English Names for Japanese Morning Glories

Lincoln, NE(Zone 5b)

As I'm starting to do more trading for the Japanese Morning Glories, I am getting interested in finding out what the names mean in English. I've heard that Ukiqumo means "Floating Cloud". Do anyone know the meaning of any of the ones below?

Yuguruma
Heian No Akatsuki
Asuka
Fiji No Momo
Dainagon
Akatsuki no Murasaki
Fujishibori
Yojro Yagauma
Akathuyki
Henka Asugao
Heian no umi

Also I know the English name for the Silk ones, but not the Japanese. Anyone know?

I think it would be nice to have a thread with the Japanese and English names listed along with the color of the blooms and the bloom size of the Japanese morning glories we all have. Maybe with a sticky to keep it near the top of the forum. I will edit this message when I get time and add the colors and sizes of the ones I know.

Susan

Calvert County, MD(Zone 7a)

Fujishibori .... ---- striped
Henka asagao .... Mutant morning glory (literally "Mutant morning face")
Umi means 'plum' (I think) but I don't know "heian no"

Corredt me if I'm wrong

-Zem

Gamleby, Sweden(Zone 7a)

Made some google and "Heian" means peace.
Janett

Franklin, WI(Zone 5a)

Yuguruma Ornamental Windmill
Heian No Akatsuki Dawn of the Heian Era
Fiji No Momo Peach of Mt. Fuji
Dainagon An Ancient name for Earl
Heian no umi The Ocean of the Heian Era

Sandy

Franklin, WI(Zone 5a)

Here's more....

Asuka An Ancient city name located in Nara
Akatsuki no Murasaki Purple at dawn
Fujishibori "Fuji" means a wisteria or the color mauve & "Shibori" means tye=dyed


Sandy

Jacksonville, TX(Zone 8a)

This is great -
Let's keep this Thread going as we learn the translations.
I've been wanting to start a list myself.

Here are a few that I had saved [and may be duplicating some of Sandy's]. I have some more that I may get to look up tonight. Still trying to get things done around here so I can leave for Houston in the morning.

Emma


Akatsuki no Yuki (the snow at dawn)
Akatsuki no Beni (deep red at dawn)
Akatsuki no Haru (the spring at dawn)
Akatsuki no Mai (the dance at dawn)
Akatsuki no Umi (the ocean at dawn)
Akatsuki no Murasaki (purple at dawn)
Akatsuki no Yume (the dream at dawn)
Akatsuki no Kongo (Dawn series Mix)
Hama no Kagayaki (Brilliance of Beach)
Hama no Sora (Sky of Beach)
HEIAN NO AKATSUKI (dawn of the Heian era)
HEIAN NO KAORI (scent of the Heian era)
HEIAN NO HARU (the spring of the Heian era)
HEIAN NO YOSOOI (the dress of the Heian era)
HEIAN NO BENI (the deep red of the Heian era)
HEIAN NO IZUMI (the fountain of the Heian era)
Heian no Umi (the ocean of the Heian era)
HANAFUBUKI (flower shower)
KEIRYU (a mountain stream)
MATSUKAZE (the wind in the pines)
FUJIMUSUME (a wisteria girl)
KOUKAN (a red crown)
Haru no Hikari (Spring Light)
Seiun (Clear Sky)
DAINAGON (an ancient name for "Earl")
ISOCHIDORI (a plover on the beach)
MURASAKISHIKIBU (a name of a famous woman writer in the Heian era)
SAZANAMI (ripples)
EHIGASA (picturesque parasol)
Shiborizaki Kongo (Tie]dyed Mix)
Beni Chidori (Small Red Birds)
YUUGAO - moonflowers, bloom from dusk till dawn

Calvert County, MD(Zone 7a)

From this we can kinda learn individual words :)

Akatsuki - dawn
Asa - morning
Beni - red
Ginga - galaxy
Gao - face
Gumo/Kumo - cloud
Giri/Kiri - mist
Hama - beach
Haru - spring
Heian - era of Japanese history
Hikari - light
Izumi - fountain
Kagayaki - brilliance
Kongo - mix
Mai - dance
Murasaki - purple
Nishiki - brocade
No - of/at
Sora - sky
Tsuyu - dew
Umi - ocean
Yuki - snow
Yume - dream
Yosooi - dress

Other Japanese words (from other MG names)

Maru - Brown
Momo - peach
Rabenda - lavender
Raiko - lightning
Shimo - frost
Sugata - figure

Gamleby, Sweden(Zone 7a)

