SOLVED: Tree Identification with pictures

Denver, CO

Simply; What is it?

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

One large leaf divided quite well (twice-pinnate) into leaflets

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

Great new growth

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

Looks like a legume?...

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

But not those fragrant flowers.

What, oh, experts, do you call it?

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

Thanks,
Kenton

Beautiful, BC(Zone 8b)

Could that be a Kentucky Coffeetree (Gymnocladus dioicus)?

Denver, CO

You must understand that am just a Colorado hick as far as tree biodiversity and familiarity goes. (Just to say: Robinia and Albizia are unusual here. ) The proof of this fact is that I could not ID such a well-known tree!

I guess now, seeing how it is not Fabaceae (when did we go Papillionaceae?) but Caesalpiniaceae, I am less disturbed by the radial and not pea-like flowers.

I have more trees that I would like to ask about then.

A young thing planted a year or two ago on the MSC campus:
Leaves

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

Thanks, by the way, Mr. Growin of Van-Can.

Bark:

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

Next tree. Tree #3.

Odd habit attracted me first. Very dense interior.

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Kalispell, MT(Zone 4b)

Just a guess Kenton but the leaf looks like an European Hornbeam. #2

This message was edited May 11, 2006 11:43 PM

Denver, CO

Fruit.

That's it. Thanks for entertaining the questions of such a tree-inept dendrophile. I have already looked through several books and came up with nothing (Lacking any good keying-out volumes.) and I do not know where else to go.
Kenton

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Beautiful, BC(Zone 8b)

Tilia or Acer negundo. It looks familiar but I believe the first is correct. JamesCo, way-to-go!

Denver, CO

Well, hiya Steve. Still suffering the hospitalities of Alaska, mate?
I did not think that the leaves were so asymmetrical on Ostrya. Tree #2 and #3 have such asymmetry, but the latter is by far thicker and glossier. (and some serration differences) But, really, what do I know!?

Denver, CO

Clarification: I wrote "that's it" before I knew steve had posted. Fancy that. I meant that is all teh tree ID pictures...

I have to say that I, the dope, am fairly familiar with both Acer negundo (invasive in some parts here) and Tilia. Tilias here (there are a couple streets laden with them; blomoing now) have very broad leaves. I will check some internet photos, but neither seem to fit.

Illinois, IL(Zone 5b)

James, your last tree is a Celtis, but it's tough to tell which species from photos (heck, it's even tough when you're standing next to them!). Try looking up the genus and see if you can key it out from there.

Guy S.

Kalispell, MT(Zone 4b)

Well is the second tree an European Hornbeam? Yes I am suffering through one of those spectacular spring days of sun and warmth. Just a shot I just took at 6:45pm. Sun is going to keep me up tonight. 4 more hours before complete set.

Thumbnail by Soferdig
Cincinnati, OH(Zone 6b)

And you've captured an UFO to boot!

Scott

Kalispell, MT(Zone 4b)

UFO's are constant visitors up here cause they don't get harassed by all the press. The Aliens are quite happy up here they have lots of places to land without harrasment. I like aliens.

Thumbnail by Soferdig
Thornton, IL

Sofer - Give ET a big hug from me, and tell him to phone home for Mother's Day! ;-)

Kalispell, MT(Zone 4b)

I've met ET's brother UT up here but he doesn't like his brother. I guess they had a falling out with some event that ET did as a youngin. But UT is planning a solarphone call to mom.

Thornton, IL

*giggle* You're so much fun, I wish you were MY brother!

Kalispell, MT(Zone 4b)

You are we both share a joy in life that makes us family. I wish you were my sister.
Back off UT or I'll do it to you also! He keeps wanting to put his red finger on me. I don't want to be burned. Keep away Ut!

Thornton, IL

Kenton - Quick! Break open that pod and eat two seeds, it's the only antidote that can save my brother!! Take cover from the rays. Hurry, the sands of time are running dry!

Kalispell, MT(Zone 4b)

I've got to read "Dune". I read mostly non-fiction and enjoy especially the history of anything. Was the planet Dune or just the title of the book. The ferry just passed by in the sunlight. I hope to bring up my Kayak on a road trip sometime. Then I can experience the AL-Can. I met several Coasties who were going back the Al-Can. I envy them.

Illinois, IL(Zone 5b)

I hear the AlCan ain't the he-man road it used to be. Someone said it's all paved now! Takes all the thrill out of it . . . I remember the days when folks rigged up 8-foot screens across the grill to protect their cars from flying rocks, or only drove it in the winter when it was all froze up and the tiger-trap potholes were filled with ice.
Aaaarrrgghhh!

Guy S.

Denver, CO

"The planet Arachis, also known as Dune. Also known as North of GrandJunction Colorado."

I think Frank Herbert wrote 'Dune' Quite well, but hired some schmuck off of the street to write the rest. There was a nice feminist version of 'Dune' that was a good read called "Grass." You can guess...

I have other trees shose genus is obvious but species/cultivar are not, but that will have to wait until I have access to my home computer.

Missing the good ol'days, Guy?

Kenton

Scott County, KY(Zone 5b)

I see that this thread took a travel turn, and Kenton may/may not have figured out what his trees were.

#1: Gotten, Gymnocladus dioicus

#2: I really think that's a Celtis occidentalis, with the rougher leaves.

#3: Might be a Celtis laevigata, with smoother darker glossier leaves that are entire (or with much fewer teeth than Celtis occidentalis). The fruit doesn't seem right for it, though.

Google for some good Celtis pictures of additional species, like Celtis jessoensis, Celtis australis, and Celtis sinensis.

Denver, CO

Thanks, VapidVole. A local friend of mine called me about the Gymnocladus, and I had not gotten too far on species IDs for the Celtis. I have much more to go on now.
Thanks, Kenton

Kalispell, MT(Zone 4b)

Kenton was tree #3 taken in late summer with that fruit? Maybe a Styrax Japonica?

Denver, CO

Taken the day before posting. I have seeds for Styrax, I do hope they grow.

Kalispell, MT(Zone 4b)

One of my favorite trees but no can do in Montucky with Styrax. I planted a Carolina Silverbell to mimick the flower but I ran over it with the big 6 yard loader when I drove through the narrowed pass way. Bummer. Though I replaced it with a Pagoda Dogwood and Love it.

Tyrone, GA(Zone 7b)

Hi, hope you can help identify this tree -- DH and I cleared out some scrubby brush and vines between our loblolly pines and found this tree (trying) to grow. The trunk is smooth and darkish in color and the leaves are large...

Thumbnail by gliz
Tyrone, GA(Zone 7b)

here are the leaves

Thumbnail by gliz
Illinois, IL(Zone 5b)

Looks like bitternut (Carya cordiformis). If so, a magnificent tree to have among pines come fall color time!

Guy S.

Tyrone, GA(Zone 7b)

Thanks guy. The leaves do look like a bitternut hickory.

Denver, CO

Here we go again:
Ladies (if any. Lauren?) and Gentlemen, please keep your hands and feet inside of the bus at all times...

Is this Cedrus atlantica (not glauca)
or Cedrus libani?
I think it is (or want it to be) atlantica, but I don't know these things.

Other than cones (which are not available) and some small size difference in needles, what are the major morphological differences between the two? After all, C. deodara is flaming obvious, with its curved, long, near-hair-like needles.

Cedrus who

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

Closer

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

Much closer.

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea
Denver, CO

Bird-fallen-out-of-nest's eye view.

Thumbnail by ineedacupoftea

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or sign up to post.
BACK TO TOP