At last...some April bloom!

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

And Goldenfish, I like the mottling/spots on the anemone foliage, and nice color on the pulsatilla flower, too.

It should be time for our native Snow trillium and Pasque flowers to be blooming in the wild now. I hope I find time to visit them this year.

Yesterday, I was poking around and doing some spring cleaning at our Arboretum rock garden. Some snow drops and a few crocus were blooming. Corydalis solida and Jeffersonia dubia were starting up. The drabas were hardly doing anything, but they are in a cooler part of the garden.



This message was edited Apr 15, 2008 9:45 PM

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

One of my beds with the snowdrops thawed today and the snowdrops were literally blooming under the snow. Corydalis solida were also a couple of inches high under the snow. It is suppose to get warm (13 C) on Thursday, Friday and saturday so maybe I'll see significant snow melt.

I getting an order together for Beavercreek this week..I see more Lewisia in my immediate future! Roger also offers Callianthemum...I've been looking for that one for years! Funny, he does not offer any saxifrages at all! Never heard of an alpine nursery that didn't. Alpines Mont Echo which was my primary source for saxes and now they are gone. Wrightmans' is charging way too much for them. I did loose a couple of Kabschia so far this winter (from whats melted out) but so far I only lost S. paniculata 'Cartiliginea' among the encrusted...I'm delighted that my S. longifolia made it...hopefully I'll know more of who lived and who died by the weekend.

Rick, I have 15 Leibnitzia from the seed you sent and 8 Hesperis kotchyi...they just got potted individually today.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

I rode my bike to work on Monday and on the way home, stopped to enjoy hundreds of Anemone patens in full bloom. (The semi-natural park I ride through is largely grassland river valley slopes. Got home just as the snow and rain started... which reminded me of why I usually wait a couple more weeks before starting to ride... )

Great minds, etc.! I just sent orders off to Beaver Creek and Wrightman's on Sunday evening, so am very excited. This will be my first order from Wrightman's... I admit I did get sucked in by a couple of the pricier saxifrages! (And DH brought home 1600 lbs of stone today... if you recall our attempt last fall at a crevice bed for alpines, you'll be relieved to know that we're adding on to it, which should make it look much less like Farrer's proverbial dog's grave, LOL! Lots of room to put all those purchases... and the seedlings in the basement... and the winter sown ones... and... )

Re. Mont Echo no longer doing mail order... notwithstanding that, a colleague at work is apparently being sent Cyclamen purpurascens from there, after simply making an inquiry about them some time AFTER the notice was posted about the end of mail order. Note that this is with never having ordered from them before or with any previous association with them. Very strange, I thought, but perhaps if you ask, Todd?

This message was edited Apr 15, 2008 8:33 PM

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Oops! I meant Corydalis solida (sometimes I'm a bulbosa head).

Todd, did the L. nepalense sprout too? That genus always seems to be a late spring starter for me for mature plants in pots and in the garden. Not a speck of life in them right now. So far, the biggest alpine surprise is Veronica armena, in a large plastic bowl. After two years of it seeming to struggle, it did a little better last season, and looks absolutely pristine in the full sun setting all winter (under the snow) and spring. At this moment, it has a very nice maroon hue to the evergreen foliage. I hope that is normal! BTW, the only things that resisted the mouse predation the winter before in that bowl was that and Saxifraga crustata.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Veronica whitleyi is evergreen and takes on a strong purple winter colour, so perhaps V. armena is the same? (I don't grow it so can't say with any certainty.)
Lori

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

We have V. armena at our BG and I must admit it looks just like V. whitleyi...at least enough that I can't tell them apart.

Rick, only one L. nepalense germinated, the rest are the andina.

Glad to see someone is having an early spring! Normally I see the patens blooming in Calgary in early May so you sem to be a couple of weeks ahead of schedule.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Well... May seems a little late.... On the prairies here and where I grew up, they're typically in bloom at or close to Easter, e.g. April 8th last year, April 12th next year. (NB: Easter was unusually early this year). By May, there are usually only the stragglers left, in the area I go through. Back at home, where the snow could sometimes be heavy, timing was more variable.

