Happy Thanksgiving!

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

Hoping all of you have a wonderful day filled with gratitude that you can share with family and/or friends!

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

Happy Thanksgiving to my new friends on the Rocky Mountain forum! Have a lovely day!

Brenda

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Happy Thanksgiving back, and to everyone else.

Santa Fe, NM

Hi to you all and happy post Thanksgiving!

Thumbnail by roybird
Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

What a beautiful turkey, roybird!

Santa Fe, NM

It is a very delicious turkey, too! We got a local one this year, from Embudo, rather than an organic one. They cost about the same. I think the local turkey was more flavorful.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I know where you can get a local organic turkey -- from a lady at our farmers' market. She also sells fresh chickens and guineas from time to time, and eggs, if you get there early. Her name is Barbara Mann and she is active in the Iris Society and the Herb Society as well -- I have her email address next time you need a turkey. She farms in Stanley, NM.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

We got a Hutterite turkey but ate it instead of photographing it... ;-)

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Are the Hutterite birds to die for?!?!? I'm a huge Hutterite chicken fan too.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I have never heard of a Hutterite bird. Are they chickens? Sounds scrumptious, I have to say.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Hutterites are a religious colony http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hutterite They grow everything organically and bring their produce and fowl to markets here. In a nut schell - fresh chicken and turkey.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Yum. That is the best kind. We have a lady here who does that but she doesn't belong to a religious community. Since we go out for Thanksgiving I haven't tried one of her turkeys but I would if I were cooking! They are supposed to be delicious.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

The worst turkey I ever had was organically grown, but it was not anything inherently wrong with the turkey. This sincere but wacky lady invited my daughter and me to Thanksgiving dinner around thirty years ago before organic was popular.

She went to enormous efforts to acquire an organically grown turkey for dinner and then was utterly perplexed about what would be the "healthy" way to cook it. I am sorry to say she BOILED it.

Well, it was memorable. And she was a very nice lady.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

How to destroy a turkey in 3 easy steps. Ouch. I've made a couple bad cooking decisions too. Its just bad to do it on a big day.

I think I may try one of the Hutterite (or similar) Turkeys next year. I went with the $0.29 a lb bird at the grocery. It was good, but perhaps a little too juicy.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

LOL I've never tried boiling a turkey. Has anyone tried deep fried turkey? It was the rage here about 10 years ago. You just plopped the whole turkey in a big deep fryer. It was too greasy for my tastes. I still want to try John Madden's turducken. I think you need to have a big group to eat it all though.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

I've never wanted to try a deep-fryed bird. The fryers are great though. They are the cheapest 7 gallon pot and propane burner to be had on the market. Perfect size for brewing beer.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Go dparsons go! I brew up liqueurs in my caldron for festive occasions.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

:)

What kind of liqueurs? How do you brew them?

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

IGrand marnier is my fav but I like the creme de menthe too. I cook them in a caldron on a gas stove but I bet a deep fryer would work fabby for a big batch. Receipes are pretty basic http://www.recipezaar.com/Homemade-Grand-Marnier-191348 http://www.grouprecipes.com/58403/homemade-creme-de-menthe-liqueur.html

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Dahlianut, you have the wildest adjectives. :) Those recipes look quite easy. I'm quite tempted on the Creme de Menthe as I easily have that much mint sitting in my front yard right now. I don't think I'd want to do 5 gallons of the sugar-water though. I can't see myself with 15 gallons of Mint liqueur sitting in the closet.

Santa Fe, NM

L.O.L.! A boiled turkey! That's the kind of thing I need to hear. Plus 15 gallons of mint liquor in the closet. I made lavender liquor one year. I may still have some about, probably in a closet. It took tons of sugar or else it was too medicinal. By the way, it ends up that our local turkey was organic after all. I got confused. Ah, well. I have been eating turkey mole' with leftover turkey and frozen mole' sauce. This is what turkey needs! Otherwise I get bored with it. Like ham.

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

LOL, a boiled turkey! Obviously, memorable. My brother used to deep fry turkey, it was delicious, but those fryers scare me... I've seen too many newscasts of fires caused by them. In one, the fireman was showinghow to put the turkey in safely, and the whole dang thing exploded into flames! Turned out to be "How NOT to Fry a Turkey"!

