the new greenhouse

Stevensville, MT(Zone 4b)

thinking of a heated concrete floor, heated by a boiler out in the barn, any thoughts or comments(we need to perform a heat loss first)

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Tillaging and Rooting:

Gotta post a picture on fruit tree progress. Finished up the tillaging part yesterday and will put the trees in the ground tomorrow to start rooting. I added a good long-term dose of minerals to the whole area and some compost and mixed it all in. This area of the yard seems to have some of the better soil so that is good too.

Thumbnail by dparsons01
Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

My brother in law is building a large greenhouse with a buried water tank under the floor that is hot water heated in the floor. I think that is how he is setting it up, have not seen it since he got it to that stage.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Heat and some insulated walls help too wendyloo. This translates into 2 layers of plastic to create an air gap most commonly. Mine has fancy double-layer extruded polycarbonate. You can also make a framing system that allows you to put on two layers of plastic sheeting that are separated by a gap.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

A heated concrete floor sounds great to me. It is nice in houses, so why not in greenhouses.
Oh, by the way, I heard a terrifying story about concrete floors with heat in them. The plumber who put in my new furnace told me they were seeing that in some of the older systems the copper tubing touched the concrete and caused a chemical reaction of some sort and so water began leaking out of the floor! I guess they don't use copper tubing any more, but apparently mine has copper tubing. I knew that nice warm floors were to good to be true.
I actually have a friend who had to move to an apartment because that was happening in her house. She has no idea when it will get fixed.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

That sounds like a daunting propect, paj.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

It sounds totally impossible. Please, pray for my plumbing. It hasn't happened to me. I certainly hope it doesn't.

Santa Fe, NM

I think I mentioned that same problem happened to a good friend of mine. The floors and walls of her house had to be removed and redone. That took about a year. She and her husband lived in their studio, which fortunately, had a kitchen, bath, and bedroom. The problem had to do with the house being built on rock, as well as the copper pipe, etc. Passive solar sounds good to me!

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Guess, I brought this up before -- sorry. You can tell I am worrying.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

I bet you are! But the only thing you could do is either sell the house before it happens or just live with it. Tough choices.

Or could you have it fixed in advance? What would that involve?

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I don't even know if it will happen so I think I will stick my head in the sand. The deal is that they are supposed to cover the copper tubing with soil before they put the concrete down. Apparently some contractors weren't very careful about that so they spring a leak everywhere the copper tubing touches the concrete. I guess I will just cross my fingers and hope it doesn' t happen. I love the house and DH would probably have a cow if I suggest another move. He and his side of the family just don't believe in moving. This is wierd from me since my parents were always building a bigger and nicer house and moving on, but in DH's family moving is akin to a death in the family! I don't get it.

Stevensville, MT(Zone 4b)

Thanx for all your input.....please tell your friend who has the copper tubing being replaced to keep it and sell it....can make ALOT of money. The plumbers keep it and they sell it!! Don't let them take it for free! My husband was a regional manager for tubing(plastic) and has heard many many stories for example. A school was switching over to plastic tubing for their heat, said just to throw away the copper. The plumbing contractor made 40,000.00 dollars. Realize her house is not as big as a school, but she should not give the copper away! sorry, off the track here

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Interesting, though. So far I am okay.

Stevensville, MT(Zone 4b)

pajaritomt.......if you would like.....dmail me about your pipes...not selling you anything, but as I said my husband WAS a regional manager for tubing(for North America)...I can ask him

This message was edited Jan 19, 2009 11:27 AM

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Thanks, will do.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Got the fruit trees planted in the back yard. 1 peach (O'Henry), 1 plum (Italian Prune), and 1 pear (Bartlett). Ian (my 11 year-old son) help me plant them today.

I named the trees Henry, Prunus, and Bart. Ian initially didn't like the idea of naming the trees, especially Prunus for the plum tree. He doesn't like prunes so much as plums. I explained to him that the Italians likely use a Latin derivative and that Prunus was the Latin name meaning plum. Once I told him that Latin was the language of the Romans and that Italy was the seat of the Roman empire making our Plum tree of Roman origin, he was fine with it. He's been playing the "Civilization" computer game and has been quite impressed with the Romans. So we have a Roman Plum tree named Prunus. :)

I did take pictures but my camera went all wiggy and they didn't come out. New camera time? I hope not.

