Our 19th Annual Photo Contest is now open for entries. You can submit your best images HERE

Winterizing a "climbing rose" - How to needed ...

Des Moines, IA(Zone 5a)

I know how to winterize my small Knockout rose but what about the climbing rose...do I cut the cane's to the ground before adding mulch & protection OR do I try to cover the whole thing? I dont know the "type" of climber it is & it was added new in the spring & not much flowering happened over the summer/fall.
Thanks,Jill

Peekskill, NY(Zone 6b)

No, don't cut them to the ground! You can cut off the ends of unsecured canes to keep them from whipping around in the wind, which can stress the base and roots of the plant. You might drape burlap or other breathable cloth over it as a wind breaker. You can also spray it with Wilt Pruf. And make sure it's amply watered before the ground freezes. The biggest threat isn't always the cold; it's dessication.

Des Moines, IA(Zone 5a)

Thank you , I'ts a fairly new plant, I did remove the upper most canes above the cover around it, I used leaves around the bottom for the insulation inside, I hope it's not too much insulation - we'll see in the spring! I've never had a climber before - thanks agan for the information.
Jill

Peekskill, NY(Zone 6b)

Mom,

Some advice about the leaves around the base. Some leaves absorb and retain moisture, which can have a rotting effect, while others don't. For example, maple leaves tend to stay wet and can prevent circulation, so I don't use them around my roses. However, oak leaves are a good choice. They don't get as "mushy".

Athens, PA

This past year, I put in 2 Climbing Icebergs to grow up my arbor, 2 New Dawns to grow up the side of my house, 1 Pinata, 1 Sunset and 1 Golden Showers. I plan on mounding the dirt around the base of the plants this weekend, but I am wondering about covering the canes with burlap. Right now I can do this, as these roses are not even as tall as I am yet. What I am wondering is what happens when some of these roses end up king sized? I know that New Dawn can be quite a monster.

Also, what does the burlap do?

Thank you in advance for your help.

Carolyn

Peekskill, NY(Zone 6b)

The burlap or other light cloth works as a wind breaker. Winds have a dessicating effect, in that they can dry out the moisture of canes. Dessication from drying winds can be harder on some roses than cold temps. It depends on the rose's general cold hardiness, and the extent to which the ground freezes or not during the winter months. When the ground freezes, water may not be able to be absorbed as readily by the roots.

Adrian, MO(Zone 6a)

i agree with repeat bloomer. you might say the burlap acts as a mulch. and it also breathes.
if the roses are hardy for your zone, once they become established and if they are on their own roots, they really shouldn't need "protecting". if they are grafted, you may want to still mound a little soil over the bud union, as that seems to be a sensitive spot.
if you put burlap on the canes you could water the burlap a little on the warm days, would hold some moisture, and if it froze would remain until it got warm enough to melt and provide some moisture. also may help keeping the rose from coming out of dormancy prematurely.

Athens, PA

Thank you so much for your replies. I went to the store last night and now I am armed with rolls of burlap, twine and newspapers. The weather this weekend is supposed to be miserable, but I would like to get these roses taken care of for the coming months.

Lent - I had not thought about watering the burlap a bit on warm days, but it makes sense.

I have seen some gorgeous pictures of climbing roses on this thread and can only hope that mine are a nice and gorgeous when they become established.

Carolyn

Des Moines, IA(Zone 5a)

Thanks for the Climing rose info - I'll replace the leaves with dirt & add burlap as well.

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or register to post.

Upload Images to your reply

    You may upload up to 5 images
    BACK TO TOP