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Passiflora edulis & other edible passies

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Which is the most heat tolerant??

I really wanted to grow the flavicarpa up a pole in the greenhouse, but after googling found it might not be able to take our summer heat. We have several weeks of temps in the 100's, mid-summer.

Anyone have an edible passie that does well in the heat??

I also read that ligularis can't take heat...
-T

Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

For me, it's P. incarnata in the ground, and vitafolia and incense in pots.

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Those have edible fruits? ...I mean I know most passies set a fruit of some sort to set seeds, but so many aren't palatable.

Do you eat the fruit of those you mentioned, and it is comparable to the edulis?

Chandler Heights, AZ(Zone 9a)

I have 2 Passiflora Fredricks doing great in Phoenix, they did fine with temps up to 115...as long as they had some extra water.
I had a large Passiflora Alata, but that one didn't like the heat.

Kevin

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Are the fruits good? ...Do you like the taste?

Chandler Heights, AZ(Zone 9a)

The Frederick is the purple one you ususally see in the stores. I like it!

Kevin

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Kevin-
Thank you for your information. That is what I needed...a passie that can take 105-110. We only get that for about three weeks, but it is enough to kill plenty of otherwise hardy things.

Thank you for your help. Wish now that I'd picked one up when they had them at lowes this spring...
-Taylor

Chandler Heights, AZ(Zone 9a)

Good luck! I got one at Lowe's and one at Home Depot, 5 gal size. Now that it's cooled off slightly, they're really taking off.

Kevin

Springfield, MO(Zone 6a)

Passiflora incarnata green seed pods are edible (including the alba variety). The insides have a white outer layer that looks like tofu (or styrofoam), has the consistancy of tofu (or styrofoam), and tastes a lot like tofu (or styrofoam). It would be good to eat if you were starving. Perhaps other varieties are tastier.
Dave.

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks, Dave, but not interested in growing edible styrofoam, lol...

I want to grow yummy stuff, lol...
-T

ps-had hubby eat a morifolia once(kinda like that old Life cereal commercial "give it to Mikey...He'll eat it!" I handed it to him, and asked what it tasted like. His face puckered up and he said "...tastes like sour dirt!", and continued to spit it out, lol.

Did the same thing to the poor fellow, with malabar climbing spinach. He ate one raw leaf (at my request) and said "yuk!...taste like hair gel"

This message was edited Sep 19, 2006 8:53 AM

KC Metro area, MO(Zone 6a)

I'm gonna have to remember those for when I can't stand my mom's cooking!! LOL

Pinellas Park, FL(Zone 9b)

Taylor,
I have edulis and although are temps seldom get over 100 except a few days in summer, this fine takes the heat fine. It is a late bloomer here and didn't produce blooms till late August and is still blooming. The smell is heavenly. Just walk in the yard and you can smell it at leave 15 feet away. I have about 8 fruit which I'm waiting to ripen.
Jan...

Keller, TX(Zone 8a)

Hi Taylor (seedpicker_TX ), I'm pretty new to the Gardening Scene.. I'm a Brooklyn boy that moved to Texas 3 years ago and brought back some Passion Fruit seeds from Dominican Republic and dried them out and planted them about 6 months ago. Have you heard of any successes with Passion Fruit growing out here in Texas ?Their growing pretty nice but I just don't want to set myself up for disappointment.
Thanks,
John

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

John-
my original question was posted because I wanted to plant a particular passie in a very hot spot underneath a polycarbonate roof. It traps heat and gets much hotter than one grown out in fresher air.

I've grown passies for many years here in Texas, and out in the garden, they do very well. In fact, most people complain they grow TOO well. In Houston, my brother cut his down because he said it was eating his house, lol...His HOA didn't like it, either(no surprise there!)

The only complaint I have about them, is that they sucker. I had a "blue boutique" that took me several years to eradicate, because it kept popping up as far as 30 ft away...

I now plant either the annuals, or keep them in containers.
-T

Houston, TX(Zone 10a)

the incarnata fruits... taste less like styrofoam when they are ripe...there is a sweetness near the seeds... its like pomegranit style..more seed than juicey fruit..but the juicy fruit you do get is wonderful...

Passie's are considered native here and grow ..out of control .. in many areas... many of mine are considered food for different butterflies and caterpillers, I let them munch out too, that is how I keep them from taking over... also when the roots send out runners.. I take them and root them, to sell or plant in random places that need a bit more color;)

Greensburg, PA

I had P. incarnata fruit last year from two plants. The few best fruits were very aromatic and tastie, but amount of juice was trivial and out of about 100 fruits, only a couple were worth eating and that only from one of the vines. Apparently a lot of variance in this one. I started seed from a supermarket fruit that have yet to bloom but I'm hoping soon.

