You probably already have a toxic plant list, right?

Beaverton, OR

You probably already have a toxic plant list, right?

If not, we compiled one list on this page...

http://www.mdvaden.com/horses.shtml

We have one for pet birds too - one of the best known on the internet...

http://www.mdvaden.com/bird_page.shtml

Anyhow, there you have it.

The critter below is not ours, but a horse that was at Cannon Beach, Oregon. I thought it was a nice looking horse.

Thumbnail by mdvaden
Brownfield, ME(Zone 4b)

I see you run a landscaping buisness, That is great you take in consideration of the animals. I am in Maine and had to deal with all the red maples that were around. Thanks for the links.

Social Circle, GA(Zone 8a)

I had to cut down 8 red maples that lined my driveway when I moved out here.....boo hoo! They're gorgeous, but not worth the risk~!

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Okay, good - I'm glad you brought that up. Is it red maples or any maple with red leaves? Don't some of the sugar maples get red?

Social Circle, GA(Zone 8a)

I think it's just red maples.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Gotcha - thanks.

mdvaden - thanks much for the info.

And yes, it is a beautiful horse!

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Okay, here's my list - probably under the TMI category, but I like it because it gives the signs, treatment, etc.

BTW, mdvaden, this has some that your list didn't have...maybe walnut trees don't grow in Oregon, I dunno!

BLACK WALNUT (Juglans nigra)

Description
Trees with dark, deeply furrowed bark, compound leaves with approximately 20 leaflets and a spherical fruit (thick, green husk and a hard, brown, furrowed nut)

Geographic Location
Native to northeastern America and to the central plains

Source Of Toxicity
Shavings and sawdust are toxic when used as bedding

Clinical Signs
Signs appear within 24 hours of exposure--laminitis, bounding digital pulse, lower leg edema, fever, increased respiratory rate

Treatment
Remove source of black walnut, wash legs and feet, symptomatic and supportive care


BOXWOOD (Buxus sempervirens)

Description
Evergreen with simple leathery leaves, usually grown as hedge

Geographic Location
Used throughout North America

Source Of Toxicity
Leaves, twigs, clippings

Clinical Signs
Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, convulsions, respiratory failure

Treatment
Activated charcoal, symptomatic care. Boxwood ingestion can be fatal


BRACKEN (Buxus sempervirens)

Also Known As
Bracken fern, brake fern, hog brake

Description
Fern-like leaves up to six feet long

Geographic Location
Throughout North America in forests, open woods, fields

Source Of Toxicity
Toxic whether green or dry. Shows up in hay

Clinical Signs
Clinical signs appear one to two months after ingestion--weight loss, weakness, gait abnormalities, stance with an arched back and legs spread far apart, staggering, slow heart rate, abnormal cardiac rhythm

Treatment
Death usually within 10 days of the onset of symptoms. Can be treated with thiamine injections if diagnosed quickly


BUTTERCUP (Ranunculus spp.)

Also Known As
Tall field buttercup, creeping buttercup

Description
Leaves grow low on the stem, flowering stalk contains five-petaled flowers in spring

Geographic Location
Throughout North America in fields, gardens, woods

Source Of Toxicity
Toxins contained in bulbous root

Clinical Signs
Pain and inflammation of mouth, salivation, diarrhea, dizziness, skin irritation, and depression

Treatment
Decontamination (with activated charcoal and purgatives), demulcents (oily substances for soothing and coating irritated membranes), corticosteroids, antibiotics


CASTOR BEAN (Ricinus communis)

Also Known As
Castor oil plant, palma Christi

Description
Annual up to 12 feet, large palmately lobed leaves, showy red three-parted fruity pods

Geographic Location
Southeast, southwest U.S. naturally, but cultivated everywhere

Source Of Toxicity
Seeds are very poisonous

Clinical Signs
Rapid signs. Dopiness, incoordination, sweating, shock, neck and shoulder spasms, weak and rapid pulse, fever, diarrhea, colic-like pain

Treatment
Activated charcoal, supportive fluid and electrolyte balance, anticonvulsants. This plant is fatal in very small amounts.


