Morning Glories 2006 #8

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Here is where we were on the previous thread
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/650958/

horizontal cut of the seedpods of some Ipomoea showing how the cotyledons are folded inside...for your viewing pleasure...

TTY,...

Ron

This message was edited Oct 5, 2006 7:12 PM

Thumbnail by RON_CONVOLVULACEAE
Wilmington, DE(Zone 7a)

Nice photo, Ron, do you use a copy stand? What did you use for the background?

Bartlesville, OK(Zone 6a)

Wow, how did you do that????

Susan
=^..^=

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

That is really neat!

X

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

I was looking through my photos for something interesting to post at the beginning of the thread and I decided to post this one from my "Photos Sent" folder...I've got a 'bunch' of photos that were sent to me over the last year or so and although I usually put the persons name after the photo...this one is unmarked >which can happen when I'm trying to clear out my e-mail of photos quickly after being up for way too long and I've been in and out of consciousness hitting buttons and clicking in a semi-somnambulistic state and finally realize >that I have(!) to turn the computer off(!) >and allow myself to unequivocally go to sleep(!)...

There is no copyright on it and if anybody recognizes it as your own please let me know and I'll be glad to give you credit for it...I think this came from a person who sent me a one shot package of seeds from Australia >but not really sure...

I thouight I should share it...

TTY,...

Ron

Robertsdale, AL(Zone 8b)

Interesting picture! I think Joseph is right. Looks to me to have qualities very close to some of the dragonfly specimen pictures I see produced on a flat bed scanner. That process can produce very high resolution pictures where depth of field is not an issue.

Arlan

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

I like it. You can see it as well as if you had it in your hand.

Nature is awesome. These three flowers occured just as you see.

http://davesgarden.com/forums/fp.php?pid=2788914

I have a habit of walking through the garden each morning now and look forward to what finds will be there.

Paris, TN(Zone 6b)

Wow, cool photo you shared Ron! And what pretty ladies you have this morning gardener2005!

I have a volunteer MG that just started blooming on my grape arbor. Will have to see if I can get out on break and take a pic (it's just a plain jane) but I love the look on the arbor!

~Sunny

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

I wanted to share another picture showing interesting shapes and forms. This one shows three flowers from largest to smallest.

Thumbnail by gardener2005
Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

thanks for the compliments! Here are some cute Yagarumas and I love this picture because it looks like they are almost defying the laws of Japanese morning glory wilting in the bright hot sun. :)

This message was edited Oct 6, 2006 9:33 AM

Thumbnail by gardener2005
Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

And last of all I found a purple one. I just Have to share. :)

Thumbnail by gardener2005
Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

beautiful photos! I love this time of year when they are trying to put on their last show for me here, won't be long and they will be done, as frost will be hitting our area within weeks :(

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

It is almost like you got to hurry up and see all of them before they are gone. :)

I have enjoyed All the pictures this morning!

Dundee, OH(Zone 5b)

I agree, I love browsing thru these threads drooling over some of the photos, well actually nearly ALL the photos, I love the variations everyone seems to be getting this year, such beauties. I know I take about as many photos of my glories as I do my kids, wonderful to look at over those long dreary winter months!

Jacksonville, AR(Zone 7b)

Lovely morning glories gardener.

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

What is the name of the blue trio?

X

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Roberts Argyreia nervosa bloomed
http://davesgarden.com/forums/t/652816/

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

Roberts Argyreia is new to me. I`m seeing different things every day I visit here and that is just one more reason to come back again!


Xeramtheum,

The blue trio is my new cross I did. It is ukigumo x yogiro. I`m working on trying to get the blizzard color and the attractive picot shaped edge on the other parent. Another quality is the way these two parents are resistant to fungus diseases and rust. (They are not immune to rust but they seem to be more resistant than the others I am observing from my own observations in my own garden.) I want try and propagate those qualities for my own garden. I will not keep growing a plant that does not respond to reasonable care. I`ll send it back to Japan! :) kidding!!!

It may take time and growing space but I`m sure going to try. It is making seed pods so good thing I`ll get the second generation sometime this month to grow again next year.


This message was edited Oct 7, 2006 9:47 PM

Jacksonville, AR(Zone 7b)

Flying Saucer and Pink Tye Dye

Thumbnail by patootie
Wilmington, DE(Zone 7a)

Nice nice photograph of great flowers! Lovely colors!

Joseph

Jacksonville, AR(Zone 7b)

Thank you Joseph. Flying Saucer is a favorite.

Jackie

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Someone drew my attention to the bloom attached...it is an Ipomoea tricolor "Flying Saucers" that has only 4 primary ribs instead of the usual 5 primary ribs with interesting results...I may be 'corny' but I like this square bloom...

TTY,...

