Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( White )

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Frostweed (Verbesina virginica)

Frostweed is also known as white crown-beard and ice plant. It is starting to bloom in September. Shown here starting to bloom in September in Bexar County.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Lazy Daisy, Doze Daisy, Dozedaisy, Arkansas Lazy Daisy, Texas Lazy Daisy (Aphanostephus skirrhobasis), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, annual,

With a very high heat tolerance and very low water requirement, it is an excellent xeriscape plant - great for rock gardens. It starts out as a very small inconspicuos plant, then beomes very bushy, 6-18 inches tall and 1-2 feet in diameter (it makes a mound) depending upon the growing conditions. The 1 inch blooms which appear prolifically are white with yellow centers and resemble an aster. The foliage is a silver-green or a greyish-green. Because the blooms close at night and then take a while to open in the morning, its commomly called a "lazy daisy" and/or "doze daisy".

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/57959/index.html

Growing in a wedge between a sidewalk and a street curb where it is terrifically hot and dry.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Lazy Daisy, Doze Daisy, Dozedaisy, Arkansas Lazy Daisy, Texas Lazy Daisy (Aphanostephus skirrhobasis)

A closer view of the blooms ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Lazy Daisy, Doze Daisy, Dozedaisy, Arkansas Lazy Daisy, Texas Lazy Daisy (Aphanostephus skirrhobasis)

The blooms close at night into a tight ball and then open as the morning progresses. The closed blooms themselves are attractive. I just love this plant.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Rain Lily, Fairy Lily, Zephyr Lily, Autumn Rain Lily (Zephyranthes candida), Amaryllidaceae Family, perennial, naturalized, blooms late summer to early fall

This rain lily has large blooms and forms nice large clumps.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2536/index.html

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Snow-On-the-Mountain, Euphorbia marginata, Euphorbiaceae Family, Texas native, annual

One to three feet high. Plant usually starts as a single tall stem dividing toward the top. Leaves are large, oval and a strong grayish-blue green with entire margins. Toward the inflorescence the leaves get narrower and have a white margin. The white margins get broader as they near the top. Snow-On-the-Mountains differ from Snow-On-the-Prairie in that the leaves of the latter are narrower.

At the top of the plant are what appear to be 5-petaled "flowers." These are not flowers, but involucral cups that contain the real flowers. The milky white sap that can irritate the skin in humans is also toxic to livestock. It is seldom fatal to them, but it causes mouth and gastrointestinal irritations that lead to severe weight loss and may take months to recover.

Note: Texas Wildflowers by Campbell and Miller, pg 97, describe Snow-On-the-Prairie, use the correct scientific name, but call it Snow-On-the-Mountain.
For more information, see the PlantFiles
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/8109/

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Snow-On-the-Mountain, Euphorbia marginata, Euphorbiaceae Family, annual Texas native.

Close-up of an inflorescence.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

Snow-On-the-Mountain, Euphorbia marginata, Euphorbiaceae Family, annual Texas native.

Close-up of the stem and its leaves.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

White Flowered Bush Zinnia (Zinnia acerosa), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, subshrub/shrub, evergreen, blloms late spring to early fall

Cross-referenced in the Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Shrubs ) thread

The white flowered bush zinnia is also known as desert zinnia, spinyleaf zinnia, dwarf zinnia, wild zinnia and white zinnia. It is deer resistant. In Texas, it can be found in the Trans-Pecos, Southwest Rio Grand Plains and into the Valley regions. Soil pH should be acidic with a pH above 6.8. It has slender woolly stems and needle-like, 1/2" long, narrow, stiff, grayish-green leaves that have sharp tips. The number of bloom petals varies.