CHERRIES, WILD AND CULTIVATED VARIETIES (Prunus spp.)

Description
Trees or shrubs, white or pinkish spring flowers, simple leaves

Geographic Location
Throughout North America

Source Of Toxicity
Cyanide contained in seeds, leaves, bark, and fruit (highest to lowest concentrations). The biggest factor in toxicity is the condition of the plant--wilted plants (such as on a branch blown down from a storm) are the most toxic, while dried and fresh cherry leaves are not as bad

Clinical Signs
Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, convulsions, respiratory failure

Treatment
There is an antidote, but it is often not available quickly enough


FOXGLOVE (Digitalis purpurea)

Description
Large bell-shaped multi-colored flowers

Geographic Location
Ornamental and wild plants found everywhere

Source Of Toxicity
Normally only eaten if found in hay. Whole plant is toxic

Clinical Signs
Diarrhea, abdominal pain, tremors, and convulsions

Treatment
Activated charcoal to prevent further toxin absorption, anti-arrhythmic drug


GROUND IVY (Glecoma hederacea)

Also Known As
Creeping Charlie

Description
Low, prostrate perennial herb with slender four-sided stems that hug the ground, root at their joints, and often cover areas of many square feet. Roundish, scalloped leaves

Geographic Location
Present throughout much of North America

Source Of Toxicity
Often baled in hay, whole plant is toxic

Clinical Signs
Severe sweating accompanied by frothing at the mouth and/or difficulty breathing, pupils dilated, panting

Treatment
Rarely fatal except in large amounts. Supportive care


HOARY ALYSSUM (Berteroa incana)

Description
Member of the mustard family. Hairy stems and leaves, white, four-petaled flowers, up to four feet tall

Geographic Location
Throughout the northern U.S. and southern Canada

Source Of Toxicity
Usually requires significant ingestion (up to 25% of the diet). Toxicity retained on drying. Whole plant is toxic

Clinical Signs
Clinical signs appear 12-48 hours after ingestion--laminitis, lower leg edema, fever, colic, anorexia, dehydration

Treatment
This plant can be lethal-- symptomatic and supportive treatment is recommended


HORSE CHESTNUT (Aesculus hippocastanum)

Also Known As
Buckeye. Other varieties: California buckeye, Ohio buckeye, sweet buckeye, red buckeye

Description
Trees or shrubs with opposite, palmately compound leaves. The glossy brown seeds are one inch in diameter

Geographic Location
Several species grow in the Pacific coast region, Midwest, South, Southeast U.S. Grown as ornamentals

Source Of Toxicity
Young sprouts, leaves, seeds

Clinical Signs
Vomiting, abdominal pain, muscle twitching, weakness, odd gait

Treatment
Supportive care


HORSETAIL (Equisetum spp.)

Also Known As
Mare's tail, scouring rush

Description
Rush-like ridged stalks, papery leaves

Geographic Location
Widespread in North America, often found near bogs and streams

Source Of Toxicity
Leaves contain toxin that destroys vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the body

Clinical Signs
Weakness, inappetence, incoordination, quietness, unresponsiveness, coma

Treatment
Horsetail ingestion can be fatal if not treated with thiamine injections


LARKSPUR (Delphinium spp.)

Description
Deeply lobed palmate leaves, blue spurred elongated flowers

Geographic Location
Native species throughout North America, grown in gardens. Especially a problem in the Rocky Mountains

Source Of Toxicity
Entire plant highly toxic

Clinical Signs
Nervousness, incoordination, staggering, salivating, bloating, abnormal heartbeat, breathing difficulty, paralysis, convulsions, death

Treatment
Larkspur ingestion can be fatal. Supportive care is recommended


LOCOWEED (Astragalus and Oxytropis spp.)

Also Known As
Many varieties, i.e. purple loco, wooly loco, stemless loco, etc.

