, NY

Quote from Flapdoodle :
These appear to be 'white grubs', larvae of scarab beetles. They feed primarily on roots of grasses, and some species (including the Japanese beetle) can be quite destructive turf pests. See https://extension.unh.edu/resource/white-grubs-fact-sheet for a fact sheet and https://www.saferbrand.com/articles/how-to-kill-grubs-in-lawn for some control suggestions.


Thanks, Flapdoodle. This is a perennial garden, not a lawn. Seems like most of the information on grubs relates to grass.

Minot, ND

There are many other species of scarabs whose larvae are found in soil but that do not feed on grass roots. For example, I often find grubs of beetles in the genus Cotinus in our vegetable garden soil, where they appear to be feeding on decomposing organic matter found there - I have never seen any evidence of them harming any of the plants there. So, unless you find grubs in direct association with shrub roots and/or see evidence of feeding damage, you may not need to worry too much.

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or sign up to post.
BACK TO TOP