New troughs

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

New plants have been installed, and now to see what makes it through the winter.
From upper right, clockwise:
Lamium garganicum ssp. garganicum - I expect this will overgrow its space, but that's its home for now.
Claytonia megarhiza - splendid native plant.
Anemone speciosa - yellow flowering in spring.
Acantholimon caesareum - I grew A. glumaceum seed last year, and it wintered over, so we'll see.
Potentilla fruticosa 'Cascade Cushion' - should provide long season bloom.

Thumbnail by altagardener
Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

After doing this one, I'm not sure I've made the rock work "radical" enough in the earlier troughs! ;-> (It doesn't show very well from this angle, but there is a prominent fin of rock bisecting the trough, with another slab sticking up behind it, forming a crevice.)
From upper right, clockwise:
Iris reichenbachii
Androsace studiosorum 'Chumbyi' - no question about hardiness for this one.
Convolvulus boisseri v. boisseri - A very beautiful plant. Now I think I should have tucked it into a crevice so that the finely-hairy silver leaves would stand out against the rock. Hmmm....
Zauschneria californica ssp. latifolia - for brilliant, late bloom. It's "cousin", the subspecies Z. garettii has done nicely in the yard for many years.
Junellia wilzeckia
Dracocephalum aff. densum - said to be suitable for troughs - something of a surprise, as all the other dracocephalum I have get fairly large.
Calyptridium umbellatum v. caudiciferum

This message was edited Sep 15, 2007 11:38 PM

Thumbnail by altagardener
Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

From upper left (Edit: not "right", oops), clockwise:
Asperula gussonii
Hypericum rhodoppeum
Saponaria pulvinaris
Oxytropis parryi
Gypsophila aretioides
Penstemon rupicola
'Myrtle Herbert'
Edrianthus pumilio

This message was edited Sep 16, 2007 12:00 AM

Thumbnail by altagardener
Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

From upper right, clockwise:
Cotoneaster microphyllus
Aubretia deltoidea
'Blue Indigo' - I imagine this will soon be too big for the trough.
Physoplexis comosa
Gentiana cachmerica
Salix serpyllifolia
- nearly invisible in the photo.
Oxalis enneaphylla 'alba' - tucked back where it will, with hope, get a bit of shade.
Dianthus myrtinervius ssp. caespitosus

This rock arrangement is starting to bug me - the offset fracture seems a little much... I'll see what I can do about it tomorrow.

P.S. I did one other trough as well, but seem to have accidentally deleted the photo, so I'll probably be back, imposing on your good natures with that one too! Anyway, it was an absolutely splendid fall day today - just terrific for playing in the dirt!

Thumbnail by altagardener
St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Looking good! I love the crevice style!

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Thanks, Todd!
Here's a close-up of the little beauty, Convolvulus boisseri v. boisseri:
(Said on the Beaver Creek website to be "bone-hardy".... we shall see, of course, but it sounds good!)

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Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

The lovely pleated leaves of Oxalis enneaphylla 'alba':

(This one will certainly be a "test", I think. So far, I'm only growing O. acetosella, the native species that ranges as far west as Manitoba.)

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Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

The last new trough.
From upper center, clockwise (ignoring the overhanging lavender):
Silene nigrescens
Betula nana
'Ingerwersen's Form ex. Norway'
Daphne kosaninii
Thymus sipyleus
Pterocephalus pinardii

Some tiny sempervivums transplanted from another trough
Limonium minutum (center)

Thumbnail by altagardener
Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

And the most intriguing plant of this order, Ulmus parvifolium 'Davidii'. This is an amazing little plant - the leaves are only 5mm long!

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St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

That convolvulus died on me! I now grow one in a pot that I overwinter in my frost-free basement. I do the same with my Oxalis because they are too precious to loose!

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

All those wonderful new plants I've never heard (or only heard of)! Can't wait to see them in there truer form, once they have settled in. I really like the trough that's bugging you. Remember that when the plants grow, it won't be so "stark" anyway. I'll bet you'll get the best comments on that one from visitors.

I just found out that Betula nana grows in northern Minnesota! My friend grew some from seed he brought back from Finland, and gave me one. It is so cute! But alas, the heat here did it it (I think).

My Gypsophila aretioides looks like this one: http://www.laporteavenuenursery.com/html/gypsophila_aretioides.html

I have been making "crevices" under the surface with styrofoam sheets. Really, it just happens that way, as I was looking for a way to lighten the weight of the trough. I hope they don't work their way up out of the soil. We'll just see how things work out in a few years.

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

And also, the Iris reichenbachii I grew from seed looks just like yours. But the ones I bought are only half as large as their normal growth pattern. But, that might change since I took them out of the little pots and into a trough.

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Betula nana aka glandulosa is native to limestone regions of western Newfoundland. Locally it is quite common. I don't have it but I do have Betula pumila... very similar but the leaves turn red in the fall.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

It's native here too, through the boreal forest, alpine and sub-alpine zones. Got one from a native plant restoration place some time ago, and have had it growing in an acid bed. Bought it as "bog birch" - I should key it out, just for fun, to see if I can tell that it's not B. pumila - also native. B. apoiensis has also been growing in the same situation for some years and is now 10-12" tall; should be turning color soon.

Leftwood, so it sounds like you use styrofoam sheets under the soil to restrict the root run? Very clever... I suppose, using the fishbox hypertufa method, that one could even make fake rock slabs and have them exposed in the troughs.
As our troughs haven't been moved around, weight has been less of a concern. Something we are putting to trial though is whether or not winter hardiness of the plants within is impaired by having the troughs set up on hypertufa blocks. I'd like to create an effect of a trough garden (out in our otherwise "useless to gardening" driveway, LOL!), with the troughs set up at different heights to add interest... but need to "test" the effect, we think. Hardly a scientific test - we'll just leave a couple of troughs in the backyard up on the blocks with mulch around the base and see what happens, then spread the mulch on the paths in spring. (Of course, we would not be using mulch on the driveway in any case... well, the test might have to be in two steps!)

This message was edited Sep 18, 2007 10:00 AM

This message was edited Sep 18, 2007 10:01 AM

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Betula glandulifera (pumila var. glandulifera) is common in the right places in the northern 2/3 of MN. I have some started from seed, just for the heck of it. Very easy.

Restricting the root zone with the styrofoam was just a happy coincidence of using less mineral soil to lighten the trough. Another added advantage is that freezing expansion of the soil can be taken up by the styrofoam, rather than causing pressure on the hypertufa.

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