Description
Low-growing ground covers to two-foot-tall clumps of flowers

Geographic Location
Throughout the western U.S. in semi-arid foothills and plains

Source Of Toxicity
Horses usually avoid locoweed, but once sampled it might be addictive

Clinical Signs
Signs appear after prolonged exposure--locoweed affects the brain. Altered gaits, aimless wanderings, impaired vision, erratic behavior, listlessness, overreactive, darkened feces, fever, abortion, birth defects, convulsions

Treatment
Quality diet, slow recovery. Horses with severe clinical signs may not recover completely. Supportive care


LOCUST TREES (Robinia pseudoacacia)

Also Known As
Black locust, yellow locust, false acacia, clammy locust

Description
Sized from shrub to large tree. Compound leaves, pea-like flowers, long pod-like fruit

Geographic Location
Eastern and central U.S., southern Canada

Source Of Toxicity
Bark, young sprouts, branches, posts from locust trees somewhat toxic

Clinical Signs
Onset within hours. Loss of appetite, general weakness depression, mild colic

Treatment
Activated charcoal, supportive fluid and electrolyte balance. Occasionally lethal


LUPINE (Lupinus spp.)

Description
White, blue, purple or pinkish pea-shaped flowers on upright stalks

Geographic Location
Found in a wide variety of landscapes from ocean beaches to high mountain pastures

Source Of Toxicity
Young lupines and those going to seed are the most toxic

Clinical Signs
Gastrointestinal irritation, diarrhea, altered gait, nervousness, leg twitching, loss of muscle control, prostrations, convulsions

Treatment
Symptomatic treatment


MILK VETCH (Astragalus spp.)

Description
Small compound leaves, pea-like flowers in elongated clusters, various-shaped pods

Geographic Location
Wide range of habitats throughout North America

Source Of Toxicity
Leaves, pods, seeds

Clinical Signs
A roaring sound when exhaling, salivating, staggering

Treatment
Ingestion is usually fatal due to sudden asphyxiation
Various species cause different problems requiring different treatment approaches


NIGHTSHADES (Solanum spp.)

Also Known As
Plant species include black night-shade, bittersweet nightshade, horse nettle, silverleaf nightshade, ground cherry, Jerusalem cherry

Description
Up to four feet tall, white potato-like flowers, clustered berries. Some varieties are evergreens with yellow or red fruit

Geographic Location
Fields, open woodlands, pastures, and waste places throughout North America

Source Of Toxicity
Leaves and green berries (toxicity retained on drying)

Clinical Signs
Central nervous system signs: depression, incoordination, tremors, posterior weakness, prostration
Gastrointestinal signs: inappetence, salivation, vomiting, diarrhea

Treatment
Symptomatic and supportive care


OAKS (Quercus spp.)

Description
Range in size from small shrubs to tall trees. Fruit is a smooth nut with a cap (acorn)

Geographic Location
All parts of North America

Source Of Toxicity
Oak buds, leaves, acorns contain gallotannin. Spring and fall most common periods for poisoning

Clinical Signs
Loss of appetite, depression, constipation, black tarry feces, weakness, prostration. Animals may be jaundiced, have blood in the urine, and be dehydrated

Treatment
Decontamination with active charcoal and purgatives, symptomatic and supportive care


OLEANDER (Nerium oleander)

Also Known As
Rose laurel, adelfa, roseniorbeer

Description
Ornamental evergreen shrub with long linear leaves, white or pink flowers

Geographic Location
Southern U.S., California

Source Of Toxicity
All varieties and plant parts extremely toxic. Leaves get mixed in with clippings and hay

Clinical Signs
Profuse diarrhea which might be bloody, abnormal heartbeat, chilled extremities

Treatment
Immediate veterinary attention to prevent death, which often occurs within eight to 24 hours after ingestion. Evacuation of digestive tract, administration of activated charcoal/cathartic


POISON HEMLOCK (Conium maculatum)

Also Known As
European hemlock, spotted hemlock, wild carrot

Description
Plants up to ten feet tall. Smooth, hollow stems covered with purple spots. Leaves are finely divided (similar to carrots or parsley). Large white to pale yellow taproot

Geographic Location
Throughout North America along fencerows, meadows, streams

Source Of Toxicity
Roots, young plants, seeds

Clinical Signs
Signs appear within minutes--muscle tremors, ataxia, frequent defecation, excessive urination, increased respiratory rate, abdominal pain

