Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( White )

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Ladino Clover, White Clover, White Dutch Clover (Trifolium repens)

It is quite showy when in a large mass. These are in a field that will be mowed in about 30 minutes, but it will grow back.

west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

Allium canadense var. fraseri
This Texas native allium has a clear white bloom starting in April. It prefers a drier, well drained location in my garden and can be easily tucked around other perennials or annuals. Bloom height is 18" and this is really a "no-care" plant! This one is definitely not invasive either.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Sure is pretty ... thanks for sharing it.

Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

This morning, while walking the dogs, I noticed this in the empty field next door. does anyone know what it is? So far, it is the only one that I have seen bloom.

Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

Here is a close-up of the foliage close to the ground.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Is there just one flower spike on the plant?

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

It looks like some kind of lily, but the bottom part looks like a succulent.
It is very pretty.
Josephine.

Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

htop, yes, there is only the one spike of tiny flowers on the plant.

And yes, Josephine, the stem and leaves do look like that of a tiny asiatic lily. A few minutes ago, I went outside and there are a couple of new ones in bloom this afternoon. They are only about 10 inches high.

Does it look familiar to anyone?

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

I have been researching your plant for quite sometime. I keep staring at it thinking that I know what it is and it'll just jump out of my mind. I too had been thinking that the leaf arrangement sort of looks like my asiatic lillies. I'll keep digging around to see if I can find it. Do you live in a hilly area of Austin?

Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

htop,

We live in Lakeway, just west of Austin, overlooking Lake Travis. This plant is growing in a vacant lot that has been a dumping ground for rocks, concrete and gravel from the other houses built in this area. On top of the limestone is caliche and very little else. Last year, in an attempt to make it look a little better, I spread about a pound and a half of wild flower seeds on it from the Wild Seed Farm in Fredricksburg. However, I only purchased red poppies, bluebonnets, and larkspur. The rest, I am assuming, are natives.

Does this help?

Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

Could it be white milkwort (Polygala alba)?

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

I had thought that the bloom looks like a milk wort, but I couldn't tell by the photos I had found. I tink that I had dismissed it being Polygala alba because I think that the leaves are different. Still loolking ...

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Well, that was what I was thinking also. It looked kind of like Polygala alba, except for the leaves in the other picture. Is it possible that those leaves weren't on that plant, maybe it just looked like it was? Anyway, I have those blooming now, but the leaves are so linear and wispy-looking, you know.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Heller's Plantain (Plantago helleri), Plantaginaceae Family, native. annual. blooms April through June

Heller's plantain (Plantago helleri) is a plant that is native to central and southwestern Texas and is typically found growing in sandy, limestoney or gravelly soil. The ones I observed ae growing in almost pure limestone. I think it grows from a winter rossette; however, I am not sure about this. It reaches a height of about 8 to10 inches. The fuzzy leaves are more linear and thinner than some other species of plantain. It blooms from April through June. The flower spike is about 3 to 4 inches long and is on a thick fuzzy spathe. There are many bloom spikes arising from the base of the plant that has a taproot. The bloom petals are whitish and translucent. They turn a brownish-tan color as the blooms age. The blooms are followed by capsules which usually contain 2 seeds. It is a host plant for the common buckeye (Junonia coenia). I could find little information about it on the internet or in my native plant books.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=PLHE

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/140909/index.html

Aging flower spike - "petals" when fresh are whitish and translucent.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Heller's Plantain (Plantago helleri)

A view of the plant taken from a low angle ... most of this plant's flower spikes are aging to a brownish-tan. The spikes to the left and at the base of the plant are fresher and show the whitish translucent "petals".

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Redseed Plantain (Plantago rhodosperma), Plantaginaceae Family, native, annual, blooms April through July

Redseed plantain is between 3 and 12 inches tall and has a taproot. Its leaves are arranged basally in a rosette. The hairy, 4 to 27 cm long, 1 to 4.7 cm wide leaves are elliptic to oblanceolate with entire or remotely dentate (have a few widely spaced teeth). They have parallel venation. Long, thin, hairy, hollow flower spathes circle the leaves. Long bloom spikes appear at the end of the spathes. The bloom corolla is lobed with each lobe being 2 to 4 mm long. They are usually erect and cleistogamous (folded together); however, they are sometimes chasmogamous (spreading). The blooms are followed by seed capsules that contain two reddish, 1.5 to 3 mm long seeds. This is another plant that I could not find much information about.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=PLRH

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/140913/index.html

Part of a bloom spike ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Redseed Plantain (Plantago rhodosperma)

Growth habit - notice how the spathes grow horozontally from the base of the plant and then curve upwards. The spathes eventually are in a circle around the plant's base. This is one of its distinguishing characteristics.