It grows 10 to 12 inches tall and to 2 feet in diameter which makes it a great groundcover. Requiring minimum care, the desert zinnia is useful in harsh arid environments. It is very drought tolerant and will survive with no supplemental water, but wll look a bit ragged and has fewer blooms. It will need a little water to grow to its optimum beauty and produce blooms prolifically. An occasional watering with a hose will suffice if it hasn't rained in a while. Soils must be well-drained soils. Itt makes a great xeriscape, rock garden or wildscape plant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/53451/index.html

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Hedge Parsley, Hedgeparsley, Spreading Hedgeparsley, Beggar's Ticks (Torilis arvensis), Apiaceae Family, naturalized, annual, considered an invasive weed by many

Hedge Parsley's (Beggar's Ticks') light pinkish to white blooms are in the form of compound umbrels with 3 to 8 unequal rays. The plant has pinnately divided leaves.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/32053/index.html

Shown here blooming in late February ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Mexican Devil-Weed, Spiny Aster (Chloracantha spinosa; previously Aster spinosus), Asteraceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms from April through November (more so in late summer and fall), evergreen stems, may be invasive

Mexican devil-weed (Aster spinosus) is a native much branched perennial that is almost leafless. It is occassionally spiny along its stems. It can form hedge-like thickets along the banks of irrigation ditches, bottomlands, in alkaline valley soils and in moist saline soil along river bottoms, pastures, and low places, It also is found growing with cultivated crops, including soybean, cotton, alfalfa and small grain. It blooms from April to October, but primarily in late summer and fall. Propaqgation is by seeds and by widespreading creeping rhizomes. Although it is found in moist soil areas, it also can be found in dry areas. However, it is not as prolific.

For more information, see its entry in the Plant-Files:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/113078/index.html

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Pasture heliotrope (Heliotropium tenellum), Boraginaceae Family, Texas native, annual, blooms spring through early fall

Pasture heliotrope (Heliotropium tenellum) also is commonly known as slender heliotrope and is a native plant. It inhabits dry areas both wooded and open, limestone glades and rocky prairiies. It can reach 40cm (16inches) in height, but it is usually smaller and has many branched narrow stems. It has a taproot as well as some spreading roots. Because the 5-6mm wide blooms are so tiny, it often goes unnoticed.

For more information, see its entry in the Plant-Files:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/80382/index.html

The bloom as photographed in Blanco County ...


This message was edited Mar 12, 2006 4:22 PM

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Pasture heliotrope (Heliotropium tenellum)

A view of the plant a bit farther back ...

Tomball, TX(Zone 9a)

Frostweed, have you or anyone else done the Datura Metel "Belle Blanche"? I have some seedlings started but not sure if I want to plant them. Think they are worth the space? Package says 3 feet tall. jackie

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Hello, I have only done the plain datura or Jimsonweed. Last year someone gave me the double white, and I bought a litttle plat of the double purple, which turned out to be beautiful.
You could try some od the Belle and see whow you like them, I think all plants deserve a chance, so go ahead and try them.
Josephine.

Tomball, TX(Zone 9a)

will do, thanks! jackie

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Wild Strawberry, Virginia Strawberry, Scarlet Strawberry (Fragaria virginiana), Rosaceae Family, Texas native, perennial, blooms late Spring through mid-summer.

Virginia strawberry or wild strawberry is a groundcover that emerges from a fibrous, perennial root system. The leaf petioles, which can be up to 6 inches long, each bear a single trifoliate deep green serrated leaf. The leaflets are roundish to oblong. The flower stalk has a loose cluster of small, five-petaled flowers which are followed by very sweet wild strawberries. The wild strawberries are much smaller than "store bought" ones, 90 per cent of which are hybrids developed from this native species and a South American strawberry. The other 10 percent of cultivated starwberries have Coastal Strawberry (Fragaria chiloensis) as the source parent. Virginia strawberry can be distinguished from the Woodland Strawberry (F. vesca) whose sepals point backwards away from the fruit and whose leaves are a lighter green.. The Virginia strawberry (F. virginiana) reproduces itself by seeds and by runners. The Woodland Strawberry (F. vesca) does not produce runners. It is found in fields open slopes and woodland edges. It can grow in a variety of soils, but likes sandy soils best (very acidic to slightly alkaline). If you want more fruit, pinch off the runners. The leaves may be steeped in boiling water to make tea. Like the fruits, the leaves are high in vitamin C. The plants need watered every 2 weeks if experiencing a drought. Virginia Strawberry can withstand frosts and is evergreen in my Zone 8b. It does well as a cultivated groundcover given dappled sun, full sun or morniing sun. Fruit production is best when the plants are given full sun. It may be container grown.