Treatment
Decontamination with activated charcoal and purgatives. Horse might die or make a full recovery


RED CLOVER (Trifolium pratense)

Description
Reddish three-leaf clover

Geographic Location
Cultivated extensively in North America

Source Of Toxicity
Toxicity is caused by a fungus of red clover. The fungus can also appear in white clover, though this is less common

Clinical Signs
Signs appear after 30-60 minutes--excessive salivation, diarrhea, frequent urination

Treatment
Horses usually recover in one to four days with supportive care. Remove clover from pasture


RED MAPLE (Acer rubrum)

Description
Tree trunk and leaves are broad; leaves have three to five lobes with palmately arranged veins. The fruit is a two-winged, two-seeded structure

Geographic Location
Native to Eastern U.S., Canada, westward to Missouri and eastern Texas. May be planted elsewhere

Source Of Toxicity
Fresh, wilted, and dried leaves

Clinical Signs
Depression, jaundice, anemia, discolored urine, increased respiratory and heart rates

Treatment
Symptomatic and supportive care. Red maple ingestion can be fatal


RHODODENDRON (Rhododendron spp.)

Also Known As
Rhodora, azalea, white laurel, great laurel, rose bay, California rose bay, Lapland rose bay

Description
Large shrubs or small trees with evergreen leaves and terminal clusters of large, attractive pink to purple flowers

Geographic Location
Native and ornamental species found throughout North America

Source Of Toxicity
Leaves and nectar

Clinical Signs
Salivation, emesis, diarrhea, muscular weakness, slow heart rate, difficulty breathing, depression, prostration

Treatment
Activated charcoal, cathartic (purgative), symptomatic and supportive care


ST. JOHN'S WORT (Hypericum perforatum)

Also Known As
Klamath weed

Description
Erect herb up to three feet tall, dark dots on leaves when held up to light, yellow flowers in terminal clusters

Geographic Location
Aggressive weeds of roadsides, pastures, ranges throughout most of U.S. and southern Canada

Source Of Toxicity
Less toxic when dried, but still poisonous when found in hay

Clinical Signs
Photosensitization in unpigmented skin, which can become red and irritated when exposed to sunlight

Treatment
Supportive care


SUDAN GRASS (Sorghum vulgare var. sudanense)

Also Known As
Hybrid Sudan, sorghum, sorghum grass, milo, Johnson grass

Description
Tall plant with coarse, dull green leaves, terminal flowers, seeds are dark brown to purple-black

Geographic Location
Central and great plains, can be grown throughout North America

Source Of Toxicity
Foliage, not seeds. More deadly after frost (wilted)

Clinical Signs
Might graze for one week to six months prior to clinical signs. Urinary incontinence and dribbling of urine, bladder inflammation, posterior ataxia, incoordination

Treatment
Supportive care is recommended. Sudangrass poisoning is survivable, but nerve regeneration or recovery is not expected once nerve signs develop


TALL FESCUE (Festuca arundinacea)

Description
Grass

Geographic Location
Widely grown forage grass in the U.S.

Source Of Toxicity
Grass invaded by fungus

Clinical Signs
Late-term abortions, prolonged gestation, difficult births, thickened or retained placentas, foal deaths

Treatment
Supportive care. Domperidone to reverse the effects in late-gestation mares as prescribed by a veterinarian


WATER HEMLOCK (Cicuta spp.)

Also Known As
Spotted hemlock, cowbane, spotted cowbane, poison parsnip, false parsley, spotted parsley, muskrat weed, fever root, mock-eel root

Description
Plants two to 10 feet tall. Smooth, hollow stems covered with purple spots, compound leaves, small white compound flowers

Geographic Location
All areas of North America along ditches, flood plains, low mead-ows, fertile uncultivated areas

Source Of Toxicity
Roots, leaves

Clinical Signs
Rapid onset of signs including muscle tremors, teeth grinding, abdominal pain, convulsions, death

Treatment
Death can occur within 45 minutes, but water hemlock ingestion is survivable. Supportive care


WHITE SNAKEROOT (Eupatorium rugosum)