Heian Era is named The Era of Heian because it was a time of peace and HEIAN means PEACE in Japanese. for example: Heian No Akatsuki
should more likely be : The Dawn of Peace or Peaceful Dawn..............
They would never name something as dull as "Dawn of the Heian Era".
The Japanese culture is very symbolic and they always have a meaning/purpose when they name something. they would never put a name to something that they have put so much work and thought and love and care for just with a name that (sounds) good or in remembrance of something if that "name" didn't have a "meaning" in itself.
If you don't believe me in this look at this link on what HEIAN really means.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heian_Period
Janett
edit: spelling

This message was edited Nov 13, 2005 1:54 AM

Lincoln, NE(Zone 5b)

A few other words I think I've found the meaning of are:

Tairin=large flowered
Yuugao=Moonflower
Kikyouzaki=platycodon flowered
Kaori=scent

Susan

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Okay...,Everbody get their links on here for the online Japanese/English translators and dictionaries...and let's here from some people who are fluent in both Japanese and English...
It's a Good Start(!)...

Lincoln, NE(Zone 5b)

Ki=yellow
Kiba=yellow leaf
Ao=green
Aoba=green leaf
semiba=cicada leaf
Kise=abbreviation for yellow spotted cicada leaf
afuse=abbreviation for green spotted cicada leaf
tonboda=dragonfly leaves, side lobes are smaller than main lobe
tatula= maple like leaves
sasa=bamboo like leaves
yanagi=willow like leaves
kikyou=bell flower or star
daizaki=cup flower or crepe
botan=double flower or duplicate
maruba=round leaf

Manor, TX

I may be able to add a few things to this thread.

In Japanese garden terms, nishiki refers to leaf variegation, describing "brocaded" leaves. It's a very common term for variegated Japanese maples.

I believe aka is red in the sense of crimson or scarlet, while beni is a shade of pink. In fact, akatsuki technically means red moon, which you'd see if it sets in the west while the sun rises in the east, or during a lunar eclipse around sunrise, which sometimes happens. So that's where the meaning of "dawn" comes from, but a particularly special kind of dawn.

Murasaki Shibiku was a noblewoman in the Heian court and the author of Tale of Genji.

Yosooi means clothes or robes, unless you're referring to a warrior, in which case it can mean armor.

"No" means "of" for the word before it and also works like apostrophe "s", as well as a way to make an adjective. So, for example, Heian no Umi can mean a range of things, including Heian Sea and Peaceful Ocean, and in fact having more than one meaning is something the Japanese find clever and enjoyable. They like puns, too. Double, triple, and even quadruple meanings show up these days in product brand names, but the taste for such things goes way back. Heian Japan was 794-1185 A.D. The morning glory is thought to have been brought over from China around the beginning of that era, but the huge number of hybrids and mutations we now enjoy date back mostly to the Edo period, 1603-1868, when gardening became a popular pursuit and plant breeders were busy meeting the new market demand. The "Heian" names they gave to the new varieties were references to a romantic and golden time in history. Think of the way the word "ancient" is used to sell things in Western culture.

I'm a great fan of language and the history of gardening, so I like to read about such things. Hope this helps keep the discussion going.

Jacksonville, TX(Zone 8a)

marklongly -
Thank you so very much for sharing this great information.

Emma

Gamleby, Sweden(Zone 7a)

marklongley, You are welcome any time to give a history lesson on top of the name explanation. Personally i love to learn the history behind things, as drdon made in another tread that the ancient south and middle American Indians made a liquor from one morning glory.
Janett

This message was edited Nov 27, 2005 9:22 PM

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Thanks for the clarifications(!) Marklongley...I'm wondering about the Romanji term "Ao"...I see it used to describe blue flowers,although lincolnitess mentions it as referring to green...Can you shed any light on the term "Ao' being used to describe flowers that are blue(?)...
When a flower is described using the older Kanji,can that imply 'interpretations' that may not be apparent when rendered into Romanji(?)...
Thanks(!)...

