SOLVED: Wildflowers

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

I photographed dozens of wildflowers and identified most of them, but these nine I am stumped with finding an ID for. They are all growing in the Phoenix area in zone 9b.

Here's #1a
A Cassia or Senna, I haven't found a species yet with the same leaves. It appears to be a bush type.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#1b
flower and leaves

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#2a The flower head.
This one is a Castilleja species. Notice the bracts are not elongated like in some of the Arizona native species. The leaves are still reddish though.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#2b
The leaves are still reddish though.

This message was edited Apr 15, 2006 11:50 AM

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#3a Whole plant
This one has pinkish bracts and smaller lavender colored flowers.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#3b The leaves

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#3c Flower closeup

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#4
A daisy-like flower

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#5a
The flowers of a medium-small straggly bush type of plant

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#6a
This is a Phacelia species, I didn't find a species with the same leaves.
The flower head is a couple of inches wide.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#6B the Pacelia leaves

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#7a
A blue-violet flower stalk a few feet high

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#7b
flower closeup

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#8a
A red and yellow flower. The plant is a few feet high.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#8b Flower closeup

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#9a
This plant might be considered a weed by some, but I liked the flowers.
Small blue-violet flowers and fuzzy stems and leaves.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

#9b
flower and stem close-up view.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Las Cruces, NM

#s 3 and 7 are both Salvia of some kind. #6 is looking more like Gilia capitata than a Phacelia, to me.

Patrick Alexander

Phoenix, AZ

I vote for Lobelia laxiflora for #8. sam

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

#3 looks like Salvia canariensis
#5 looks like Chilopsis linearis (desert willow)
And I agree on #8, definitely Lobelia laxiflora.
I also agree that #6 doesn't look like Phacelia but I don't know what it is (could be Gilia--I'm not familiar with those)

Beautiful, BC(Zone 8b)

I did a little looking for #1 and came across this image: http://wc.pima.edu/~bfiero/tucsonecology/plants/wflow_dese.htm which looks quite close. Senna covesii (Desert Senna)

Lutz, FL(Zone 9b)

5a -Possibly an Agalinis? (aka False Foxglove)

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

I agree on #8 is Lobelia laxiflora.
#8 is SOLVED.

Re: Gilia capitata (Globe Gilia), the flowers seem very close:
http://www.timetotrack.com/jay/giliag4.htm
and so do the leaves:
http://www.meemelink.com/prints%20pages/18707.Polemoniaceae%20-%20Gilia%20capitata.htm
http://www.ivn-westerwolde.nl/paginas/plukweiden/gilia_capitata.jpg
http://www.ee.e-mansion.com/~folium/uchinoko/gilia-c.html
This link says it's adaptable to arid regions
http://www.wildflowerinformation.org/Wildflower.asp?ID=84
I would say #6 is SOLVED.

Re: #3...Salvia canariensis
Yes it looks about right to me:
http://www.thurbergulch.com/salvia_canariensis.html
The leaves look about the same too:
http://members.fortunecity.de/benno8/teneriffa01/dsc01014.jpg
http://www.kconline.com/tg/uraniwa/S.canariensis.html
I would say #3 is SOLVED.

Re: #7 being a Salvia....I'm searching through Salvia's right now.

Re: #5 being Chilopsis linearis, that was my first thought until I compared it to my other photos in the PF,
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/50821/
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/50827/
the leaves are close but the #5 flower has spots.
As for #5 being False Foxglove, The images I seen on a google search showed False Foxglove's petals as being more evenly shaped, also smaller than mine, didn't see any spots. The stems also seemed to be thinner and the overall plant smaller.
The whole plant of #5 is like a medium bush (unless it's a small tree).

Re:#1 being Senna covesii, well that was one of my first comparisons, which was sort of convenient because there was an 'actual' verified Senna covesii growing a few yards away from #1 mystery Senna. Senna covesii overall plant and the leaves don't get as big as big as #1 (where they are currently growing)

Re: Responses from this thread
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/588397/
I am searching for Eremophilas for #5

Re: #9 being Desert Lavender (Hyptis emoryi)
That was my first inclining until I compared the flowers to a verified H. emoryi (pictured below)
The leaves on H. emoryi are very large compared to #9.
Here are the flowers & leaves of Desert Lavender:

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

I think I've found #7.... Blue Sage (Salvia farinacea)
http://www.depts.ttu.edu/hillcountry/research/wildflowers.htm

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Take a look at this pic from MSWN- http://www.mswn.com/images/Eremophila_x_Summer_Time_Blue-7.jpg

It kind of depends on where you take the picture, too - is this your neighborhood, an empty lot or the middle of the desert? I doubt you'd find an Emu bush - especially a hybrid - out in the middle of the Sonoran Desert, LOL!

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

Pagancat,
Some of these are in my neighborhood in the middle of the city, and some are in the Desert Botanical Garden. It looks like you've nailed #5 (Growing at the Desert Botanical)
Eremophila polyclada x divaricata 'Summertime Blue'
http://www.mswn.com/Eremophilla.htm
Number #5, I would say is SOLVED.