Also Known As
Snakeroot, burrow weed, white sanicle

Description
Erect plant two to three feet tall, heart-shaped, serrated leaves, white flowers in top clusters in the fall

Geographic Location
Varieties in eastern, midwestern, southern U.S., westward to Minnesota. Similar toxin exists in jimmy weed, rayless goldenrod (Haplopappus)

Source Of Toxicity
Vegetative plant parts

Clinical Signs
Signs appear in two to three weeks--depression, weakness, heart failure, tremors, posterior weakness

Treatment
Symptomatic and supportive treatment. Poisoning is survivable, but with potential long-term cardiac muscle scarring


YELLOW STAR THISTLE/RUSSIAN KNAPWEED (Centauria solstitialis/Centauria repens)

Yellow Star Thistle Also Known As
Barnaby's thistle

Description
Yellow flowers with starburst thorns. Russian knapweed has the same toxin

Geographic Location
Western U.S.

Source Of Toxicity
Toxic when dried

Clinical Signs
Must be consumed for 30 days or more before clinical signs appear--inability to swallow, eat, or drink; chewing; unusual tongue and lip movements; frequent yawning; unusual postures

Treatment
Causes brain damage. Once symptoms appear, nerve symptoms are irreversible


YEW (Taxus spp.)

Also Known As
English Yew, Japanese Yew, American Yew, Western Yew

Description
Landscape shrubs with small, narrow, strap-like evergreen leaves. Fruit is red and fleshy

Geographic Location
Varieties found throughout North America

Source Of Toxicity
Whole plant is extremely toxic except red fleshy part of fruit (as little as six to eight ounces of fresh yew can kill a horse)

Clinical Signs
Rapid onset of signs including trembling, muscle weakness, difficulty breathing, collapse, death

Treatment
Symptomatic and supportive care. Treatment is often unrewarding

Beaverton, OR

Sure, we have plenty of Walnut.

In fact, Black Walnut is the 3rd one on my list.

It's a task to edit the text sometimes on these lists.

I had Boxwood on a shared line, because two break symbols were missing.

Your list has Boxwood = Bracken Fern in one spot, although they are different genus.

It seems like every time I proof read my pages, there's one or two things to edit that I missed the time before.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Wow, I didn't check to see how long that list was on this page - sorry about the scrolling!

LOL, it figures - I didn't see your walnut. Sorry about that!

No list is going to be perfect - when I lived in AZ almost nothing applied other than Oleander and Datura. Which reminds me, especially because they seem to be so popular, the Dat cousins Brugmansia (Angel's Trumpets) should probably be on the A list.

Now that I live in a place that gets more than 6" of rain per year, I'm scrambling to get all of these puppies I.D.d.... came across (yet another) list from Cornell yesterday that had even more (grrrr... why do I love such a delicate animal???) -also has pictures. Of course, I no longer have the link....

On the banks of the , VA(Zone 7a)

Thank you both. : )

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Absolutely.

Now, does anyone know how to get rid of this wild onion that is all over the place? I'm sure the broad-leaf spray won't get it and if it's a matter of cutting it down until it goes away, it kind of makes the whole pasture idea moot....?

Social Circle, GA(Zone 8a)

LOL! I have the same problem! My horses seem to like it. Gives them a garlicky-onion breath. But my next-to-be-fenced front yard is nothing but wild onions. I heard there was a Chinese rest. in Snellville (down 2 small cities from me) that would buy them, but their bulbs are so deep! No way! I used Amine 2-4-D and it didn't do much....not even to the broadleaf weeds. Any one got any secrets to share?

Alpharetta, GA

Thank you both for all the info! I like the one on birds too as I am never sure what I can give mine!

On the banks of the , VA(Zone 7a)

Develop a taste for sour cream and onion dip? Buy a lot of chips?

I caution you letting the horses eat it.

Yonks ago, I had a couple of goats. Unbeknownst to me, I also had a neighbour growing pot in the woods. Follow along with me....in this exercise please understand:


Goats = any free-ranging livestock
Pot = any unwanted plant
Growth medium = poop


Goats + pot + free broadcasting of seeds in growth medium = BIG PROBLEM. Sometimes one that involves helicoptors and men in black and other exciting stuff.