Sydney, Australia

Hi everyone ...You know I have been told that Americans don't like passionfruit and I now think I know why ...after talking to a few folk about the place in these forums.....I think I now know why......in Australia passionfruit eating is a passion....it is one of our great fruits.I could be wrong but it seems to me that there are two reasons that you would not love eating a passionfruit
1) because that is not the right one to eat.....eating the wrong ones
won't hurt you it just won't taste very good......we would not touch most mentioned with a ten foot pole ...not to eat anyway.
2) the growing period is too short and the fruit has not ripened enough......they should fall off and wrinkle just a little before eating.
The better you mulch and feed them the bigger and better the fruit
if the heat is severe dry weather...it is good to train into a lightly shaded tree...this provides protection....
My advice is to go buy a few nice edible ones from the fruit shop take the seeds of the ones you like the best grow them....easy just throw the pulp of a very ripe passionfruit onto the top of some potting mix in a pot...cover with just a little dirt...put in warm shade and lightly water every couple of days ...they soon pop up...as you are going into fall- you might want to overwinter the seedlings in a safe place and plant out when the warm weather returns.If you don't want to do that go to a nursery and ask for a good eating passionfruit .....(PS you don't spit the seeds out ..you swallow like oysters)...ha ha ha ...sorry but someone told me folks over there spit the seeds out. Is that true?

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Hi Chrissy-
I think you may be right all all accounts, lol...

As for the best tasting fruit, for me it has to be the edulis flavicarpa. It is a large yellow fruited passie, and has a teeny bit of tang, or tartness to it.(sorta like pineapples).

Which type are you eating that you like so much?? Do tell!

Most of the US does not have a long enough season for some of the tropical fruits (which are some of the best tasting ones, too).
I went ahead and planted the flavicarpa variety up a pole in an area that gets wrapped with greenhouse plastic during the winter, so it can continue its growing season past frost. I'm hopeful it will work out well for me this way : 0)

As for planting the pulp...I was always told the pulp contained a germination inhibitor, and that it should be removed before sowing...I usually rub the gooey seeds between paper towels, until they are cleaned off...

And, yes, I spit out the seeds...definitely.
-T

Sydney, Australia

Ha ha ha so it is true ....well no wonder you don't like them much
over that way....you eat them like you eat an oyster just swallow it all down with a happy slurp.Well I don't mind those yellow ones I guess but for me....the "Nelly Kelly and it's hybrids are the best ...the fruit is a deep purple aging to a brown crinkly look when ready to eat....there is nothing that tastes like these wonderful fruit
I don't know about seed inhibiter....you hear that about a few things but having grown hundreds in the way I mentioned I would not worry about it too much.If you pop over th the "it's beginning to look like the tropics parts 1/2/3 in the tropical forum you will see a big passionfruit debate in there.....Please try the method I have explained ......and if they still are no good it must be the shorter growing season or picking them too soon.......and please....the seeds won't hurt you ...it is part of the eating experience ...just think ! if you eat them like an oyster... people will think you are an ozzy ....:)

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Nelly Kelly??...never heard of it...

It is quite possible that you have varieties that we simply cannot get. I'll look that one up to see...
-t

Sydney, Australia

That is exactly what I mean.......I think we grow them for eating...we don't have all those pretty ones...only about 2 but all the good eating ones are grown here.....the very tropical ones only do well in QLD but in my humble opinion ....those really tropical ones like.. my Alata ...don't really have a great taste .....go check out what the Supermarket offers you as fruit ......do they sell crinkly purple ..brown ones? if they do grab those ones.....:)

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Nope...
They don't have any passiflora fruits at any of the supemarkets here that I've ever seen...The only way I even knew about how the flavicarpa tasted, was that a friend of mine sent me one in the mail...

Sydney, Australia

Oh that is sad :(

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

yep,...no passie fruits(unless you grow your own) and still sad that we don't have fragole grapes, either!, lol...

Sydney, Australia

Ha ha ha oh now I remember you ....well sorry we are not next door cause I would gladly give you some......:) chrissy

(Taylor) Plano, TX(Zone 8a)

Ah, thanks!...oh, well.
-T

Houston, TX(Zone 10a)

We have grocery stores here in H-town that have several 'exotic' fruits...

Sydney, Australia

Well if you can get your hands on them ...why not share them around?....just think how popular you would be :)

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