Texas Native Plant Pictures ( Trees )

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Josephine, we have many, many latge beautiful specimens like this one in San Antonio, It is growing in an older neighborhood here so it must be fairly old.

Missouri City, TX(Zone 9a)

You guys are great resources! These are all gorgeous trees. My oven experience, for those who may not have tried some of these, any of the Bird of Paradise trees are easy to grow, very forgiving and put on a great show! The Dessert Willow is also very forgiving- I got one last year as a birthday gift. I had always wanted one because I think they are beautiful- turns out they are not only pretty, but the flowers smell nice as well. That was news to me. My Anacacho Orchid, purchased last year, is young and had only a few flowers last year. Now it is covered with flowers. I love it and also it is easy to grow.
On my wish list for this year is Jeruselum Thorn- they are pretty. There is an apartment complex in Sugar Land that uses 3 or 4 of them along the parking lot- separates the parking lot from the street, so last year I watched them and while many other trees seemed to wither with the heat and drought, they were going strong and just beautiful.
Thanks for all the great pictures!

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

You are welcome, aren't Texas plants beautiful? More people need to get aquainted with them.
Josephine.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

The Texas Mountain Laurel is one of my favorite small trees. My mother had one that was about 10' tall. It is such a slow grower that I've been looking for a large potted one otherwise I'll never live to see it reach a respectable size. I have a 4 year old that's about 6" tall because my DH has shredded it 3 times.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Hello Veronica, maybe you need to build some kind of enclosure around it, so he won't cut it down again by accident.
Josephine.

La Grange, TX(Zone 8b)

I need a large tomato cage. This year the little fig trees I planted in October will be in danger also. I mustn't forget the hose. It used to be one two hundred foot hose. There are 2 splices on it now. I hope my tickweed comes back this year. He got those several times last year , too. :-)
Veronica

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Orchid Tree, Purple Orchid Ttree, Mountain Ebony, Poor Man's Orchid (Bauhinia variegata), Caesalpiniaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen to deciduous, blooms late winter through early summer (intermittenly there after), considered a Category I invasive in Florida

This tree growing near downtown San Antonio has one of the most beautiful blooms I have ever seen. Most of the blooms are 4 to 5 inches across and the tree is covered with them right now. It has been blooming for some time. The blooms are followed by long seed pods. It is winter hardy to 22°F. The Purple Orchid tree does best in acidic soil and are off green under limey conditions and it is not tolerant of salty conditions.

Note: It is often mistaken for Bauhinia purpurea. Bauhinia variegata blooms have petals that overlap; whereas, B. purpurea bloom petals do not overlap. B. variegata blooms, which are self-pollinating, have 5 to 6 stamina (pl. for stamen); whereas, B. purpurea blooms have 3 to 4 stamina. There are other differences as well.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/2403/index.html

The growth habit ... This photo doesn't do it justice.


This message was edited Dec 4, 2006 4:01 AM

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Orchid Tree, Purple Orchid Ttree, Mountain Ebony, Poor Man's Orchid (Bauhinia variegata)

A photo giving a bloom size perspective ... notice the colors of the faded blooms.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Orchid Tree, Purple Orchid Ttree, Mountain Ebony, Poor Man's Orchid (Bauhinia variegata)

A beautiful bloom showing how the petals overlap ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Orchid Tree, Purple Orchid Ttree, Mountain Ebony, Poor Man's Orchid (Bauhinia variegata),

A closer view ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida), Caesalpiniaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen to deciduous, blooms late winter through early summer (intermittenly there after)

This plant is covered which white blooms in the spring. It will bloom less heavily intermittenly throughout the summer and sometimes into early fall.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/130370/index.html

The bloom ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida)

The leaf ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida)

New leaves ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida)

Limb bark ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

White Variegated Orchid Tree, White Butterfly Tree (Bauhinia variegata var. candida)

The unripe seedpods ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Cedar Elm, Olmo, Basket Elm, Scrub Elm, Lime Elm, Texas Elm, Southern Rock Elm (Ulmus crassifolia), Ulmaceae Family, Texas native, evergreen to deciduous, typically blooms August through September, fruit ripens from September to October (flowering dates have been reported as early as July and fruiting as late as November. When flowers appear in August, fruit ripens in September, and then a second flowering and fruiting may occur in October and November, respectively), known to cause severe allergy reactions similar to ragweed reactions

The cedar elm is used frequently as a street tree and small shade tree in the desert southwest due to its ability to survive in difficult soil types with very little care. It is relatively fast growing ang long living. If you need a vertical tree that is more tall than broad, cedar elm fits the bill. It is commonly named "cedar elm" because it is often found with ashe juniper which is locally called "cedar." Leaf fall is late in the year, often in early winter and It provides vivid yellow color to the landscape (except in the southern part of the tree's range where it is evergreen). Because the leaves are small and they decompose quickly, they do not need to be raked. It is one of two native Texas elms that flower and set seed in the fall.