Now, granted, I don't think anyone's going to bust you for growing wild onions except for Martha Stuart, but I felt it was my civic duty to warn you.


Fuquay-Varina, NC(Zone 7a)

I would suggest to anyone concerned about toxic plants in your area to contact your local ag extension agent to get a list of toxic plants that pertain to your area. For the most part, alot of these toxic plants aren't very palatable to horses and aren't likely to be eaten unless the horses is starving or just that stupid.



hahahah luna! were your horses getting high in the pasture, or did you just notice the leaves popping up everywhere?

On the banks of the , VA(Zone 7a)

The horses weren't eating it. The goats were. And they were insane. Really, truly insane. They went through this period where they kept disappearing every day down into this SWAMP at the bottom of the hill, I couldn't figure out what they were doing, except they always acted like looney tunes when I fed at night.

Then the next spring my ex-husband wandered by to do something for me, I don't know, hook up the ponies fans or something, and he said, "Uh, honey? Did you mean to be growing an acre of pot?" I had no clue.

It wasn't till my ex told me that I knew.

He went out and bought a BUTTLOAD of Round Up.

Fuquay-Varina, NC(Zone 7a)

hahahahaha

stoner goats!!

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

OMG- that is too funny!!

"Hey Billy, let's go down to the swamp..."

On the banks of the , VA(Zone 7a)

And I wanted to back up what Gaia said...in the summer, when everything is blooming and has a scent, the horses are pretty canny about avoiding poisonous stuff. It's when it dries up in the winter time and forage in general is a bit limited, that poisonous plants are an issue. That, and in hay. So this is a pretty timely reminder.


Now....if you ladies would oblige me by putting out a pocket sized version of this, complete with pictures of each no-no, taken from the back of a tractor/horse so I can identify this stuff on the fly, I'd be grateful. ; )

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Do you carry a PDA? We can do anything....

Middleton, TN(Zone 7a)

LOL, love the "Stoner Goat" story. That is just sooo hilarious! Made my day... On a serious note, I wondered if anyone knew about Morning Glories and if they are poisonous to horses. My horses are pretty smart about what not to eat it seems but I wanted to plant Morning Glories and wasn't sure. I have looked on the internet and links posted in this forum and have yet to find it on any "toxic to horses" list. Who better to ask than my expert DG community. Thanks!

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

I think you're pretty safe - a few of the wild ones will pop up in the fields here, so either they don't care for them or they've eaten them and have been fine.

Where's Middleton?

Social Circle, GA(Zone 8a)

Morning Glories are actually poisonous for horses, but they taste bad so they won't eat them unless there is nothing else to eat.

I found this:
Poisonous principles and symptoms

The leaves and stems are toxic containing an unknown toxin. Symptoms of poisoning include and gastrointestinal distress accompanied by explosive diarrhea, frequent urination, and depressed reflexes. Prolonged consumption results in anorexia, wasting-away, depression, dyspnea, coma, and in severe cases, death. Consumption of seeds causes nausea, psychotic reactions, and hallucination.

For reference: http://www.blueskyanimal.com/horse_toxic_weeds.htm
http://www.angelfire.com/pro/realm/PoisonousPlants.html

This message was edited Jul 8, 2009 8:37 AM

Social Circle, GA(Zone 8a)

OMG! I did not know that Johnson grass is poisonous! I've got it creeping into my pasture from the ditch....crud.

Richmond, TX

Johnson grass isn't poisonous unless it is stressed - frozen, droughty, etc. It usually won't survive in a pasture as the animals eat it off too short. Don't panic.

Social Circle, GA(Zone 8a)

Cool, but cutting is listed a stressor....good thing I rarely do that eh? LOL I would image that eating it would stress it as well. But, it's been there in the ditch for 4 years and the horses don't lean out to eat it, and I have never pulled the wandering ones that have come across the fence.... If it hasn't killed them yet, I am sure it won't now! I still don't want it taking hold in the pasture.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

It's a tough one to get rid of, lotsa big old stoloniferous roots, but if it's kept mowed pretty close it will die.

