Starting Indoors...

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

OK...this is my first year starting MGs. I've been very lucky in my trades, plus many kind people have given me seeds. So, I want to make sure I get my babies off to a good start LOL. I'd thought about using Jiffy pot or pellets but have recently read about people having problems with them. Any and all suggestions are much welcomed. Plus, I was thinking about starting them very soon...is it too soon here in Ohio? Has anyine used hydrogen peroxide in sprouting/growing MGs?

Denise

New York, NY

Wasn't intending to start morning glories, but volunteers came up in a pot of a passiflora I was given. Potted two up separately, and the first one just started blooming inside today, a nice iridescent purplish Japanese MG. The seeds must have been in the soil. These just appeared under a 600W HSP lamp. but the pot was shaded by other plants.

Always water my plants with a little hydrogen peroxide in the water, and I really do believe it helps both germinating seeds and growing plants

Here's some interesting info on hydrogen peroxide from the Sleepy Oaks website:


"Sometimes I add a cup of common drug-store hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to a gallon of water, if the plant receiving it is in a situation where it should have more light. This usually happens when there is a hard freeze warning and the plants all come inside. When a plant is in a dark place, it is likely to absorb oxygen to sustain itself. The extra oxygen molecules in the hydrogen peroxide give the plants this extra little boost. Don't overdo it. Another thing I have found H2O2 to be good for is the following:
Oxygen kills fungus. If there is the suspicion that there may be a fungal problem in the soil, try watering with the same 1 cup to a gallon of water solution.
Oxygen encourages rooting: Try the same solution for putting a "difficult to root" cutting to soak in for up to 3 days before potting it as you normally would. I have had very good results with this for rooting conifer cuttings.
Try the same solution with the addition of 1/4th cup bleach per gallon of water for a soak for seeds to be planted the next day. The oxygen makes the first root shoot out of that seed big and strong, and the bleach acts as a fungicide, killing any fungal spores on the seed. Likewise, the same mixture can be used for the first watering of the seedbed. Do not do this again as the chlorine levels may build up in the seed-mix and cause death to the whole bed."

Would definitely recommend the peroxide, but can't advise on " how soon" for ypu.

Good luck in your growing.

Karen

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

Denise, as an Ohioan, I am the same way, have to plant something NOW, outside it's sometime in May when it's safe to plant so, here is your best method for our zone anyway.
You can start them by nicking them and soaking overnight, they usually don't need any hydrogen peroxie mixture to get them to sprout, they usually go to town with the nick and soak method, then just pot up in anything, BUT those little peat pots that you can dig a hole and stick pot and all in ground is the best way, only because they dont' seem to like their root system disturbed, keep them either under lights or in a southern window, they will start out slow, then really take off, I don't fertilize mine with anything like miracle gro or the like only because it boosts the growth of the vine and leaves but you dont' get many blooms, I do however use the alfalfa tea mixture to all my vines with good results.

I just started some of mine tonight, figuring they will be just about the right size for transplanting out when weather permits here, last year mine were all in pots with trellis or tomato cages and whatnot for them to climb, but this year I want to plant more in ground, as I get better results, however, I am going to plant some in pots but sink those into the ground, hoping this way will keep them moist longer and less watering for me - last year I had hundreds of pots all different variety, this year will be same and I am hoping for a little less work to keep them happy.

I hope I helped a little if not and you have more questions just ask, that's what we are all here for - good luck!

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

So, the peat pots/pellets aren't good to use? Just want to be sure LOL.

Northwest, OH(Zone 5b)

No, she said the peat pots are the best way to start them. I'm glad for this thread, because I've got several varieties I want to start inside and wasn't sure if it was a good idea.

Kylee

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Just a gentle reminder that there are different substances that are very 'generally' referred to as 'fertilizers' and that different types of fertilizers can have markedly different effects on plants at different stages of the plants growth..

It is the excess levels of the macro-nutrient(fertilizer) Nitrogen that can cause excessive vegetative growth and inhibit flowering,but the macro-nutrients(i.e.,fertilizers) such as Phosphorus and Potassium along with the micro-nutrient(fertilizers) trace minerals will not inhibit flowering...

Phosphorus fertilizer is one of the main ingredients in most bloom boosters...and alfalfa is usually rich in trace minerals due to the roots of the alfalfa plant that dive deep into the earth to absorb various trace minerals...