Lincoln, NE(Zone 5b)

Ron, I will have to try to find the link that used Aoba as being green leaf. I did find a list of names for colors in Japanese and it does use ao for blue as you said and midori for green. It is interesting that this link says the Japanese have adopted 80% of our names for colors.

http://www.polykarbon.com/japan/colors/index.htm

But this link seems to use ao in many of the words translated green such as ao mugi (green Barley), aota (green paddy) and aosudare (green bamboo). I wonder if ao and Midori refer to different shades of green with ao being a blue green?

http://renku.home.att.net/500ESWd.html#SPRING--PLANTS

Susan


This message was edited Nov 28, 2005 2:31 AM

Lincoln, NE(Zone 5b)

With a little more searching, I think I found the answer to is it blue or is it green, or at least as close to an answer as there seems to be.

http://cc.msnscache.com/cache.aspx?q=2714785427875&lang=en-US&mkt=en-US&FORM=CVRE9

Susan

Shepherd, TX(Zone 8b)

I've bid on some seeds with the name "Ao Buruto". Given that 'ao' means blue, what does 'buruto' mean? I've found a few possible definitions, but nothing that makes any sense to me.

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Hi Stacey,

The only words that I could locate containing the letters buruto are the following

burutore: blue train (abbr), sleeping train
te-buruto-ku: table talk


Anybody else(?)...

TTY,...

Ron

Robertsdale, AL(Zone 8b)

I found much the same....

buru- /blue/
buru-ba-do /Blue Bird/
buru-bakkusu /blue backs/
buru-beri- /blueberry/
buru-bo-i /blue boy/homosexual/
buru-bukku /blue book/
buru-burakku /blue-black/
buru-chippu /blue chip/
buru-de- /blue day/
buru-firumu /blue film/
buru-gurasu /blueglass/
buru-inparusu /Blue Impulse/
buru-kara- /blue-collar worker/
buru-ma- /bloomers/
buru-mande- /blue monday/
buru-ribon /Blue Ribbon (Prize)/
buru-sekkasu /blue sex/homosexual/
buru-su /blues/
buru-tore-n /blue train/sleeping train (from the original color of the trains)/


Arlan

Shepherd, TX(Zone 8b)

I found a reference to 'buruto' being 'blood' in an Anime language called Lolilang, then another as the Chinese, Japanese, and Koren equilavent to the Roman god Pluto (literally translated as 'death star king'). I guess I should contact the seller and get her take on it.

Shepherd, TX(Zone 8b)

I emailed her, and she said that it was in reference to an old demon folk tale. Maybe what I found in reference to the 'death star king' is it? Anyone have a clue what this folk tale is?

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

I find it interesting that the last 3 letters 'uto' are the same in Pluto and Bar-uto...death star could be a 'dark star'...and Pluto as god of the dark underworld...just some observations...
translation key ala WWII lollapalooza and raraparuza(?!)...

blue = buru
blueberry = buru-beri
blue-black = buru-burakku
blue film = buru-firumu
blueglass = buru-gurasu
Blue Impulse = buru-inparusu
blue-collar = buru-kara
bloomers = buru-ma

Pluto ?= Bar-uto

You never know...(!)...

There is also an animated series in Japan known as asagao that has something to do with godlike beings...

TTY,...

Ron



This message was edited Dec 30, 2006 3:29 AM

Shepherd, TX(Zone 8b)

Any time I've found the word 'buru', it's been followed by another. Google keeps defaulting to "buru to", if that means anything.

Anyway, I won the auction...http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ih=011&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWN%3AIT&viewitem=&item=320065494093&rd=1&rd=1#ebayphotohosting

This message was edited Dec 30, 2006 8:29 AM

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

I will confess I get a headache from trying to say the names on my new seed packs. I poured me some coffee to help me and now I believe (after reading this) that there is hope for me in the future. :)

And I must say what a great thread. I`m going back to read it again and want to thank everyone for taking the time to write!

This message was edited Dec 30, 2006 11:55 AM

Bloomingdale, OH(Zone 6a)

My Dh heard me talking on the phone with Woofens about some of these names, and he kept saying "Bless You" and "Gesundheit!"

He thinks he is funny, lol.

mg

Shepherd, TX(Zone 8b)

I haven't seen Jan here in ages...I guess I need to catch up with her!

Shepherd, TX(Zone 8b)

An interesting tidbit that I came across that might be of some help interpreting names:

"Shibori is the Japanese word for a process of dyeing fabric that involves stitching, gathering, scrunching and tightly tieing the undyed fabric before immersing the fabric in a dye bath. There are over two hundred recognized shibori tie dyeing patterns, some achieved by twisting fabric and stitching with thread; some from wrapping the fabric tightly around a pole or rope after scrunching the fabric into a closely gathered bunch."

I found that 'sibori' is an alternate spelling, so either is correct, in case anyone may have an issue with proper spelling of the names.

Stacey

Wilmington, DE(Zone 7a)

I just looked at a photo of 'Rosita' JMG, and to my eyes the flower looks like Yagaruma. Maybe the leaf shape is different. I wonder who named Rosita, it isn't a "typical" JMG name.

