September alpines

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Starting this off, another plant that blooms copiously all through the season... (seeds copiously too, so I'm not sure I'd let it loose in my rock garden, though it's great in the border) - Symphyandra hofmannii:


Thumbnail by altagardener
Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

A little fall color* on Saxifraga 'Winifred Bevington':

*Or so I assume... unless it's in the throes of death, I suppose ;-)


This message was edited Sep 13, 2007 10:02 AM

Thumbnail by altagardener
Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Silene schafta:

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Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

The fall flowers of Leibnitzia anandria:

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Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

And, even less impressive in flower (brace yourselves!), Bolax gummifera ( the former(?) Azorella trifurcata):



Edit: Or is it now Bolax gummifera??... Please correct me on any IDs or on anything else that I may be getting wrong!

This message was edited Sep 13, 2007 2:05 PM

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Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Cheatbomb on the Leibnitza. I have those too. I notice yours are doing the same thing. Mine use to be perfect dandelion heads, a bit larger than dandelions - like a very small goat's beard (Tragopogon sp.) Each seed and its umbrella perfectly formed and displayed. Now they're like your pic - seeds tight and congested. I noticed that young plants still display the prettier, former form. Is this your experience too?

BTW, I have Leibnitzia nepalense seedlings this year. They all threw up the summer "flower" too, but as a much smaller plant. We'll see what they do next season, if they survive the winter.

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Not knowing if you need be concerned but my Winifred Beavington stays deep green year-round...I've never seen reddish older leaves.

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

I got a chance to snap this one this afternoon..Pterocephalus perennis. Mostly finished but still a scattered flower still coming.

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Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

That last one's definitely on my list. Am I seeing this correctly: the "flower" consists of rays on the edges and florets in the center, like sunflowers or scabiosa? And the foliage is soooooooooooo cool!

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Leftwood,
No, the fall flowers on my Leibnitizia have always been a very full "puff" as shown, never resembling the looser translucent corona (if that's what you're referring to?) of a dandelion or goatsbeard. Yes, I remembered you had these - again, from an old GW Alpine Gardening posting. (On that same posting, I do recall making a mild complaint about the fall flowers not opening fully.... but I was later able to conclude that I just wasn't paying attention! On the photo I just posted, you can see flowers in various stages of bloom, including some with the seeds dispersed.) At that time it seemed you were wintering them indoors - I assume you keep them outdoors now? I find they are totally hardy and vigorous self-seeders... luckily the leaves and plant form are attractive.

"Cheatbomb"...hmm, I know I live under a rock, but I have no idea what this means, LOL! I attempted to look it up, and the nearest phrase to it is something to do with video games...viz. cheating at? You young whippersnappers, inventing words again!


The pterocephalus is very nice - interesting seedhead. In the Dipsacacea (Teasel Family) and closely related to Scabiosa (according to the following NARGS Plant of the Month article about P. pinardii):
http://www.nargs.org/potm/potm_jul03.html

This message was edited Sep 14, 2007 12:45 AM

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Check out Succisia pratensis 'Nana'..another Teasel family alpine...pretty much over now but still a few lingering flowers, much like the Pterocephalus.

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Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

I knew I wasn't getting something quite right from memory, came to me later: ray florets and disc florets. anyway, question answered. Thanks

looser translucent corona of a dandelion, that's excactly what I mean. Even my first season Leibnitzia nepalense had this preferred form. Regarding anandria, they have always been outside year round, but insulated and covered the first winter. They're very hardy here without protection, and tolerate a good amount of early spring wet too.

Cheatbomb: a colloquial term (maybe even in just my old neighborhood) meaning the wining "no fair", and used by kids under 10.

Todd, an interesting two headed syndrome on that Succisia. Is that the normal growth pattern, and does it do that often?

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Re. "cheatbomb on Leibnitzia"...
Ah, it crossed my mind that perhaps you were implying that Leibnitzia anandria was not sufficiently "alpine-ish", but then I thought, "Nah, it couldn't possibly be that.. why, Leftwood himself posted the plant on the GW Alpines forum a little while back." So, I figured, well, it might be in that grey area but if it's good enough for Leftwood, heck, I'll post it!

(LOL! Just funnin' with ya!)

This message was edited Sep 14, 2007 4:05 PM

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Succisia often has two heads per stem.

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Sedum cauticola is just starting.

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Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Thanks for the pics, both of you. What is S. cauticola 'Lidakense' 's claim to fame? Supposedly, I have had both the species and the cultivar, and I can't tell the difference.

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Neither can I! Lidakense is what I have photographed.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

And now, another in the same vein of floral magnificence that you have come to expect from my postings in this thread...
Draba rigida.


LOL! Good thing its April-May display is many hundreds of times more spectacular than this!

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Sebastopol, CA(Zone 9a)

I positively love Draba, Altagardener, and the foliage on yours is so beautiful that it hardly needs flowers.

Nice Succisia, Todd.

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