That only leaves #1, #2, #4, & #9 to go

Thanks to everyone for helping, so far.

edit addition:
but then again it also looks close to E. divaricata on these links
http://www.australianplants.com/images/eremophila.divaricata2.jpg
http://www.mswn.com/images/Eremophila_divaricata-1.jpg

This message was edited Apr 4, 2006 3:29 PM

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

What is #9's height?

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

I'm fairly certain that #1 is Senna covesii .... I wonder if it tends to look a little different just because it's gotten more water and little more shade than usual? The flower is also incurved rather than recurved (are those both words,LOL?)

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

Re: #9's height is about 1-2 feet, the branches are 3-4 feet long, semi-prostrate.

Re: #1... if I could only show you in real life, the differences would be more apparent.
I photographed #1 last year when it was 2.5 feet high, it is now about 3 feet high. All the S. covesii's that are growing nearby are not over 2 feet high. The leaves of Senna covesii are more grayer and less elongated than #1.
Here's a couple of pictures of Senna covesii, the leaves, stems and overall average size are smaller.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

Senna covesii, close-up

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Okay, yeah - more spreading of a habit, slightly more elongated leaves.... shoot. I would say that it has to be a close relative - the flowers - stamens, etc. are so close.... Hmmph.

Oh, I got it.
>grin<

Maybe you've found a new plant???

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

PC,
Yes, definately a close relative, and yes, the flowers are very close on many of the Cassia's/Senna's.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

I am probably way off base, but I have been trying to locate subspecies of senna that natively grow in your locale. Not knowing what plants you have already ruled out except for Senna covesii, maybe it is woolly senna, slim pod senna .- Senna hirsuta var. glaberrima (synonyms: Cassia gooddingii, Cassia leptocarpa var. glabberrima, Ditremexa glaberrima) which has very long narrow seed pods). I copied and pasted you photo of the whole plant into my graphics program and enlarged it. I did not see any seed pods so that I could compare them.
http://www.fireflyforest.com/flowers/yellows/yellow20.html

I know that Senna hirsuta has more pointed leaves than your specimen, but I am having a difficult time locating photos of Senna hirsuta var. glaberrima leaves.

By the way, did the tiny Opuntia microdasys v. albispina I sent you last June grow well for you? If not, I'll try to obtain some larger specimens.

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

The Senna/Cassia is growing at the Desert Botanical Gardens, so it could be native to Arizona or another region entirely. Is it possible that it's a hybrid/cultivar?
I missed the seed pods, but next time I'm there, I will check for pods.
I systematically went through all the Senna's and Cassia's listed at DesertTropicals.com, and didn't see a match.

The leaves in #1 are about 2 inches long.
The leaves in these links appear to be smaller and have pointed tips.
http://www.fireflyforest.com/flowers/yellows/yellow20.html
http://www.illustratedgarden.org/mobot/rarebooks/page.asp?relation=QK98J311809&identifier=0211
http://www.bio.uu.nl/~herba/Guyana/VTGG/Fabaceae/Senna/slides/Senna%20hirsuta%202.html
http://fm1.fieldmuseum.org/vrrc/?page=view&id=23225

This link shows a bunch of different species leaves, but it could also be a Cassia instead.
http://fm1.fieldmuseum.org/vrrc/index.php?page=results&genus=Senna

The small microdasys is doing great. It turns out to be the 'albata forma' after some research.

This message was edited Apr 27, 2006 5:54 PM

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

Here's a better shot of #9's Leaves.

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

Here's a close-up pict of #9's flowers.
They are about 1 - 1.25 inches long

Thumbnail by Xenomorf
San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

I am glad that the Opuntia microdasys is doing well; but, I am sorry that it turned out to not be what you wanted. I will have to tell the man who gave it to me has it misidentified.

Las Cruces, NM

#9 is another Salvia; Salvia parryi. I came across it while mounting incoming specimens in the herbarium here at NMSU, we have one collected by T.R. Van Devender at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. Cool plant; hadn't seen it before.

On #3, my best guess would be Castilleja integra, but I don't really know Castilleja...

Patrick Alexander

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

#9 Might be in the Lamiaceae Family. It might be Parry's sage or Parry sage (Salvia parryi) from the descriptions I have found.

Ooops! While I was searching for an image of Parry's salvia, Patrick posted before I did.

This message was edited Apr 10, 2006 12:30 AM

At the link below, it is described as having light blue flowers and it ... "smells like a cat litter box ..." Oh, my! I have not been able to locate any photos. This plant is not in the PlantFiles.
http://www.diamondjk.com/ohsage.html


This message was edited Apr 10, 2006 1:03 AM

Information about this plant is scarce and I am still unable to find any image.

This message was edited Apr 10, 2006 1:39 AM
edited for typos ...I must have been sleepy ...

This message was edited Apr 11, 2006 2:56 AM

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

htop,
The O. microdasys you sent was just fine, I didn't have any of that type before, but now I do, thanks to you, I appreciate it. :)

paalexan or htop or anyone else,
Could you please quote the official description of Salvia parryi here (from a book)? I don't have S. parryi in my books. I didn't find any photos online either. Unless there's a description online somewhere?

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