Variegated Meyer Lemon

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

I've been searching for a variegated Meyer Lemon ever since I read jester's response on the Central Texas April 23 RoundUp thread. I goggled for it and found a question to Acorn Springs Farms regarding the variegated Meyer Lemon. I called them and was told that to their knowledge there was no such thing. They said that those sold as Variegated Meyer Lemon here in Texas were actually Variegated Eureka Lemons, also know as Variegated Pink Lemon. I then called the Texas A & M Citrus Center in Weslaco. The man in charge of ordering the budwood sold to nurseries in Texas was very kind and willing to share all kinds of information. He said that if there was a variegated Meyer Lemon any where that it would be in California. He called back a few minutes ago. There is not such things as a Variegated Meyer Lemon. I found Calalily's photo of her "Variegated Meyer Lemon" and it's exactly like the Variegated Eureka Lemon I left back home. Eureka lemon trees are upright with larger leaves. The tree has a slightly more open look. The Meyer lemon is bushier, more compact and has smaller leaves. The branches tend to droop as they grow. : - (

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Thanks for the info, bettydee. The Eureka is a bit less cold tolerant than the Meyer, so I won't push my luck by trying one here.

East Texas, United States(Zone 8a)

Bettydee thanks for the info and for all your effort in researching this matter. I was already aware that what I had was possibly not a variegated meyer lemon and the "pink" name had come up. Strangeley, the name has stuck and everyone knows what you're talking about when you say var. lemon (at least that has been my experience). I've had mine close to 3 years, has grown up a storm though it has not produced fruit. It is possible that I am the cause since I've been pruning this tree in order to make it bushier. In any case, I think the foliage is wonderful and it's noticeable from a distance. I hope you find one, if I see them somewhere i'll let you know. I'm in zone 9a, trees are growing inground, and I have not provided any protection during our mild winters.

Deep South Coastal, TX(Zone 10a)

I agree, I bought a variegated Eureka lemon and it is identical to my varigated Meyer lemon, they both have variegated fruit with pink flesh. It came thru 26* with minimal damage, but it was only one night and it had a blanket over it.





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San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

I'm not having any luck up loading pictures right now but I will bring pictures and a leaf to the roundup this week end . I have no real knowledge of fruit and can only go off of the sellers label. I do know its Variegated and Lemon. I also know my 6 year old claims 100% ownership in the tree (about 4 foot tall) because he "picked it out" .
George in San Antonio

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

George,
Down load your photos to your hard drive.
Come back to this thread.
Scroll down to Post a a reply to this Thread.
Write your message.
Click on the Browse button below.
Browse through your hard drive until you find the phot you want to add to your message.
Click the Open button. This will take you back to this thread.
Click the Preview Button. Depending on how large the picture file is, it may take a while for the Preview to show up. Be patient.
When the preview shows up, click the Send button.
You can upload only 1 photo at a time. So you have to repeat to upload more phots.

I won't be able to go to the RoundUp this weekend so if you could get some photos uploaded, it would be nice.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

My Kodak easyshare ain't easysharing. It will no longer transfer the pics to the computer. I am trying to get it fixed. I bet your right on the ID though.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

It was exciting for a while thinking that a variegated Meyer Lemon might exist. I really like Meyer lemons and was looking forward to gettiing a variegated one.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Well, maybe it is time that someone gets busy and creates one. There are many, many crosses in the citrus world. I nominate you, bettydee, to lead the effort.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

I need to go buy a Meyers and cross polinate it with my Variegated Lemon tree and see what happens. ???
It COULD work, right?

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

It could indeed work. A place to start, at the very least. Also try crossing the varigated lemon with a tangerine. According to some sources, that's how the Meyer was developed (lemon/tangerine cross) and why Meyer fruit is larger, less sour and more cold tolerant than regular lemons.

Auburn, AL(Zone 8a)

Oh I just can't wait till I get lemons and limes! Pink, purple, yellow whatever I don't care as long as I get them!

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Jester, I don't mean to discourage you, but you need to be aware that with citrus, it's not as easy as pollinating one with the other. Citrus genetics is very interesting and can get very complicated. The visual diversity of the genetic material, in say a Eureka Lemon, may be so subtle that it takes several generations of backcrosses to verify these differences. The Improved Meyer Lemon, a cross between a lemon and a mandarin orange, may be even more diverse.

One seed produces up to eight seedlings. Of those seedlings, some are identical to the parent which produced the fruit. The rest are hybrids of the parents. I couldn't get any information whether the variegation trait is dominant or recessive. To stabilize the desired traits, such as variegation, you have to backcross to the parent or plant with the desired trait at least 5 generations and to do that the citrus hybrid has to bloom and fruit. Given that citrus seedlings take an average of 7 years to bloom, it would take about 35 years to see if you have succeeded. In citrus, viability and stability of the seed is dependent on whether the parents are grafted, come from grafted parentage or seedling only lines.

I couldn't find any evidence that the Citrus Centers here in the US or in the countries that carrying on citrus research are involved in crossing the variegated Eureka with the Meyer lemon.

I wish you the best of luck if you wish to try hybridizing the two.

East Texas, United States(Zone 8a)

here's one of two var. meyer lemon (or whatever it's called) we have. both are the same size. two year olds, no fruit yet, probably 'cause I'm always pruning to make them bushier. They weren't the best looking seedlings but they sure have come along and are really noticeable from a distance. I really love my "whatever they're called" trees.

Auburn, AL(Zone 8a)

LOL Voss can you come and love on my lime and lemon trees?

East Texas, United States(Zone 8a)

thanks araness. You know, I consider myself a late bloomer in the gardening ways, but I might have a knack for nursing plants. The other day I rescued a rose the owner was going to throw away because it so pitiful (and it was). A month later the thing is gorgeous. I will post a pix later when some blooms open. If somebody had told me even 5 years ago that I was going to be nursing plants to health (rather than killing everything in sight) I would have laughed hysterically....

Auburn, AL(Zone 8a)

LOL...I'm still at the kill on sight stage.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

I think everyone has killed a plant or two. I have. I'm still struggling to find the right spot for my true Bay tree, Lauris nobilus. In San Jose I had a big, beautiful healthy plant in a 24" pot growing in the shade of a large pecan tree. It got morning sun. I gave it to one of our sons when we moved.


Maybe it's the heat. It could also be the humidity, but my Bay tree was has not been very healthy. I'm hoping it recovers and grows this year.

Auburn, AL(Zone 8a)

I have a ficus (his name is Fred) who is the only plant I've ever been able to keep alive. And I think he thrived on neglect. Fred is about my age (lets just say he's past 30) and while he might not be the prettiest tree on the block I love him. The rest of the plants I've had...well lets just say it wasn't a quick or painless death.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Fred has got to be a tough old bird. That last sentence is a blast. Thanks for the laugh.

I have a Sinningia pusilla "White Sprite" that I bought in 1978 when we lived near Cincinnati. It traveled to California and came with me when we moved here. I nearly lost it when I left it with a neighbor in November while we went on vacation. I managed to salvage 3 tuber like rhizomes. I replaced all the soil and placed them in a different pot in a terrarium. Here's a photo of it taken in February.

Auburn, AL(Zone 8a)

That's pretty...but it has flowers...those are the ones that suffer the most with me. I don't know what I do wrong with them that they hate me.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

I got my Variegated Eureka Lemon yesterday! Since true lemons are more cold sensitive, it's in a pot. It will be a while before I get lemons, but I can wait.

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