The Nitrogen relative bio-availability to the plants root system is yet another very important,but widely ignored aspect...a Nitrogen level (usually initially measured e.g.,as urea/ammonia/protein content ratio) that is not 'too high' to burn or inhibit the blooming,but has a high availability to the roots,can help to prevent the lower leaves of the MG plants from dying off/turning brown/becoming discolored as the plants mature...when the Nitrogen availability of the root medium is not high enough for the needs of the newer growth on the mature plants ,the plant absorbs the needed nutrients from the older leaves and these leaves then become discolored and fall off,but if the Nitrogen availability is 'just right' the older leaves will be retained and remain a nice looking green color,since the plant would not need to draw upon the nutrients contained in them to supply the newer growth...

Leaves can also become discolored and drop off due to lack of enough light,but this type of leaf discoloration is not necessarilly related to Nitrogen availability...

Do you see the lower leaves on Japanese asagao show plants missing or brown and discolored(?)...


Every person is going to(hopefully) find what works best for them, and in their local area that their plants are being grown out within...although many different local conditions can vary...


Denise - Laurrie is in Ohio and always has nice plants,so I would tend to follow her advice and not be overly concerned about the detailed soil chemistry at this point...

Enjoy(!)...

TTY,...

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

Thanks Ron, yes Ron is a walking encyclopedia of information!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! and as he said, what works well for me here may not necessarily work for someone in another zone, but since Denise was so close in my area, I thought my way would probably suit her area too.
Ron - spoke to Emma earlier today, send me that want list asap so that I can see if I have what you are looking for!!!
~Laurrie

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

Thanks for all the advice! We have Super Phosphorus that is used in other flower beds and it's good to know it will be of benefit to the MGs.

Laurrie...did you say you use peat pots, and if so, do they need to be cut down the sides/bottom before planting?

Denise

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

Denise, I use anything I can get my hands on including yogurt cups that I am trying this year with newspaper pushed down inside to form a cup, adding soil, seeds, etc. then taking the newspaper cup out of the yogurt cup and placing the little cups on a tray, anything that you can plop into ground without disturbing root system. I do not cut the peat pots, and I have also used those peat pellets that expand when you water them and pop the seeds into those, the roots aren't disturbed that way.
I have just started some this weekend and will let you know how the "newspaper cup" does for me this year.

I think you will do just fine Denise!

Northwest, OH(Zone 5b)

Just started mine this morning in peat pots after soaking overnight in hydrogen peroxide/water. This is my first time with morning glories, period. I only had a small amount of seed starter medium, so I put Miracle Gro moisture control in the bottom of the pots and about an inch of the seed starter on top of that. Hope that will work okay.

Kylee

Murfreesboro, TN(Zone 7a)

That should work fine; they are pretty forgiving. I have started mine in peat pots with straight miracle gro in the past since the dirt they eventually went into was not super fertile.

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

update: today I have germination in my newspaper cups from seed planted 3-24, so they seem to be content in their little container as of today, will see what happens later down the road.
Laurrie

Lubbock, TX(Zone 7a)

Thanks for the info folks.......I'm in the boat starting my first MG's.

Northwest, OH(Zone 5b)

OhioBreezy, they germinate that fast???? Any difference in germination rates of the Japanese MGs and the regular old blue ones?

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

Kbaumle - I am not sure, they all seem to germinate rather quickly with 2-3 days here for me regardless of which kind. When seeds are fresh they usually sprout right up and I have all my seeds from fall 2005 collections started now, so let's hope it's a wonderful year for these glories.
~Laurrie

Northwest, OH(Zone 5b)

I got all my seeds except for the Chocolate, from DGers, and I believe they were all from 2005, too, so we'll see what happens! :-)

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

Best of luck, these DGers are the best, so you got some good seeds!!!

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

Well, my moon vine and some of my MG seeds are soaking tonight to be potted tomorrow. I didn't know they germinated that fast!!! That's faster than the castor bean I'm starting and I thought that was fast for sprouting in a week. We're going to plant castor bean along our back property line and grow MGs in them. Plus, we're going to grow sunflowers on our south slope and grow MGs on them, too. And there's a few other places that will have MGs LOL! Should be interesting...there's a landlocked empty lot that's not used (city owned) behind our backyard. I picked up the trash back there the other day and have half a mind to put some flower seeds back there, too!

Denise

Murfreesboro, TN(Zone 7a)

Hmmm, if some MG seeds "happen" to fall on the other side of the fence... or the "birds" scatter some sun flower seeds back there... it can't possibly look as bad as trash, one would think... I won't tell :-)

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

OK...I have another question. After soaking seeds, is there a difference in the germination chances of floating seeds vs. the seeds that sunk. Just wonder because most of my seeds are floaters. Of course, I used a water/peroxide mix. So I don't know if that would make a difference in the amount of floaters than if it had been plain water.

