Texas Native Plant Pictures by color ( White )

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

Inflorescence which is a slender raceme - each flower has a pair of opposite bracts at the base.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Terrific pictures Hazel, you are building a wonderful library of Native Texas Plants.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Prairie Larkspur, Pine woods Larkspur, Blue Larkspur, Gulf Coast Larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. vimineum)

Leaf blades which are 3-parted and repeatedly divided into narrow segments. They can be at the base and/or along the stem becoming narrower in the upper portions.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Thanks, Josephine. I have a lot of plants to add that I have been unable to identify as of yet. Sometimes I feel like I am doing research work for a thesis. :o) I am learning a lot and enjoying it.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Hello girls, since you love Monarda, here is a lovely group of Monarda punctata art Pappy Elkins Park, don't you just love it?

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Very beautiful Josephine! I so love Monarda..


Deb

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

This is Daucosma, Daucosma laciniatum, a native plant in the parsley family. It grows in locations in the southern areas of the Texas Hill Country. It can be seen blooming now along soggy roadsides and flooding creeks in those areas. It's a host plant for the Black Swallowtail butterfly.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Wow Linda, that is really pretty, I have never seen it growing around here, but the book Flora of North Central Texas says that it grows around this area, it is an annual and it is Endemic to Texas, so it is a very special plant indeed.
Thank you for showing it to us.
Josephine.

Rowlett, TX(Zone 8a)

Josephine, I've been meaning to say "Thanks" for sharing the photo of the Monarda punctata. Because of that photo, I rescued a smallish plant from a soon-to-be developed plot of land near my local Starbucks. I planted it in my flowerbed and it's growing very nicely. If I hadn't spotted your picture, I would have thought the plant was a clover and would have left it where it was. It's nice to know I have a native (and free!) Bee Balm for the bees and butterflies to enjoy. All because of your picture. :-)

Carla

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Thank you Carla, that is what it is all about, sharing and having a wonderful time doing it.
Josephine.

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Way to go Carla!! I agree, this is a super library for us.

Hazel~ I applaude your finds and explainations!

:-Deb

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Carla, I am so happy that you found the photos here and they have been of use to you and equally happy that you have saved a plant. :o)

Deb, thanks.

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

On our recent trip to the land in Big Thicket I spotted a few fall bloomers, and I could use an extra set of native plant eyes to figure out exactly what they are.

The blooms have a maroon cast, and are about 3/4 inch across, erected on woody stems about 2-3' tall. The leaves are dark green, slim and pointed at the apex.

debnes

#1

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

The bloom cluster on this one is about 1" across..


#2

This message was edited Nov 23, 2007 9:05 AM

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

These bushy plants were growing everywhere. The blooms are about 3/4 inch and look like little paint brushes.. Next a close up of the blooms.

#3

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Close up of #3 (with above)

debnes

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Deb, #1 could be this one Willowleaf Aster, but not sure;
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/139160

#2 Camphor Weed;
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54337

#3 One of the Baccharis, possibly this one;
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/60395/

Josephine.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum), Malvaceae, native, perennial, evergreen, considered a subshrub, blooms throught the year (but, principally Oct-Nov), considered a weed by many

I find it listed as a native Texas plant ; however, the USDA Plants Database does not list it as such. It can be found in dry, rocky open woodlands and prairies from the Edwards Plateau to West Texas.

Shrubby Indian Mallow grows to be up to 40 inches (1 m) tall (rarely taller). The 5-petalled, up to 3/4 inch (1.9 cm) wide flowers (petals may be pink, white, or yellow) each have a dark red basal spot with reddish veins extending from it. The heart-shaped, grayish appearing, velvety leaves are petioled, and somewhat elongated. The velvety foliage (covered in fine stellate hairs) provides interesting texture in a xeric garden. They have sharp or rounded toothed margins. The brown seed capsules have 5 mericarps which helps distinguish it from other species. Each mericarp has 3 seeds which are about 1.8 to 2 mm long To encourage bushy new spring growth, cut it back in the spring. Indian mallow is a larval host plant and a nectar source for several butterfly species including the Texas Powdered Skipper and Common Streaky-Skipper.

There are 2 subspecies:
Abutilon incanum ssp. incanum ( pelotazo)
Abutilon incanum ssp. pringlei (Pringle abutilon, Pringle's abutilon)

Images of Abutilon incanum yellowish blooms can be seen here:
http://wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=1282

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/166681/

White blooms ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum)

Seed capsules ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum)

Flower buds and seed capsules ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum)

Growth habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Indian Mallow, Shrubby Indian Mallow, Hoary Abutilon, Pelotazo, Pelotazo Chico, Tronadora (Abutilon incanum)

Growth habit and a good view of the velvety leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest & Kim Starr

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

What a neat little mallow Hazel! Thanks!