Ron

Thumbnail by RON_CONVOLVULACEAE
scio, oregon, OR(Zone 8a)

We had our first frost the morning of October 10th.....BOO HOO!

Wilmington, DE(Zone 7a)

boo to frost, yay to square morning glories, how cool is that, Ron!

Joseph

(Ronnie), PA(Zone 6b)

That is too much!!! LOL

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

I want one of those! Any seeds?

X

Gamleby, Sweden(Zone 7a)

Hi all Sorry for bailing out on the MG treads and Ron thanks for continue them.
I have big trouble with my right shoulder and havent yet got the DR to get there thumbs out and fix it so typing is many times both painfull and impossible and scrolling is even worse.
I stll have some MG:s flowering in the garden and this is amazing because normally by this time of year everything would have been killed by several frost and officially we havent entered fall yet, fall is over a month late but I am not complaining.

Ron I hope you continue with the treads as you are the best person for it and I will try to pop in and I will also try to start some of the beauties aI got from you this winter and thank you for all that I have learned from you regarding MG:S
Janett

Thumbnail by Janett_D
Robertsdale, AL(Zone 8b)

Nice to hear from you again, Janett! I hope your shoulder gets well soon...

Nice picture of Ipomoea lobata. I enjoyed it this year also. My two plants bloomed profusely but did not set seed at all. Does anyone know it this is typical or just a local thing?

Arlan

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Trying to get seeds from the Square MG is a priority for me >but the degree of focus on the part of the person who owns the plant is an unknown factor...Going to do the best I can...

I think Square MG's are 'out of this world'...I want Square MG's(!)...they don't have Square ones in Japan(!) >but I bet they would very much like to(!)...if this could be isolated and stabilized...it would be a new world MG craze...I'm sure of that...I've already got a cultivar name picked out...(Are there many square flowers??!)...even if there is >it doesn't matter 'cause this is the first Square MG that I've ever seen >and it is real >no trick photoshop or other nonsense...I will try...

Janett_D - Glad to hear from you...hope your shoulder get's better soon...We'll keep the MG thread alive...Thanks for all of your support


Arlen - Did the flowers on your plants actually open up properly(?)...did you see pollinators visiting the flowers and/or did you provide hand pollination assistance(?)...I've seen plants where the blooms appeared >but did not actually fully develop for the blooms to open up enough to allow for self and cross fertilization...

The Ipomoea lobata has a reputation for being a late bloomer,but obviously people who have plants that are blooming early and/or profusely should collect and share(!) the seeds from any early blooming and seeding plants...

There are several cultivars of Ipomoea lobata e.g., "Exotic Love". "Jungle Queen" and "Citronella"...The Jungle Queen is reputed to have a deeper and more vivid coloration than the milder colors of the Exotic Love,but I've yet to see bona fide consistency in these potentially different cultivars...the Citronella has flowers that are a creamy lemon yellow and the Citronella cultivar is now rare in the US as light lemon yellow color apparently wasn't as 'catchy' looking as the multi-colored varieties...I don't have any seeds of the Citronella and I do hope somebody will keep it going...you never know what could come in handy as a potential crossing or hybrid candidate...

A particularly fine closeup photo of the inflorescence of Ipomoea lobata in the PlantFiles
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/124859/
some color variants
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/25709/
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/111174/
http://davesgarden.com/pf/showimage/1317/

TTY,...

Ron



This message was edited Oct 12, 2006 4:34 AM

scio, oregon, OR(Zone 8a)

I think the following Haiku goes along with the enthusiasm to breed a new "square" morning glory:


人の世や新朝顔のほだし咲
hito no yo ya shin asagao no hodashi-zaki

world of man--
a new morning-glory
blooms in bondage

Shinji Ogawa comments, "In Issa's day, morning-glories became so popular that many new varieties were created by cross-breeding. Many drawings remain, but some of them we don't know how to reproduce now. The new morning-glories were on sale. Issa may imply that the morning-glory for sale is 'in bondage.'"

In addition to Shinji's vision of this poem, I wonder if a gardener or flower vendor might have tied a morning-glory with string. Issa would prefer to see it growing freely, following its nature, but the "world of man" (hito no yo) has other ideas.

(Ronnie), PA(Zone 6b)

Ron do you think it's the cool weather for the odd shapes?

Thumbnail by luvsgrtdanes
Robertsdale, AL(Zone 8b)

luvsgrtdanes, I think that cool weather increases the likelihood for the edges to curl back. Some of my JMG's did this early in the year when the nights were cool. Later, after the summer warmth...eh...heat... kicked in, they had normal flowers! The flower structure must have something to do with it as well, as some varieties flowered normally during this time.

Here is a flower from yesterday....a feathered, double ipomoea nil flower... - Arlan

Thumbnail by atenkley
Jacksonville, AR(Zone 7b)

Arlan, Gorgeous shade of blue.

