SOLVED: mystery flower

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

dwdruley, the Google answer service sounds more and more tempting. Thanks for the offer to be a contributor! :o)

Ocean Springs, MS(Zone 8b)

htop, I will contribute also.

Vi

Blenheim, New Zealand

Still waiting . have you heard any thing more

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

stetchworth, thanks for the offer. When I finally give up, I'll let you know.
bootandall, I obviously still have not located this plant; but, I haven't given up ... yet.

Blenheim, New Zealand

Good on you.htop... I don't know where else to look

Spring Valley, CA(Zone 10a)

Here's a Rothmannia manganjae tree that is native to Kenya. This particular image was taken at the botanical garden in Brisbane, AU.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v163/grant_fnq/DSCF1456.jpg

-Ron-

Northern, IN

Great work, Ron.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Thanks for the photo, Ron. I have been thinking that it is not a Rothmannia due to the number of petals and the shape and texture of the bloom plus no one has been able to find a photo that looks exactly like it. But I sure could be wrong. I have found 2 photos that resemble the bloom almost to a "T", but one was a lily and the other was a low growing plant. When I saw both photos, not knowing what they were yet, I was very relieved and thought I had finally found it ... but my excitement sadly turned to frustration. I am thinking of taking the photos to Dr. Moy at the San Antonio Botanical Garden.

porthacourt, has it developed seeds, seedpods or fruit yet? Is the midrib on the backside of the leaf reddish? What I find interesting and real clues to its identity are the leaves which have the veins not meeting at the midrib (they are set off a bit or appear to be), the prominent veining on the backside of the leaf and the "nodes" or whatever they are called where the lateral branches extend from the main branches.

This message was edited Jan 11, 2005 10:05 AM

Spring Valley, CA(Zone 10a)

Well, I just read through this whole thread. Portharcourt also mentions that the plant smells lightly like gardenia. Both Gardenia and Rothmannia belong to the Rubiaceae. As a matter of fact Rothmannia capensis is referred to as 'wild gardenia' in South Africa. Another bush that is closely related to Rothmannia is Randia, so you might want to check that out as well.

Personally, it looks like a species of Rothmannia to me.

-Ron-

Fremont, CA(Zone 9a)

Bump!

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

I have been searching for this one for months. Did it ever make a fruit, seedpod, etc?

This message was edited Jul 21, 2005 6:25 AM

Frederick, MD(Zone 6a)

About once every few weeks, I keep searching. Has anyone ever come up with a clue as to this ?

Dea

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

Dea, I sent a D mail to Portharcourt to see if he ever heard anything from the man in Camaroon. I hope he's still a member and gets this mail.

Port Harcourt, Nigeria

It is still a mystery, the man in Cameroon didn't reply, I just refer to it as my mystery Rothmannia, have since propagated many more. No fruit or seed pods form, it just rots away but it grows from cuttings, I get about a 50% success rate.

Blenheim, New Zealand

glad to here you are still there. It is great it will grow from cuttings.

Frederick, MD(Zone 6a)

That is good news that it grows from cuttings.

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

let's call it Rothmannia Portharcourtii, lol.

Mol, Belgium(Zone 8a)

This is a link to a very small picture of Rothmannia megalostigma, the only one I've found in Internet. The leaves are the same as the one Portharcourt is trying to identify. The buds also seem to have the same appearance. The bloom in the picture seems to be dried so it's impossible to compare with it.
http://homepage.univie.ac.at/Christian.Puff/images/WA-1322,25-Rothmannia-megalostigma_small.jpg

I've got the link from this Rubiaceae list. It comes from West Africa.
http://homepage.univie.ac.at/Christian.Puff/Rublist.htm

Regards

Carlos

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

I have been searching for this one on and off all year.

Carlos, the leaves of Rothmannia megalostigma sure look like those on Portharcourt's plant. Although the mystery plant's leaves have a more narrow point on the tips, it may be due to the angles of the photos.

Portharcourt, when I copied and blew up and digitally enhanced the photo to which Carlos added a link, it appears that the dried bloom may have 6 petals, but it was still difficult to determine.

Port Harcourt, Nigeria

The veins on the back of the leaves of my plant stick out in the same way are more brown, run to the edge and then curve up parallel to the edge in a way this example doesn't.

Thumbnail by portharcourt
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

In this larger photo of Rothmannia megalostigma, the veins appear to curve parallel to the edge as your leaf does; however, the veins are more dark.

http://homepage.univie.ac.at/Christian.Puff/images/WA-1322,25-Rothmannia-megalostigma_web.jpg

Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Definitely a close relative. I'll be able to post a photo of a seed pod tomorrow.