And Thank you for IDing the Thicket plants for me Josephine. :-)

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

debnes_dfw_tx, you're welcome.

Lebanon, OR

I was hoping that I would spot the white flower here that I took it's picture last week while at the Iris convention. I bought two different books on wildflowers native to Texas and for the live of me can not find it...

It is clustered with some stickers on the cluster and the stem. I thought it might be a nettles family member but can not find it anywhere.

The largest picture is blurred but the blooms are not.

I will continue to look.

D

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Could it be Texas Bull Nettle, Cnidoscolus texanus?
http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=3336
Josephine.

Lebanon, OR

No, not that one but will try to post a picture of it as it is driving me nuts.

D

Thank you

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

White Prickly Poppy?
http://www.lostsprings.com/plants.aspx?cat=Flowers&photo=P4123501

Lebanon, OR

No that one was super easy but going to try to get the pictures from the laptop tonight and post it, as it is driving me crazy when I can not pick a family, still think it might be of same family as any nettles.

Thanks for all the help

D

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

How about Carolina horse nettle (Solanum carolinense)?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_horsenettle
http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/PHPPS/ipc/weedinfo/solanum-carolinense2.htm

White horse nettle (Solanum carolinense var. albiflorum) which is often misidentified as bull nettle and may be a synonym for the above plant.
a photo would help in identifying it.

Lebanon, OR

htop might be that but will work hard on getting a picture posted this weekend

D

west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

Allium canadense var fraseri

This is a native Texas bulb--Allium canadense var fraseri which I think holds a lot of actual garden potential for all of Texas and all of the southern US as well. This one is definitely not the very common, weedy, bulbil-spitting, invasive seed-spitting, common form of this species which can be seen here:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/35774/

What's nice about it is its delicate, does not form bulbils or spit seeds and when it melts down, it disappears all at once. I think it would look good nestled in around short scutellaria's such as the native S resinosa or other pink or blue small flowered, short, spring annuals or perennials. My kid used to be into what I loosely call "yard art" when she was younger--now I just use them to mark some bulbs I don't want to accidentally disturb later in the year. Height of the foliage stays about 5", bloom scapes at about 10-12". They are not at their peak yet, but you can see a good close-up shot here and above on this thread:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/149155/

Another, more impressive native TX allium is sending up buds now too--but I'll show you that one when its actually blooming. Both of them should work anywhere in the state of Texas--wet or dry--north or south--and in my opinion, should be used everywhere in the southern US. I'm proud of our native Texas bulbs!

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Me too, I know that you are doing a lot of work with them and that is great.

Lebanon, OR

OK finally am getting this sticky white flower posted and hope someone knows what it is for sure, or for the presentation it will be a white sticky wild flower found near Natural Bridge Cave.:) hee hee

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Well the picture is not very clear, but I think this may be it,
Macoun's cudweed, Pseudognaphalium macounii
one of the Cudweeds also called Everlastings;
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PSMA11
Josephine.

west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

Allium texanum

‘Texas False Garlic’ or ‘White King’ or ‘Texas Wild Onion’

A robust upland species native to seepy, wet situations such as swales and bottomlands, in alkaline clay soil from the hills of Central Texas to Oklahoma. Many flowered dome-shaped umbels (60-100) of chalk white starry flowers with green ovaries appear in late spring (usually during the first months of May) on scapes nearly 2’ tall. The robust foliage is distinctive, being flat, about ½" wide, glaucous, blue, and spiraling. It needs to be well watered while flowering or the buds will abort. This is one of the two largest flowering native Texas wild alliums and was differentiated from Allium canadense var fraseri in 1990 by Thad Howard. Prior to this it was considered Allium canadense var fraseri (yet another strain) but if you grow both of these alliums, like I do, they are as different as night and day with a distinctively different set of physical and ecological characteristics.

Easy to grow, undemanding, drought tolerant (but will appreciate late summer moisture while dormant); an excellent candidate for mixing in the border with daylilies or other late-spring blooming natives and perennials. Good for growing from zones 5-9.

This one shows a group in various stages of opening up and still in bud.

west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

Allium texanum

‘Texas False Garlic’ or ‘White King’ or ‘Texas Wild Onion’

This is a close-up of the bloom.

PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/78505/

edited to change the fact I used a different picture for the PlantFiles which changed this caption.



This message was edited May 13, 2008 9:37 PM

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Very nice Debbie.

west Houston, TX(Zone 9a)

thank you Josephine
=)

TAYLOR, TX(Zone 8a)

Can anyone identify this plant? You can see it alot along our highways.

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