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Datura that looks like a Brug

Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

This morning, I went outside and found this. Since it has lost most of the lower leaves, this Datura looks a lot like a Brugmansia. This picture certainly shows how the two can be easily confused. (The wire is an electric deer fence.)

Thumbnail by lily13
Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

Here is a shot from another side.

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Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

That's really neat .. I've never considered pruning my dats into a tree form.

X

South West, LA(Zone 9a)

I have a double purple that grew up in to a tree all by itself. I really needed a bush there but Im still happy with it. Ill try to get a pic in the morning
Caren

Central, AL(Zone 7b)

Lily13;
There has to be a secret on growing Dat. on the ground and to be that impressive, not only in size. Their blosoms over all. It's a 10.
When I first discovered Dat. It was a white one that I saw, grew in b/w cracks on a pavement. Out in full sun here in our hot and humid weather. I thought, man what a cool way to train your moonflower vine. Come to find out it was a white dat.
Anyhooo, I searched, and searched. Finally got some of my own. None of them flourish like the one that I've seen. Now yours is far surpassed what I've witnessed.
In pot culture. They did ok. At a rate of 5 on 1-10 scale. I was about to give up on these, and plan on give away all the seeds that I've gathered since they're too fussy. Is there any remedy? I'm losing interest on this plant. Should I not?
Kim

Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

Lily_love,

Actually, I did absolutely nothing for this plant. It self-seeded from one that I grew in that bed last year, I simply did not pull it up. However, on one of the discussion threads last year, someone revealed a secret that they stumbled on by accident. The put their daturas into a planter box that was mostly compost, and they grew to tremendous size and flower production.

The flower bed that grew the datura in the picture is also mostly compost. Originally, it was nasty clay soil, so I just put as much compost and organic material as I could find into the area and mixed it all up. I had several of these same daturas self-seed into the ground around my compost pile, out back, and they have gotten enourmous as well.

Here is a picture of more of the self-seeded daturas in the front flower bed. They got a lot bigger than this before I cut them down to allow sun to reach the rose bush in back. One of the plants must have had a spread of close to 10 feet across.

Thumbnail by lily13
Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

Here is a picture of the datura that I let grow for a while by the compost pile.

Thumbnail by lily13
Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

Here are two that self-seeded into a crack in the cement of our back patio area. The large one eventually died, but the small one is still alive and very large.

Sheral

Thumbnail by lily13
Central, AL(Zone 7b)

Thank You, Lily13 for sharing such helpful information. I'll give it my all next growing season, and see if I can meet my expectation of this beautiful plants. In the evening, they emits a wonderful fragrant that's difficult to ignore.

Austin, TX(Zone 8b)

Lily_love,

Just relax and start putting all of your yard cuttings and such in a single place. Then next year, drop a few seeds into that spot. Daturas are essentially weeds, and they want to grow. One thing to keep in mind, is that they do not transplant well, so try not to disturb them once they start growing. I had an area with hundreds of little seedlings, and I transplanted some of them while they were still quite small, taking a lot of the dirt around the roots to minimize the shock. Most of them survived, but they have stayed quite small, and are not performing nearly as well as the undisturbed ones. Good luck!

Sheral

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