Brenda

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Turkey mole is superb. You are very lucky to have that for your leftovers. We may have a turkey for Christmas -- because no restaurants are open on Christmas day, that I can ever find -- other than the fast food places. In which case I will make turkey mole, after the first day. Too bad Trader Joe's discontinued its mole sauce. It was excellent.
I have boiled turkey for soup -- the carcass and a leftover bits. Makes a great soup with carrots and celery and potatoes and just about anything else you like. Boiling a whole turkey would make way too much soup.
A great thing to do with turkey parts -- we rarely buy a whole turkey but like the thighs -- is to flour it, brown it in oil, then add enough water to come up halfway up the side of the meat, some onions and celery and simmer an hour or so,covered. Then in the last 30 minutes add potatoes in pieces and celery in slices or pieces. Makes a delicious pot roast and doesn't remind you too much of the holidays.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I have never eaten a deep fried turkey, but I hear they are wonderful. But you are right, Brenda about the danger. Justin Wilson's cookbook recommends cooking them under a big oak tree with spreading branches. Tie a rope to the basket holding the turkey and throw it over a branch in the tree. Stand far away and pull or slowly drop the rope to let the basket come out of or into the fat. That sounds safe for humans, but perhaps not for the oak tree. Anyhow one of his cookbooks features the picture of this apparatus and I think it would be fun to try.
But I also hear that brined turkey is the best. I don't plan to cook any more turkeys -- because we are all happy going out, but if I did, I would brine it. And I would buy an organic turkey from my friend in Stanley, NM.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

There is also a danger if the Turkey is still frozen of getting an explosive reaction and throwing oil out of the fryer (which then may catch on fire). I'd want to use a steel basketball pole rather than risk lighting up an Oak tree.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Oh dear, dparsons. Your statement reminds me of a joke I heard that may actually be true. It is told by people who work in weapons testing. It seems the Brits heard about an American piece of test equipment -- a gun that would fire chickens at airplane windows to see if they were strong enough not to break if a bird flies into them. They sent them the gun and the Brits were very chagrined when their windows broke ever single time they shot a chicken at it. So they wrote to the guys who invented the gun and asked what they were doing wrong. The Americans wrote back and said:

First thaw the chicken!

This must be Brit bashing day.

Santa Fe, NM

Large vats of boiling oil make me nervous. People generally like anything deep fat fried, though. Every once in awhile I'll have a donut but that's about the only thing I eat like that, good as they may be. The whole turducken thing also makes me nervous! Too much going on!

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I have always been leery of Turduckens myself. The question is why? Each is so good roasted on its own with lots of air circulation. So even though I was raised in South Louisiana where Turducken was invented -- I have never tried one. I hear you have to cook them all day.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

I've heard a much quicker cook time. I personally don't care too much as I don't plan on trying it. I have enough fat in my diet.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I completely agree about fat in one's diet. I actually have been on a vegan diet for about 6 months now due to rising cholesterol and blood sugar. But I do eat meat on special holidays like my birthday and Thanksgiving. I will no doubt have meat on Christmas as well.
So I may dream of deep fried turkey, but I haven't been trying to locate any. But if one were handy I would try it. But I would only have a few bites.

Santa Fe, NM

I would try it. I would try turducken, too. I would try just about anything once! However, after the holidays I may go vegan for awhile. It seems like a great way to lose weight and still get plenty of food. Of course, I would cheat from time to time. Is chocolate vegan?

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

I'm pretty sure chocolate is totally vegan! You go girl! Oh, wait, maybe it depends if there is milk in it... anyone???

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Chocolate is a food group. You need to eat some every day or you will get very, very sick and maybe die.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Yes, as a vegan you can have chocolate but not milk chocolate. But I agree with Dahlianut's prediction, if you don't eat chocolate you will die! Didn't anyone ever tell you that chocolate is a vegetable!

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Yes its a vegetable and you need a 5 oz. serving a day. More if it has milk or butter in it.

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

LOL! Got my ration in for the day!

Brenda

Santa Fe, NM

Glad to hear the good news! This morning I made Kevin put my box of chocolate covered almonds way up high in a cupboard, so I'll have to stand on a chair to get to them. My other chocolate is still on the counter, but it is more healthy, and wrapped up so you have to go through a process before eating it.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

'Unwrapping' uses up 5 calories so be sure to factor that if you're calorie conscious. Eating uses up 3 calories. Drooling -1 calorie/drool. This is important stuff to know.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

And don't forget that the almonds in your chocolate are a good vegan food, too!

Santa Fe, NM

I had better eat some before i go to my class tonight!

Post a Reply to this Thread

You must log in and subscribe to Dave's Garden to post in this thread.
BACK TO TOP