For more information see the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/31464/index.html

The bloom is similar to the F. vesca bloom shown above. Here is a ripening fruit that shows the sepals encasing the fruit rather than flaring back away from it.

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Barbara's Buttons, Marshallia caespitosa, is a perennial wildflower of Texas and some other states. Marshallia caespitosa is the botanical name of this cold-hardy plant, which forms a rosette over the winter. It has round white flower heads and blooms every Spring, growing to heights up to 18 inches at that time.

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Butterflies and insects just love them! Another view of Barbara's Buttons.

College Station, TX(Zone 8b)

Capeweed, Creeping Lip Plant, Frog-Fruit, Frog's Bit, Licorice Verbena, Turkey Tangle Fogfruit
(Phyla nodiflora)

A tiny flower found along ditches in my area.

This one has a Martian Face ;

west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

Rain Lily, Fairy Lily, Zephyr Lily (Zephyranthes candida)

Finally decided to grace me with a few blooms. I figure this is a good shot of the foliage. I need to move this back into a clay pot--for some reason I planted it on the east side of the house. Many bulbs just do better in clay pots for me if I don't have the perfect conditions for them..

west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

Here's frostweed; Verbesina virginica about three feet tall in full sun. I posted this to let people know it seems to like the soil on the Katy Prairie too.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Yerba Mansa, Swamproot, Lizard Tail (Anemopsis californica), Saururaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms March through September, bog or wetlands plant

Cross-referenced at Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Aquatic & Bog )

This perennial herb's blooms start out white and then develop reddish pink spots as it matures. The leaves are large, waxy, dull gray-green that lay flat and form mats. They have great veining. It is commonly called "lizard tail" because of the long runners that it produces in the spring. It can be found in marshes, creeksides, and other highly moist areas.

An infusion made from the aromatic roots is used by native Americans of the southwest as a general pain reliever and a treatment for colds, stomach ulcers, and chest congestion.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/59447/index.html

A view of the bloom ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Yerba Mansa, Swamproot, Lizard Tail (Anemopsis californica)

A view of a leaf ...

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Josephine~
I know I'm chimin(g) in late here but I just recently became a subscribing member. It's getting close to the meet in Arlington too, and Sheila just told me about it last week.. so not much time for me to prepare, but I still hope to come.
I am so glad someone initiated a Texas Native Plants Catagory, as i have a few years of pics I have gathered from all over, and of course in my own garden. A few I still haven't identified, but learning about them is important before you plant in your own yard, so i love to learn this way. Such as, does it have a fruit? Can ya eat it? Does it have a fragrance? Will it attract a welcome or unwelcome guest? ..and so on.
After perusing each section I will see if any of the ones I have are already listed and has an available photo. If it is/does. I may or may not post what I have.
Great job y'all! This should make an excellent & fun reference point for us Texas Gardeners..! Native plants are amazing ! A big TexasThankU to everyone contributing here so far!! Nice work!!