Thumbnail by portharcourt
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Yes, a view of the seed pod may prove to be helpful.

Gamleby, Sweden(Zone 7a)

portharcourt, I hope you dont mind. I have also looked for the Id for your beauty, and came up short. I took your photos and mailed them to Professor Chrisitian Puff that was posting the Rothmannia megalostigma pictures. I hope he reads and answeres his mail and maybe have an answere for us.
Janett

Port Harcourt, Nigeria

I am very happy that so many people are taking an interest. I have just got a new gardener who tells me it is quite commonly seen in the bush. The contents of the seed pod was used by the Ibo people for Uli (body painting) http://www.prm.ox.ac.uk/uli.htm. This pod was from a friends Rothmannia x which is about 5 years old. It was an old pod and rotten inside. Mine haven't produced a seed pod yet.

Thumbnail by portharcourt
Castro Valley, CA(Zone 9a)

portharcourt, great news!!!! i could not get the URL, can you send it again please, I have been following this story all the way through!!
Annie

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

I showed this picture to my husband. He said it was a philianthrus campogee.
Then he told me he made that name up. Grrrrrr.

Fremont, CA(Zone 9a)

There was an extra period at the end of the Uli link Try this http://www.prm.ox.ac.uk/uli.htm

Castro Valley, CA(Zone 9a)

Wow, that was quite interesting! Thanks PotEmUp for fixing it.
Do you think you have the Uli plant? Fascinating to say the least.

Lincoln, United Kingdom(Zone 8a)

hi, just stumbled across this, very interesting. My first impressions were the leaf reminded me of eriobotrya, the way the flower hangs of brugmansia! of course the will be many similarities in many species. Having read through the above, the Rothmannia and Rubiaceae theory looks promising, so I did a search for 'flowering plants indigenous to Nigeria', and come up with several interesting links. One here of plant studies for medicinal purposes lists many found wild, only the one belonging to this group, Diodia scandens, the height 3 metres, but flowers don't sound quite right, can't find a photo.

The link may be useful anyway, so here it is'

http://www.siu.edu/~ebl/leaflets/obute.htm

Lincoln, United Kingdom(Zone 8a)

here is a link to lots of African plant links, with more links......

http://www.calacademy.org/research/library/biodiv/biblio/afriplants.htm

Lincoln, United Kingdom(Zone 8a)

another with lots of rubiaceae in Gabon

http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/Research/lope_ckl.shtml

Spring Valley, CA(Zone 10a)

I posted this on another site and they said that this plant was Rothmannia maculata.

-Ron-

Frederick, MD(Zone 6a)

Thanks Ron, what a great thread this is. I still keep searching :)

Dea

Mol, Belgium(Zone 8a)

Ron, there isn't an species with the name Rottmannia maculata. There is one called Randia maculata which is a synonym for Rothmannia longiflora but, and it's just my opinion, this unknown isn't a R. longiflora.

Regards

Carlos

Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Kew Gardens did come back to me with an ID Rothmannia Longiflora, adding that most specimens have 5 petals. I'm doubtful though, having searched through the literature, not only does the Longiflora have 5 petals in every illustration I've seen, it has a different shape flower and less pink speckling in the centre. So I'm still investigating.

Blenheim, New Zealand

you might have a sport,have your cutting flowered yet??

Port Harcourt, Nigeria

I have to wait about three years, so probably won't be here by then, but I have 8 plants now, about a metre high, all doing well and the parent tree is blooming continuously and producing the odd seed pod.

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

i just saw this thread and the first thing that came to mind was Strophanthus gratus altho my flowers weren't that exact color. i have to do alittle research. edited to add a picture of S. preussii http://florawww.eeb.uconn.edu/acc_num/198500461.html

This message was edited Jan 22, 2006 6:28 PM

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

doing alittle more research i was able to come up with various sources that sited as many as 28 species in this genus (all from africa), altho some of that info may be outdated. in the picture above where you showed the whole plant, my feeling of being in the Strophanthus genus increases because it appears to be a scandent shrub with alot of suckering. i had the species gratus which did the same and was often listed in the vine section of books altho i would not personally have called it a vine. altho i have alot of species names i haven't come across many pictures even doing google searches, but i am still looking.

This message was edited Jan 22, 2006 8:31 PM

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