Cedar Elm is the most widespread native elm in Texas. Growing in all areas of the eastern half of Texas, it can not be found natively in the extreme southeastern part. It usually is found on moist, limestone soils along water courses such as in flat river bottom areas (cedar elm flats') and wooded areas near riverbanks. But it also grows on dry limestone hills; however, the tree is small and scrubby in this environment. It grows in dense, poorly drained clay soils (vertisols) in central Texas. It is adaptable to various soils; but prefers moist to dry alkaline soils. It can be seen growing in sandy, sandy loam, medium loam, clay loam, clay, caliche type soils. Cedar elm can thrive in heavy, poorly drained clay soils and soils that are moderately compacted. .

Native distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=ULCR

Its twigs are pubescent and reddish brown. The brown to reddish, but more often gray, bark has ridges flattened and broken into thin, loose scales and only forms on mature trunks, limbs and branches after a minimum of 5 yrs. The oblique based leaves are small, 2.5 - 5 cm long and 1.3 - 2 cm wide.

The reddish-purple flowers are so small that they are inconspicuous. They are produced in fascicles of three to five on slender, pubescent pedicels located in the axils of the leaves. The red-to-green, hairy calyx is divided into four to eight equal and acute lobes. The stamen is composed of five or six slender filaments and reddish purple anthers. The green, 6 to 13 mm (0.25 to 0.5 in) long, pubescent fruit (samara) is oblong and flattened, with a deep notch at the apex. They mature quickly in the fall. The seed within samura are acute, unsymmetrical and covered with a dark chestnut brown coat. The seeds are disseminated by wind with germination occuring the following spring. Air-dried seeds may be stored at 4° C (39° F) for at least I year. Stratification at 5° C (41° F) for 60 to 90 days before sowing may increase germination rates. Because they are fall-ripening, plant after winter storage and stratification.

The seeds are part of the diet of several bird species. In south Texas, including chachalaca, pheasants, quail, songbirds and wild turkey. Dead cedar elms provide nesting sites for cavity-dwelling birds. It provides cover for wildlife and squirrels and deer eat the buds as well as the seeds. In addition, other small mammals eat the seeds. It is a larval host for the Mourning Cloak butterfly, Question Mark butterfly.

The wood is very strong and has good shock resistance so the lumber is mixed with other southern elm species and sold as r"ock elm". Rock elm is Ulmus thomasii; but, cedar elm goes by this name as well. Their specific gravity and shrinkage are quite similar. Furniture and fence posts are made from it. Because it is well suited to steam bending, it is used to make containers such as barrels, baskets, boxes and crates to name a few. Caskets and dairy, poultry, and apiary supplies are other products made from the wood.

For more informatio, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/82851/index.html

The small leaves which are somwhat rough ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Cedar Elm, Olmo, Basket Elm, Scrub Elm, Lime Elm, Texas Elm, Southern Rock Elm (Ulmus crassifolia)

The fruit ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Cedar Elm, Olmo, Basket Elm, Scrub Elm, Lime Elm, Texas Elm, Southern Rock Elm (Ulmus crassifolia)

The bark ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Orchid Tree, Red Bauhinia, Nasturtium Bauhinia, African Plume, Pride of De Kaap (Bauhinia galpinii), Caesalpiniaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen to deciduous, large vine-likreshrub, small tree, blooms mid-summer through mid-fall

This tree with a vine-like growth habit is real traffic stopper in late summer and fall when it produces beautiful blooms which are a reddish-orange color that is defficult to describe. It can easily be trained into an attractive small tree or large shrub. In its native habitat (South Africa), the long fbranches are frequently used by the local people for weaving baskets and for the construction of roof trusses for their huts. Although, I have read it will not live in Zone 8b, I found one growing near downtoen San Antonio. I have stopped many times this fall to see the beautiful blooms. Until it is about 3 years old, it must be protected from freezes. It is not suitable for a small garden. Prune in early spring.

The flowers ...

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Orchid Tree, Red Bauhinia, Nasturtium Bauhinia, African Plume, Pride of De Kaap (Bauhinia galpinii)

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/58957/index.html

Shown as the setting sun lights up the area beneath its spreading canopy (Posts are supporting a palm tree) ....

San Antonio, TX

Sand-Paper Tree, Anacua, Knock-Away Tree
Ehretia anacua Boraginaceae (Borage family)

Anacua is an ornamental native tree found in south Texas, north to Travis County, and in Mexico. It is hardy to 10 degrees F. It is well adapted to Houston, and can be grown as far north as Dallas but will suffer from die back in hard winters. Anacua most often grows in calcareous soil but will thrive in arid, sandy soil. Very drought tolerant and generally not subject to disease.

Anacua can be up to 50 feet or more, but more often a moderate sized tree of 15-40 feet, often multi-trunked or with suckers clustering around the main stocky trunk. Mature trees have an interesting, gnarled, and stocky appearance with a dense, rounded crown. Anacua forms dense thickets in its natural habitat of alluvial woods, which is where I found it. Their extensive root system provides erosion control on stream beds and hillsides. Anacua’s moderate size works well for small front and side yards, and commercial plantings with limited space. Its only disadvantage is that the abundant berries can cause messy litter on walks, drives, and patios.

