Ideas needed for lawn repair.

New York, NY(Zone 4a)

Hello -
I have a property in the Northern Catskills that needs to have septic repair. The problem is that the septic is in the front lawn and I hate the thoughts of looking at a huge patch of bare and ugly soil for the upcoming spring season. Does anyone have any ideas how to deal with the aftermath of the construction area so it doesn't look like an open wound all spring?

Southern, CT(Zone 6a)

Is installing sod out of the question?

Brockton, MA(Zone 6a)

If you decide on seed, get some "Contractors" mix at a good local garden center.
That will be formulated for your area.
Better than that gagged stuff from the big box stores.
Andy P

New York, NY(Zone 4a)

Sod is not an option - I was trying to find something that might act as an atractive mulch cover while the seed was growing. Someone told me that there is a tinted green sawdust mulch that can be spread on top of the seeds and that it doesn't look too bad - but the garden store has no idea what product that is.

Southern, CT(Zone 6a)

I've seen a lawn seed patch-up mix that comes with its own green mulch. Not a very natural green as I remember. I think it was by Scott's.

Long Island, NY(Zone 6b)

yes - Scott's puts one out. I bet Home Depot carries it - I've also seen other versions of that patch. It actually works pretty well and quickly!

New York, NY(Zone 4a)

Thanks! -Scotts does have it.

North Branford, CT(Zone 6b)

I have a similar problem. My front yard is in the process of being dug today for a new septic system. The area had about 30 trees that were removed with ivy groundcover. All of it is gone. I have planned a few perennial beds with grass paths throughout. I know that spring is not the best time to plant grass seed, but this is the situation. Any tips anyone can give to get the grass paths seeded and growing? I do not plan to sod.

Long Island, NY(Zone 6b)

You actually got me up and out of my house this morning - I've read in several places that the best time to plant seed is right before it snows! I went, yes I know it's 7am, and emptied my bag of seed from the shed all over my lawn. This will now be the test! Of course, now I find this..

Planting over snow. Cool season grasses (Perennial Ryegrasses, Fescues, Bluegrasses) can be successfully planted on top of snow for winter planting. What happens is that the seeds are carried downward to soil level by melting snow in the spring. At that times cracks are present in the soil from the freezing temps of winter that the seeds can be "melted" into. This provides for reasonable seed / soil contact. The disadvantages are the same as for planting out of season above... a higher risk that this method may have some failures.

Oh well, who knows, maybe I'll get lucky.

Brockton, MA(Zone 6a)

What I do for small patches is to mix the seed with some soil and put down a one inch layer on the spots. Water it in.
I do this every spring to correct the dead spots caused by the dog.
Works for me.
Andy P

Collegeville, PA

Geez, Anita, now you tell us! :) I never would have guessed you could plant over snow. I know the fall is the best time, but that was one project I just didn't finish. I am all set to overseed my lawn this weekend with seed I bought from Gardens Alive! I was considering doing it in Jan/Feb after a big snow melt, but didn't think the seed would keep. My DH told me to go ahead, the contractors of new developments do it all the time, just covering it up with straw, but, of course I didn't listen to him. Sorry, Northstarbear, I don't have any new suggestions for you.

Kimberly

Long Island, NY(Zone 6b)

sorry Kim - I'll let you know if it worked.

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