Kerrville, TX(Zone 8a)

Hi, maybe I should post this in the id forum but know you guys here are the authorities on native plants. Found this flower on the roadside next to the San Bernard River which is near Brazoria, TX. It is a beautiful little flower! There were only about 15 flowers in the cluster and each flower seems to me to be very unusual. It has a tier of three seed heads absolutely vertical, and the top seed head has a tiny spot of pink on it. I did check the white native plants and don't think it's there but don't know for sure. I imagine Frostweed would be particularly interested. Please let me know if you have any ideas and whether or not it should be posted in the id forum.
Thanks,
Carol

Kerrville, TX(Zone 8a)

This pic shows the three tiers and white & sulphur butterflies were very attracted to it.

Kerrville, TX(Zone 8a)

Sorry, the first pic was blurry. Here's another.

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Looks like Monarda to me...

:-Deb

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Flowerette!! this is so exciting!! I believe what you have is
Monarda punctuta ssp. inmaculata, a Texas endemic plant that is shown to grow in only two counties, so you do have a very unusual plant indeed.
I could not find picture of it, but click on this link for the counties where it has been reported to grow. http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=MOPUI2
Please try to preserve it where it grows.
Josephine.

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Josephine~
Here is a pic of Monarda punctuta I happened to come across, hehe...

http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/monardapunc.html

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Yes, it is the ssp. immaculata that I have not been able to find a picture of.
Of course I don't really know that is what her plant is, but I think so, we shall see if we can find out.

Kerrville, TX(Zone 8a)

debnes_dfw_tx, Thanks for the link. It may be in the same mint family, but if you can see the saw-toothed edges of the leaf in my second picture whereas your picture indicates a smooth edge to its leaf. Maybe we are getting very close. Very interesting!

Frostweed, I am studying your link as well. Geez, wish I had some control over this plant, but it was growing on the opposite side of the street from where my son just finished building his house. There are no buildings where the plant was growing, so hopefully it will survive and return next year. That was a few days ago when I spotted it, so it may be bloomed out by the time I get back down there, but I'll definitely take another look. Who knows -- maybe more will be blooming. Oh, don't hit me -- I did pinch off that tiny flowerhead, and I still have it! I know that's a no-no, but I had never-ever seen anything like it. They were approx. 10 inches, maybe less in height.

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

flowerette~ If that is a crime, I am just as guilty. I really don't know what the rules are on picking wildflowers...or that it would be against them to pick something from a place that might soon be treated with herbacides and covered with turf instead.. Doesn't seem wrong to me. When I get a specimin, I usually like to take the whole root with it. So many of the wildflowers do not take well to transplanting. I am really most interrested in preserving and conserving in my heart of hearts.

Monarda is a paticular favorite of mine. I am not deeply familiar with all the different species of it, just an ardent admirer. The bloom clusters resemble elaborate crowns to me, such an elegant flower. I believe it is attractive to many winged creatures also, which is my main passion. I study them for food value for native benificial insect life, mainly butterflies. Of course what follows that is many species of native birds.. and so on, lol!

If they haul you in, they will have to come get me too, haha!

:-Deb

Kerrville, TX(Zone 8a)

:-Deb:
I am a winged creature hugger as well -- any and all of them -- birds, butterflies, moths, and other insects have a place in my heart, and I mean all of them, well, with the exception of fire ants. As I tell DH, all animals have a right-to-life. Trying to get that over to a hunter doesn't carry much weight :) and, of course, not to forget my very long love of plants. Wouldn't it be neat if this flowerhead actually dried and produced seed! We shall see.
Carol

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

flowerette~
It would be more than neat...it would be a miracle. The best way is to keep watch of the patch you found those in, and when they turn brown you may be able collect the dried seeds from it. According to the specs on propagation that is the way to collect fertile seeds. Maybe the reason for laws about wildflowers, cutting them before they are dead and brown, directly causes displacement from their natural habitat and extinction.