Jackie

Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

baolvera - perspectives of other cultures,peoples etc is always appreciated(!) and to be taken with as many grains of salt as necessary...

I enjoy natural and 'man-made' diversity...and if plants being for sale is a form of bondage,perhaps if more of the interesting variations were for sale and therefore made available to those people who would enjoy their beauty >then these variations would have a better chance of continuing to exist in the world of today(!)...as not every person is interested in 'creating' their own...

Every person has to form their own conclusions as to what is 'natural' and to what extent their actions 'should' likewise be 'natural' or not...

The developement of advanced Horticultural and Agricultural techniques has enabled human beings to survive and develop as a species and as a society...although many of these plant cultivation techniques could be viewed as unnatural and perhaps against the 'natural inclination' of the plants...

there aren't many animals that would prefer(!) >to be killed to supply food and other products for humans or other animals...
it is the nature of a rabbit to eat vegetables and to run from predators...it is the nature of a wildcat to capture running rabbits and eat them...
if I could I would ask Issa if it is contrary to Nature for the wildcat to eat rabbits...and if Issa would object to most of what humans have been able to create through the faculty of free thought...
free thought >above and beyond instinct is in the nature of humans or Issa would not have been able to poetically rhapsodize or to use the manmade utensils to write down his thoughts...

perspectives of other cultures,peoples etc is always appreciated(!) and to be taken with as many grains of salt as necessary...

I really enjoy some of the ole' 'rhaps'...


I personally have no qualms about using any techniques that allow me to follow my own vision and experience of beauty and harmony...


luvsgrtdanes - The cold weather and other factors can certainly cause the folding back of the corolla sections between the primary ribs and the colder temperatures can often cause the corolla tissues to not form in the usual manner >therefore perhaps a missing rib...

I can plainly see the tissue folded back on your 5 rib MG to produce a 5 sided pentagonal shape and the square shape of the MG with 4 ribs may have been caused by the failure of the 5th rib to form...I don't know with any certainty until I am able to check it out further...what I do know is that when I see some feature in the plants that I like, that might be able to be isolated and perpetuated >I first try to get seeds from the bloom showing the unusual feature...so,that's what I'm attempting to do...

Thanks for your question...

TTY,...

Ron



This message was edited Oct 13, 2006 9:39 AM

Robertsdale, AL(Zone 8b)

Ron, I'm sorry, I completely overlooked your response to my I. lobata question!

The plants I grew were blooming heavily by the end of May and continued until the middle of August. I was so wrapped up in butterflies and my JMG's at that time that I didn't take many pictures or observe the plants too closely. I do recall seeing humingbirds visit the flowers every day. I did not hand pollinate, and did make a mental note, wondering how the hummingbirds were getting anything with the flowers closed. Of all the pictures I took, only one very grainy experimental shot with high ISO setting shows a light colored flower open. There were orange flowers as well.

Arlan

The DG software for some reason rotated it 90 degrees while uploading...but you get the point!

Thumbnail by atenkley
Netcong, NJ(Zone 5b)

Arlan - Yes,the opening in the corolla allowing access to the nectar located at the bottom of the tube inside the flowers of the Ipomoea lobata is relatively small...
the manner in which the pistil and stamens protrude well beyond the small opening at the top of the corolla indicates that these flowers evolved to be pollinated by the snouts of hummingbirds...
the anthers are actually attached to the stamens by a hinge-like design allowing the anthers to 'swing' aside without breaking off...Ipomoea quamoclit has similarly hinged anthers...

Regarding the failure of your plants to set seed...if you saw hummingbirds visiting the flowers >there should have been adequate cross pollination...yours is the first report I've heard of with this species where the flowers definitely opened,were pollinated and there was sufficient time to allow matured seeds to develop,but for some reason >the seeds did not develop...I can only speculate as to possible self-infertility issues with the strain that you grew and/or as you previously mentioned >that the lack of seed set represents a local phenomemon of some unknown parameters...

I would suggest trying to get seeds from a few different people who collected seeds from off of their own plants...and let's see what next season brings...

TTY,...

Ron

Baton Rouge area, LA(Zone 8b)

Quote:

world of man--
a new morning-glory
blooms in bondage


In America it goes like this:

world of morning glories--
a new man

watches the new blooms
in bondage

time to water again...


I think these flowers have Me captive! :)

scio, oregon, OR(Zone 8a)

I like your revision of the old Haiku poem gardener2005!!!!

scio, oregon, OR(Zone 8a)

The poem is just an old Haiku, not my personal philosophy about breeding new and different MG's. I'm all for it!

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

I know they have me in thrall. The first thing I did in the morning when I got up and there was light outside was to slip into my wellies and trot out to the greenhouse with my camera. That had to be a very scary sight for the teenage boy who lives next door.

X

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