Richmond, TX

Our stock do the necessary mowing. Any Johnson grass that appears in a resting pasture is gone almost immediately. I'm just careful when I time the move back into such a pasture.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

There ya go...! I'm also bush hogging the heck out of my pastures this year, trying to not have to deal with more weed seed than necessary. I'll do another seeding of orchard grass/ clover and am considering doing fescue, too, since we're not doing any more baby stuff.

Middleton, TN(Zone 7a)

Hey Pagancat.. Middleton is about 12 miles south of Bolivar, or 20 miles N of Walnut, MS. Very small town/community, population about 700. We moved here from Calif last Oct and love TN ;- ) About the hay.. My horses were raised on a beautiful blue grass- alfalfa hay that we paid $16 a bale for (all hay prices in Cali were high btw). It's been an adjustment trying to find a good quality hay for them. A few had gotten really thin across the top and I freaked out. I had tried some losy alfalfa from Jackson, TN, round bales of ? that 4 mares would go through in a week and still look thin , tried adding grain.. it was so frustrating. I ended up recently finding some really nice common bermuda bales that had been cut the day before and had been well fertilized. You wouldn't believe the transformation-- they are looking fat and sassy again! Anyway, my point was why doesn't someone out here plant some really nice alfalfa-blue grass? I promise the horses would love you for it ;-).. It's like an entree and a dessert all in one.. He he What kind of horses do you have?

Middleton, TN(Zone 7a)

Thanks for the info on the Morning Glories, Jenks. I appreciate it. Not what I wanted to hear, but good to know. My horses are pretty good at sniffing out bad plants so I don't think it would be a problem for them. I don't plan on having horses in the pasture that's near my planting area by the time the plants are fully grown so I think I will be ok. Thanks!

Social Circle, GA(Zone 8a)

It's too hot here (GA) for alfalfa. It costs a ton for the seed and then only lasts a few seasons.....I don't know about TN, but our alfalfa is shipped here from MI (I think) usually or somewhere cooler.

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Hey Mechelle! My DH was born and raised a bit north of you, in Ripley. Welcome to Tennessee - glad you love it. We moved here from Phoenix, but I'm originally from the Detroit area. The summers are a little painful for me, but the falls and springs are glorious.



Yup, same here- alfalfa is more of northern-midwest sort of plant - I think they even grow a lot of it in Canada. That's where my pellets/ cubes come from, usually. Honestly, I don't think my horses could take anything that high calorie without exploding. They are on pure pasture right now and totally chunking out. I have 2 TN walkers, a spotted saddle horse, an Appaloosa and 2 Draft x Paints. I'm betting you have Arabs or TBs?

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

Here we get mostly timothy and orchard mix but when we are lucky enough to get hay off the strip jobs it's little blue stem. The horses do great on it and they eat it like crazy. They use it to seed the strip jobs for reclamation.

The horse in the first post on this thread looks like a Suffolk Punch. I was reading they are endangered as a breed. Not many here in the states.

Social Circle, GA(Zone 8a)

I had been ordering Tim/Alfalfa mix, but there is never any alfalfa in it, so I just started ordering straight Timothy. Same price anyway, but nice alfalfa is about 16$ per bale, and the Tim is 13$. The horses like it and it's too hot for alfalfa right now. I like to feed it in winter to warm them up. Digestion of alfalfa actually gives off heat and warms them like hot cocoa does people.

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

I think the little blue stem does the same thing. I would never give it ot Shaq because it gets his motoer running if you know what I mean. LOL It's plain grass hay for him and lots of it. Had him out today and he had a great time. Wish I was physically up to riding him. Hope to in a few weeks, I sure miss that awesome rack of his.

Richmond, TX

Was that "motor" or "meteor"? Or perhaps it" one and the same...

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

His motor. The meteor hit me while I was typing. LOL

(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN(Zone 6b)

Loose manure? Boy, does Mac have a problem with that...

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

Not loose manure. I mean it revs him up. Gets him to hot to handle easily. If any of mine ever have loose manure, it worries me.

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