:-D

Kerrville, TX(Zone 8a)

I agree. We only mow our wildflowers after they have turned brown.
Carol

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus), Apiaceae Family, native, annual/biennial, blooms March or April through June/July, considered a noxious weed by many (very hard to get up due to long roots)

American wild carrot, rattlesnake weed, southwestern carrot can be found growing in the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau regions on barrens, meadows, plains, dry hills, roadsides, streambanks and waste areas. It is not picky about soil types. Simple to few-branched and erect, it grows 2 to 3 feet tall and its roots have a characteristic carrot odor. The fern-like and lacy leaves are alternate, pinnate and compound. The stems are retrorsely-hispid (covered in rigid or bristly hairs that are directed back or downwards). The leaves are eaten by white-tailed deer.

The flat to cupped, 1 1/4 to 2 inch wide flowerhead is composed of several tiny, white, 5-petalled, 5-staminated flowers gathered in a compound umbel. They do not have a red or purplish central flower that is characteristic of Queen Ann's lace (Daucus carota). The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and is self-fertile; however, they are pollinated by beetles and flies as well. The flowers are subtended by sturdy, lacy bracts (modified leaves) which support them (and later the fruit). The bracts may be longer than the flower cluster is wide. The flowers are not long lasting and begin turning into fruit quite quickly. The oblong fruit (seed pods) each have two rows of stiff bristles.

The root is edible either raw or cooked (see caution below). The plant is thought to be an antipruritic and blood purifier. It has been used to treat colds, itches and fevers. It obtained the commomn name "rattle snake weed" because a poultice of the chewed plant has been used to treat to snakebites. Recent studies have indicated that it may be a cancer preventative

Cautions:
If the sap contacts the skin of some people, dermatitis and/or photo-sensitivity can occur. The taproot and the leaves are easily confused with poison hemlock (conium maculatum which is one of the most deadly poisonous wild flowering plants. I would be very careful about eating wild carrot as food.

Distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=DAPU3

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/74985/index.html

The flower cluster is composed of several tiny white flowers gathered in a small, compact, 1.25 inch, compound umbel. There is no red or purple central flower as is present in Queen Ann's lace (Daucus carota).

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus)

The unripe fruit are oblong with two rows of stiff bristles and are interesting looking as well as attractive.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus)

The unripe fruit which are subtended by bracts (modified leaves) which support the umbel

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus)

A view of the flower stem showing the hairs that are present and the sturdy bracts that support the umbel

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

American Wild Carrot, Rattlesnake Weed, Southwestern Carrot (Daucus pusillus)

Leaves and retrorsely-hispid stems (Poison hemlock stems do not have hairs. Water hemlock, which is also deadly poisonous, and poison hemlock are often purple spotted or purple streaked.)

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum), Ranunculaceae Family, native, perennial, blooms in April and May

This 1 to 3 foot tall larkspur is an upright, hairy plant that has deep roots. It can be found growing in sandy or clay soils, on coastal prairies and grassy plains, and in pine woods and open woods. The very slender stem is usually unbranched. The leaf blade is distinctly 3-parted and repeatedly divided into narrow segments. They are along the stem or clustered at the base of the plant. It forms a winter rosette. The flowers are borne on a slender raceme that is held a considerable distance above the foliage. The blooms are various shades of blue (sometimes very light bluish-lavender) to white. Its name is derived from the fact that the bloom spur resembles that of a lark. Its Spanish common name, espuela del caballero, is derived from its spur resembling that of a horseman's spur. The Kiowa called larkspur "ton a" which means "gourd seed". This refers to the plants small seeds being used in ceremonial gourd rattles.

Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum hybridizes with D . madrense especially on southern edge of Edwards Plateau in Texas.

Distribution:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=6043&flora_id=1

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/138752/index.html

A mostly white bloom that has pale hints of blue especially on the tips

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

A white bloom showing the darker greenish splotches

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

A white bloom as seen from the back showing how it is attached

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

White bloom as seen from the side showing the spur

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

A plant that has darker blooms. The anthers are olive-greenish brown and stand out against the pale colors of the bloom.

Post a Reply to this Thread

You cannot post until you , sign up and subscribe. to post.
BACK TO TOP