SOLVED: Tree id

Havre De Grace, MD

This is the leaf and fruit of a very large tree that has planted its babies all through my friends gardens. Do we pull up the young’uns ?
Thanks loads, lovepat

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Powder Springs, GA(Zone 7b)

Bradford pear? A picture of the tree (tree shape and limb arrangement would help)

Havre De Grace, MD

Thank you hcmcdole! I looked carefully at many pictures of Bradford Pears and I think your id is correct, Especially when I consider how it has invaded all her gardens. The only thing that doesn’t “compute” is how huge the old mother tree is. I have always thought of Bradford pear as a big but not huge. Maybe they usually die before they get so tall with a stout trunk. Anyway. Truly appreciate your response. Now I know that all those baby trees do not need rescue! lovepat

Powder Springs, GA(Zone 7b)

I think a lot of Bradford pears here in Atlanta get to 30 feet tall or taller but I just read that they can get to 60' - wow I don't think I've seen one that big. Usually a storm will split a lot of limbs off the trunk (weak limbed is what I have read). If they were not overplanted here, I might've considered one. Here are some trees in our neighborhood - blooming and fall colors.

First one is blooming first day of spring - 2015

Second one is the same trees in fall but it was almost Thanksgiving, 2013



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Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

They were planted with abandon here when dogwood blight killed our beautiful native dogwoods that made springtime in Atlanta almost as well known as cherry blossoms in D.C.. Fast forward twenty years and they are now considered an invasive species here. They smell like a cross between fish oil supplements and a cat box. They cross pollinate with fruit producing pears and ruin the fruit. They branch wildly from a central trunk which makes them weak limbed. This causes havoc with power lines during storms. Their planting has become so regretted by the city that you can cut them down without a permit.

Powder Springs, GA(Zone 7b)

There is another pear tree in bloom that smells like cat litter and what I describe as a mix of Comet scouring powder and a grease soaked griddle (I used to clean a diner's griddle every night for two years when I got out of HS with Comet) - what a smell that was. I hadn't noticed the same smell with Bradford pears but I wouldn't doubt it.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I'd like to see semi-resident tree expert, Viburnum Valley, weigh in with an opinion on these trees.

Powder Springs, GA(Zone 7b)

Quote from MaypopLaurel :
I'd like to see semi-resident tree expert, Viburnum Valley, weigh in with an opinion on these trees.


Me too!

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