This message was edited Apr 16, 2008 5:17 AM

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Perhaps I should have said: "it should be time for our native Snow trillium and Pasque flowers to start blooming."' No early spring here. Normally it's about April first for these plants.

I remember the first time I saw Trillium nivale in the wild. I knew it grew in a certain 25 acres (10 ha.), but had no clue where to look when I drove there to hunt for them. It seemed so weird that something would be growing, let alone blooming, while everything else hasn't even broken their winter buds. Anyway, I give myself a pat on the back, since I had no trouble finding the little colony. Just think like a snow trillium: where would I be, blooming when there is still snow left on the ground? Where it is warmest, of course: on a rock ledge the juts out from the hill.

Bloom time is a month long, which, when you take into consideration the temperature, isn't remarkable at all. By the end of that time, other efemerals are emerging enough so you can watch where you step, hepatica blooms are well on their way, as are a few of the Dutchman's breeches in the area. Wild ginger sprouts are an inch (2.5cm) long.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

The first clumps of Pulsatilla vulgaris are starting to bloom... these early ones are, in reality, quite an intense purple (darker than the photo seems to show), but my camera doesn't quite capture it for some reason.

I see buds (edit: not bud clusters) on the little Claytonia megarrhiza I planted last year!



This message was edited Apr 17, 2008 8:12 PM

Thumbnail by altagardener
St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

My megarhiza died :(

Not a gig in my Pulsatillas yet. But my Eranthis are out!

Thumbnail by Todd_Boland
Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

See how screwed up (I mean different) climates can be?

I am USDA zone 4
Trillium nivale and Pulsatilla patens should be blooming
P. halleri in my warm garden is 2 inches high, buds won't color for another week+
P. vulgaris a tad behind
P. turczaninovii has broken bud, but no height gain

Alta is in Canada(?) zone 3b, that would be like USDA zone 4a-4b
her Pulsatilla vulgaris is blooming!

And Todd, well, his climate is just an enigma.

An internet friend and I have tracked two willow species' bloom for two springs now - Salix chaenomeloides and S. koriyangi. He is zone 5-6 West Virginia, I am zone 4 Minnesota. For him, koriyangi blooms first. For me, chaenomeloides blooms first.

somewhere, PA

Anemonella Thalictroides is blooming...

Thumbnail by Tammy
somewhere, PA

And Daphne Lawrence Crocker is loaded and ready to go.
First bloom to emerge

Thumbnail by Tammy
Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Bad picture of Hepatica transsilvanica... (I realize I usually dramatically misspell the species name.... saw too many vampire movies as a kid I guess). The flowers are actually much bluer than this... dang camera!


Flowers are starting to open on my Pulsatilla alpina, as well as on Hymenoxys grandiflora (now Tetraneuris grandiflora, I guess). There's also a flower tucked in to the base of a Caltha leptosepala, but it looks so nondescript compared to the ones I see in the mountains, that unless it improves greatly, I'll spare you guys the photo!

Thumbnail by altagardener
St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Better protect eveything Alta, you are expecting a major freeze! No temps above freezing for 4 days at least and nights down to -15 C! YIKES! And I thought I had a bizarre climate...mine is just consistently blah.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Hey, no worries, Todd... I'll just press the button to activate our new "Hail Master" plexiglass yard shield...
LOL!
(It would be a wonderful thing... some summers, most of our precipitation seems to come in solid form.)

Wow, love the daphne, Tammy! Some species are supposed to do okay here, but I'm doubtful they'd do so well as in your photo.

Rick, very interesting about the lycoris... I'd been wondering about those lately - can't remember what bit of reading set me off. I've never been able to keep the difference between Canadian and US zones straight.... it seems that the new(?) US National Arboretum
map puts us at 3B (possibly 3A)? I can't zoom in on the Canadian part to really pin down our location! (The current Canadian one puts us at 3A, 2B on the NW edge. ) Oh well, it is what it is!