Thick furrowed bark separates into thin gray or reddish scales. Dark green oval-shaped pinnate, somewhat toothed leaves have a sandpapery feel. Provides heavy shade year around, with old leaf drop occurring in the Spring. Grass does not typically grow underneath them, but found many species of wildflowers growing underneath them in the woods

Anacua has two main flowering periods: April/May and again August/ September. Fragrant star flowers are held in large showy white clusters at the ends of branches. Ripened fruit of orange-red drupes, ¼-1/4 inches wide, appear about six weeks later, and are quite showy against the contrasting dark foliage. Birds are very fond of the fruit, which is edible to humans as well.

http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/68610/index.html
http://wildflower.utexas.edu/gallery/species.php?id_plant=EHAN

The flowers do not last long on the trees and as you can see I actually missed the flowers this year. I am hoping for another short burst with that last rain. You can also see some of the branches have been burned back by that three day run of real cold weather we had here in the hill country.

San Antonio, TX

Sand-Paper Tree, Anacua, Knock-Away Tree
Ehretia anacua Boraginaceae (Borage family)

The many trunks of a young Anacua tree.

This message was edited Apr 26, 2007 1:18 PM

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

I love the Anacua tree, but I am afraid it would be too risky here.
Thank you for posting Kaye, it is nice to see more native plant lovers on the Texas forum.
Josephine.

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Escarpment Black Cherry, Prunus serotina var. eximia is found in the Edwards Plateau and can grow up to 45 to 50 feet. It's often found along creeks or other occasionally moist areas. The leaves turn yellow in the fall.It flowers in mid-spring, with long clusters of white flowers hanging from branches and small berries are later found to attract wildlife. It's a host plant for certain butterfly species. In the hilly dry-creek area I live in, it's fairly common. I suspect the wildlife in the area help spread the seeds.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Oh Linda, I would love to have one of those, maybe you can gather me up a seedling for the next R.U. Please?
Josephine.

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Of course, I could pot one up. Goodness, there's enough of those little ones around here! Here's another shot of one.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Kaye, thanks for the photo of the knock-away tree. I had never seen one before. It is great that it has 2 blooming seasons.

Linda, I had seen an escarpment black cherry blooming last year and didn't know what it was. Thanks for the photo.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

Oh Linda, you are such a sweetheart, how could I ever repay you.
Josephine.

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Carolina Buckthorn, Rhamnus caroliniana is a large shrub or small tree to 30 feet tall. Its habitat is often moist woods, bottomlands and along streams. It can also grow in drier areas, such as in the Hill Country. It has small, light green flowers in the late springtime or early summer. The berries vary, earlier on green, then may turn pink or reddish, or just turn dark and black. The berries aren't edible to humans, although some birds eat them.

NE Medina Co., TX(Zone 8a)

Here it is blooming. I've been having trouble with my provider, I think, so very hard to get pics posted.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca), Solanaceae Family, naturalized, evergreen, blooms mid-March through November (warm climates, all year), all parts are poisonous

County distribution:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/county?state_name=Texas&statefips=48&symbol=NIGL

Tree tobacco is small, evergreen tree or shrub with a loose-branching habit. It grows between 6 and 25 feet tall; however, it is usually between 6 and 15 feet tall. The opposite, smooth, large lance-shaped leaves appear on short stalks and clasp the stems. The thickish, oblong, silvery blue-green, rubbery leaves are opposite each other low on the branches. Lacking stalks, the upper leaves lie in an upward angle against the branches. They become smaller as they near the end of the branches near the flowering portion. The bark has a waxy coating.

Tree tobacco usually blooms from mid-March through November; however, in warm climates it will bloom all year. The up to 2-inch (5 cm) long, tubular flowers are loosely clustered at the branch tips. The flowers attract hummingbirds and are pollinated by butterflies and moths.

Nicotiana glauca is propagated by cuttings or by seed. Seed should be surface-sown because they need light to germinate. They can be sown in the spring; however, for an earlier and, thus, longer bloom time, start the seeds about 8 to10 weeks before the usual last frost date.

Tree tobacco contains the toxic alkaloid anabasine and all parts of the evergreen plant are toxic year-round. In Texas, cattle and horses are most frequently poisoned. Tree tobacco has been publicized as a safe, hallucinogenic plant on some internet websites; however, smoking and/or ingesting the plant has lead to death. The use of Nicotiana glauca derivatives is being studied as a possible treatment for nicotine addiction because it does not contain nicotine.

For more information, see its entry in the PlantFiles:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51448/

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) blooms ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Bloom cluster ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Bloom buds and immature fruit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Blooms and leaves ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Seed capsules ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Seedlings ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Tree Tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Habit ... Photo courtesy of Forest and Kim Starr.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

Catclaw Acacia (Acacia roemeriana)
For more information see entry in PlantFiles
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55643/

This message was edited Jul 16, 2017 8:55 AM

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