~Debnes
This one is > Sweet Alyssum Lobularia maritima (Brassicaceae)
I planted some seeds in Spring that have made an awesome border around a candleush, and they do smell sweet, and definatly have staying power.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Debnes, thank you for joyning us in this fun endeavor, we certainly can use all the information we can get. Looking forward to meeting you at the Dallas swap.
Josephine.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Metz's Wild Petunia, Wild White Petunia (Ruellia metziae), Acanthaceae Family, native, endemic to Texas, perennial, blooms early summer through fall

Metz's Wild Petunia can be found in growing in gravel, limestone outcrops, thickets, fields, prairies and open woods from the Lampasas Plain south and southwest to central Texas and the Edwards Plateau. It loves the heat and can withstand droughts. The fragrant blooms are about 1 to 1.5 inches across and are smaller than the purple or lavendar wild petunias; however, they really show up well due to their pure white color. The plant serves as a butterfly nectar source as well as butterfly larval host It is also highly deer resistant.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/38218/index.html

Flowers in morning sun ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Metz's Wild Petunia, Wild White Petunia (Ruellia metziae)

Another view of a flower ...

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Thx Josephine!
I love these posts! This is such excellent information.
I'm trying to decide what to bring for covered dish, and also working to care for the plants I'm bringing. I might call you tomorrow to scope out some possibilities on the dish if that's alright..

Deb

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

American Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, White Nightshade (Solanum americanum: now is known as Solanum ptychanthum) Solanaceae Family, native, annual or short-lived perennial, blooms early summer through fall (warm areas with no freezes - all year), flower color white or light purple (lavender), some consider it a noxious weed, poisonous

The leaves are alternate and may reach 10cm (4inches) in length and 5 cm (2inches) in width. They areovate or somewhat triangular and entire or irregularly toothed with wavy margins. The stem may be smooth or most of the stem may have have small hairs which are visable under magnification. The 5-petaled, 3/8 inch in diameter flowers have a yellow beak of stamens which droop downward. Sometimes the petals are reflexed.. It has round black fruit ( 5 -10 mm in diameter) that look like black cherry tomatoes and they contain numerous small seeds. All parts of this plant are poisonous. It is thought that the berries lose their toxicity when fully ripe and that wildlife eat them; but, other sources state that when mature they should be considered poisonous as they may contain high levels of solanine. I don't think that I will be eating any. :o)

It occurs natively in woodland edges and openings, beaches, sand dunes, stream and river flood plains, fence rows, chaparrals. Growing in various soil types, it usually can be found in disturbed, abandoned or cultivated areas.
Can be found in 6 counties in the Texas Panhandle region as well as many other counties spread across the state as shown here:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=SOPT7

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/54503

The small bloom (note rain drop on petal - finally had a wonderful rain) ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

American Black Nightshade, Common Nightshade, White Nightshade (Solanum americanum: now is known as Solanum ptychanthum)

Blloms as one views it from above with the flowers hanging downward ...

College Station, TX(Zone 8b)

Here is what I assume is a native plant growing next to frostweed and turks cap. It is about 2ft tall

College Station, TX(Zone 8b)

...and another pic of the same plant. Can anyone ID it?

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

CS, that looks very interesting, are the larger white parts petals? or are they seedpods.
Josephine.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

It looks like it might be Boneset, but I am not sure, is it this one?
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1118/index.html
Josephine.

College Station, TX(Zone 8b)

Hi Frostweed
no I don't think so -here is a close-up

I think they are petals 3 per flower and about 1/8" long

By the way I looked at your TexasStar site it is very nice. I would like to use mostly natives on my site also.

Chris

This message was edited Nov 9, 2006 10:18 AM

Katy, TX(Zone 8b)

Those flowers or whatever they are look to me like a sheep's head w/ the tongue sticking out. Really, especially the one to the left of center with all that green line. Really cute!

Ann

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

That sure looks different, I will have to do some investigating, maybe Hazel or Linda know what it is.
I think it is really neat.
Josephine.

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Whoa, that's an intriguing plant! I'm not familiar with it and couldn't find anything in the wildflower book that has wildflowers by color. Unless maybe it's a wild buckwheat?...and I don't know what they look like real close-up. Anybody seen those?

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

CSinTexas, I don't know what your plant is but I will research it.

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