Denise

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

hmm usually I dont' presoak mine, but alot of folks do, I have heard that floaters sometimes are not viable, but if they are all floating, perhaps it's the peroxide mixture, not sure, if someone sees this that uses peroxide they might be able to help you out.

I just make my soil very wet, plant the seeds and they soak the water up rather quickly and swell up really big, then within a day or 2 they usually have that first feeler root that comes out.......................

hoping someone who uses the mixture comes along with some help here for you.
L

Northwest, OH(Zone 5b)

I soaked mine in water and hydrogen peroxide, and yes, I do believe the bubbles generated by the peroxide will make the seeds float. You will see them float for awhile (while the bubbles are attached to them), then sink (when the bubbles pop). I doubt there is anything to the floaters being non-viable.

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

I'm really hoping that either A.) The peroxide is contributing to the amount of floaters, &/or B.) Floaters don't necessarily mean non-viable. But I guess there's one sure-fire way to find out...I'm potting them up tonight LOL.

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Hello,

Regarding "Floaters don't necessarily mean non-viable"

I have found that the floater method to determine seed viabilty to be unreliable, because although many seeds that hydate will usually(!) sink after taking in water,there are some healthy seeds with hard coats that may not hydrate completely or otherwise remain floating due to membrane-like air chambers built into the seeds...

Although it is true that seeds that are extremely underdeveloped,mouldy or otherwise dead will usually float,I have found many viable seeds containing air trapped inside of the seed someplace which will cause the seed(s) to float...in point of fact,many Convolvulaceae seeds are known to be labryrinth type seeds that develop air chambers to cause the seeds to float on the surface of water(s) to facillitate the wider dispersal of the seed(s) from rain,flood or other water sources...

There are many species in Convolvulaceae that are not officially classified as labryinth seeds,but sometimes a portion of a population will produce some healthy 'floaters' as an extra insurance policy to insure seed dispersal over a wider geographic area via any possible available water transport...

Additionally,some seeds that are in a deeper state of dormancy may not initially fully hydrate and a portion of these dormant seeds may continue to float,until they are ready to more fully hydrate and sprout at a later time...

TTY,...






This message was edited Mar 28, 2006 6:08 AM

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

Thanks, Ron. That's definitely good to know! I had a suspicion, when I saw the majority of my moon vine seeds floating, that they couldn't all be bad.

Denise

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

Well, I have sprouts!!! Moon vine was the first to crack the dirt, but then slowed down. Joyce Cobb was off and running fast and is going strong. A few others are sprouting as well. Now, if I can just keep them alive and healthy until they can be planted out :~)

Denise

Northwest, OH(Zone 5b)

Mine have all sprouted! (I started six different ones.) Some took a little longer than others, (Chocolate was the last, and that was probably the freshest seed), but the first ones were popping through at three days. Amazing!

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

Congrats everyone!!!! There will be glories everywhere!!

Belleville , IL(Zone 6b)

I take a moonvine seed and place it into a pliers. I put it in the deepest part, which is the middle. This usually will limit the depth the pliers can "pinch" the moonvine seed. Then I carefully apply pressure to the handle until I hear the slightest crack. then I soak the seed. Sometimes the very next day they are already growing in the water I soaked them in. The ones that do not get cracked will still be hard as a rock.

Zanesville, OH(Zone 6a)

Bad news!!! Most of my MGs started inside bit the dust :~( Luckily, I saved some Wedding Bells to start later. But all of my Joyce Cobb died! And I was looking forward to seeing it. I don't think I'll ever use peat pots again. This was my first & last time. Too messy, too much mold problems that I was fighting on a daily basis. I think I started too early. How's everyone else doing? Anyone know where to get Joyce Cobb seeds :~) ?

Denise

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

aw shucks Denise, sorry to hear that! it's hard sometimes starting indoors but it's not too long now till we can plant outside.
I have Joyce Cobb :) dmailing you!

Laurrie

Aschaffenburg, Germany

Didn't mean to revive this thread, but I am always interested in learning something new...Newspaper cups, that's double Dutch to me. Cups made of newspapers, I suppose...but how do you do that?

Thanks for any info,


Martin

Belleville , IL(Zone 6b)

Guides and information at the top of the page tabs will take you to a page where you can select Videos and watch Dave make the pots from newspaper.

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