This message was edited Apr 18, 2008 12:31 PM

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

And I now have more Lycoris radiata poping up in a different garden. But I haven't seen them bloom yet. I received them in a trade last year from Texas, and they aren't blooming size. But she sent me a pic of them, and they are definitely radiata.

Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

And that does it! One of the oldest members in our NARGS chapter grows a lot of Hepaticas, inculding transylvanica, but I have never been over at the right time. This spring, I am going to get over there then.

Now let's see if I really do . . . .

somewhere, PA

Sanguinaria Canadensis multiplex... are there OK for Rock & Alpine?

Thumbnail by Tammy
somewhere, PA

Mystery plant... it sure looks like something I'd plant deliberately
but I don't recall planting it nor do I recognize it. I'll be posting it on
plant ID forum too.

Thumbnail by Tammy
Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

That would be Cardamine concatenata, formerly Dentaria laciniata.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Dang, you beat me by 3 minutes, Rick! (Plus my answer over at the ID forum was peppered with question marks, so it doesn't count as strongly, LOL!)

somewhere, PA

wow! I'm gonna have to go around finding more mysteries for you two to
solve. LOL

St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

Tammy, I have both of those plants but my Sanquinaria is just peaking above the soil....it will be early June before they bloom. And my cardamine has never bloomed...had it 10 years now..I expect it will go in the compost heap this year.

Yesterday hit 16 C...today's high is 0 C..isn't spring lovely!

I do have my first true alpines open despite there being 2 feet of snow over half the back yard. Saxifrage oppositifolia blooms within days of melting snow.

Thumbnail by Todd_Boland
St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

and the first Kabschia...S. sancta 'Macedonica'

Thumbnail by Todd_Boland
St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

and last is my native Salix jejuna...it is a Newfoundland endemic and one of the world's tiniest willows. It is in my trough so I could manipulate my black cardboard to accentualte the minute 2 cm catkins!

Thumbnail by Todd_Boland
Tottori, Japan(Zone 9a)

Tammy,

Your Sanguinaria is awesome. I've never seen the real one because there are
not so many people who grow Sanguinaria in Japan. I heard that the flower period
is very short. What a shame such beautiful flowers are out of bloom so quickly.

Todd,

Your true alpines are adorable whenever I see. Salix jejuna is really cute. I like it very
much!

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

Yes, isn't spring lovely...
Well, it was up until yesterday, LOL! Supposed to climb to -1 deg C by Wednesday... at least there is that nice insulating blanket of snow!

Thumbnail by altagardener
Saint Bonifacius, MN(Zone 4a)

Actually even though the species Sangunaria canadensis bloom time is short, the cultivar Multiplex's bloom time is comparatively long because the flowers are sterile.

Todd, that willow is sweet!

The Cardamine grow wild here and carpets much of the open forest floor is this part of the county. But it seems where brush of any kind grows, cardamine does not. Still, it is a very sparse bloomer. The type that grows here has flowers that hardly open, even on sunny days.

somewhere, PA

Todd & Rick - what a contrast to what we've got here! I just spent the
afternoon mowing the very quickly growing grass.

The sax oppositofolia has such beautifully vivid purple/blue flowers. Yum

Tottori, Japan(Zone 9a)

Epimedium diphyllum. Some leaves are variegated.

Thumbnail by goldenfish
Tottori, Japan(Zone 9a)

Houstonia caerulea. These small flowers are very sweet!

Thumbnail by goldenfish
St. John's, NL(Zone 5b)

My Houstonia flower in July! Long wait I'm afraid. My Kabschia are showing more colour in the buds but we are suppose to stay cold all week so they are in suspended animation.

somewhere, PA

Daphne Lawrence Crocker finally getting close to a peak... its just
loaded this year.

Thumbnail by Tammy
North East England, United Kingdom(Zone 8a)

My double sanguinaria is about 2 feet across now so if you have room go for it - it is one of the highlights of my garden. This is how it looked yesterday.

Thumbnail by Galanthophile
somewhere, PA

glorious! I love those. And it looks like you've made yours very happy.

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or sign up to post.
BACK TO TOP