Joseph

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Gerris2 - ditto...

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

It wasn`t me. :)

It is seedman.com

http://seedman.com/mglory.htm

4th one down on the morning glory page is Rosita. The picture looks like a chocolate and a star patterned.

I posted the results from buying these seeds on here last year as Rosita because the discription sounded close to reality,I didn`t know any better at the time and quickly Ron corrected me. So after learning the right term for this lovely little flower I went and fixed it.

The discription on the site is red with white star and picotee edge ...the picture is wrong. I purchased and grew these out three times and they are indeed yagarumas. I wrote and told them to please change the picture and even offered them my picture of the actual product they sent me but I suspect they don`t believe me.

This message was edited Jan 6, 2007 1:01 PM

Thumbnail by gardener2005
Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

Check this out where I corrected the missinformation. I have to say missinformation on the internet helped take some of the fun out of my summer projects.

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/622476/

BTW, the "replacement packs" were you guessed it yagarumas... lovely. the picture makes you imagine big chocolate and large flowered star patterns so it is missleading.



This message was edited Jan 6, 2007 1:18 PM

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

Here is another place where the Rosita name was confusing.I think Emma must have bought some of these from Seedman.com as well just as I did. The picture looks the same as the one on Seedman.com. Ron noted that her leaves looked like Chachamaru leaves and the flowers came out like yagarumas...not Rositas.

What are Rositas?

http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/606162/



Shepherd, TX(Zone 8b)

I think I started seeing 'Rosita' about two years ago...and I think it was Ron that pointed it out to me...?

Wilmington, DE(Zone 7a)

I saw Rosita on the Swallowtail seeds web site, which precipitated my comment.

northeast, IL(Zone 5a)

It's also listed in the Select Seeds catalog. http://www.selectseeds.com/cgi-bin/htmlos.cgi/02140.4.4958615639413682119/2007/html/productdetail.htm?

Deb

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

The Ipomoea nil 'Rosita' offered by Seedsman shown here
http://seedman.com/image/2492.jpg
looks like a rosey-pink rayed type with no specific japanese name that I recall offhand...it is pictured along with what looks like one of the chocolate or rose types

The smaller reddish yourjiro known in japan as Yaguruma
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/107750/index.html
has also been marketed as 'Red Star' by Thompson & Morgan
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/57867/index.html

relatively recently this Ipomoea hybrid has been marketed in Europe as 'Rosita'...

So,'Rosita' is a western marketing name for Yaguruma and also perhaps inconsistently applied to a larger flowered Ipomoea nil as depicted by the Seedsman portrayal...

TTY,...

Ron

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

The Seedman.com description for Rosita is this: New! Ipomoea nil, Red with white star and white picotee edge, striking.

Well, the description is more like the actual product but the description does not match the picture. If you don`t make that distinction right away then you could be in for a surprise. After growing packets in carefully marked pots with new store bought dirt I can confirm the product they sell presently as of this past year is the Western termed Rosita which is a yaguruma youjiro in Japan. I`m still working on practicing and getting the spelling right for these words. I liked the flower so it is not a big deal.

I have had a very good experience with many of their other seeds and will continue to buy from them. It would be nice if they changed the picture to match the description and product. I have no problem with the name but I do have trouble with pictures not looking like what you get.

That is why I plan doing test growing of my seeds both hand pollinated and open pollinated and taking pictures of actual results of samples of anything I might want to offer. A picture is worth a thousand words.



This message was edited Feb 6, 2007 1:14 PM

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

I noticed this entry in the PlantFiles and although the criteria required by the administators to disprove the validity of an entry may not always be able to be met by an error report...those of us here in The Morning Glory forum know a spurious entry when it is clear to us...

Rosita now entered as an Ipomoea tricolor cultivar
http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/151902/index.html

I would be GREAT(!) if along with the new innovations that are taking place on the site if we could all finally actually see who made the initial entries in the PlantFiles...that would enable the entire community to be aware of who is making all entries...

Many entries were made long ago before any comments on the photos were enabled and these old photos remain...>forever(?)...and then there are the 'hit and run' entries made by people who sign up for 30 seconds...just long enough to make an entry and then you are unable to contact them again...

This posting is not a substitute for an error report not an 'attack' on the people trying to run this site,but is is problematic and so I am simply gathering some feedback from the people on the MG forum...I'm still under the impression that gathering feedback from the community is something that is allowed and in order therefore >I am asking...

What do all of the rest of you think about this situation...I'm curious...

TTY,...

Ron

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