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

Nice, dparsons, and I love the naming of the trees! Well done teaching your son while planting, you know that is one of those things he will most likely aways remember! How old is he?

Brenda

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

He is 11. I'm also thinking that having worked on them and in getting good fruit from them he will take some ownership of the trees and treat them well.

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

Awwww... I remember when my son (now 27) was 11... and I wish we had had a garden. Nonetheless... he's an awesome young man, but I think the gardening thing adds so much. (We lived in condos and apartments while he was growing up). What a blessing to be able to share that with him!

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Growing food is one of those basic survival things that so many people have lost contact with in our society. Its nice to be able to teach him some of that.

Santa Fe, NM

I like that you named the trees. Eleven is a good age. Not a teen-ager yet though the media has started calling children from, apparently, 5 to 12, "tween-agers". Probably to define a market group. Maybe they will decide to plant fruit trees instead!

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

How wonderful that you named your trees and you son participated with the planting dparsons. All is good when a family shares the care of growing things. LOL now we will wait for the time when he starts to give you instructions on how to feed and prune them ^_^

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

LOL dahlianut. Him giving me instructions isn't so far from the truth. He has a sense of "how things should be" and will speak his mind if they aren't. It just requires a little guidance on when it is or is not appropriate.

Helena, MT(Zone 4b)

"prune" is French for "plum"
"prune sèche" is French for "prune"
"raisin" is French for "grape"
"raisin sec" is French for "raisin"

And those Romans, yes, they had a different word for everything, too. Except "tempus fugit" was the same.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Those prune plums are delicious and many varieties of them grow well in New Mexico. Grapes, too.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

I was wondering about the English use of plum/prune for fresh and dried forms of the fruit. Perhaps the word prune came about from importing the dried fruits?

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Very likely. That isn't such an uncommon way for things to be named. Take the case of grama grass. Grama means grass in Spanish, but to us it means a certain kind of grass.

Helena, MT(Zone 4b)

I have a maple named Deborah, clematises named Ernest and Betty, a rose named John, ...

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Any reasoning for your naming picante, or just what inspired you.

Helena, MT(Zone 4b)

The rose is a John Cabot.
The clematises are Ernest Markham & Lady Betty Balfour.
The maple is Acer platanoides 'Deborah'. She's new, and I can't wait to see her leaf out, because she's supposed to leaf out red, and then turn slowly green.

They don't seem to mind that I call them by their first names. Although Ernest gets fungal every year, darnit. I think the fungus came from the nursery, as my neighbor had the same problem with a clematis from that place.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

I have names for many of my plants because I talk and sing to them all the time. I call my 'John Cabot' 'Sheets' because he is used for bedding by my leaf-cutter bees. Bummer picante I've never got a fungus on clematis. I guess you've tried every foliar application in the book? I did have the scary 'wilt' on my 'Madame Julia' Coveron (never called just plain 'Julia' but always 'Madam Julia') when I first bought her but I seems like I've conquered it and no sign last summer (fingers and toes crossed). Pics please of your new maple. I so want a JM 'Pixie'.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I would love a nice maple that turns bright red in the fall. I don't have room for one though unless I remove something else. Probably I would do better with an oriental maple that doesn't grow very tall.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

I'll tell Ian about your singing dahlianut. I was joking with him about singing to our trees as well and he didn't think that was something people did.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Singing to trees?

It is definitely what some people do and it is a good habit to get into. There was a book in the 70's that recommended talking to your plants. How could singing not be better than talking? Maybe you should sing to your trees and he will copy you. After 13 years as a school teacher and a whole lot more years as a person, I can tell you people do as you do, not as you say. Singing lessons, dparsons?

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Mostly I do my own singing. It's especially important for germination and seedlings I find. Note though that my tomato seeds and seedlings adore Aerosmith so I give them a ghettoblaster blast in the indoor growop. I tried to grow trilliums one year and sang campfire songs to foster a 'woodland' feeling but unfortunately it was to no avail. Most of my plants and woodys like my talking and singing though. I think its also important to hug your old tired trees that are reaching the end of their life but don't tell Ian that cuz that's probably a tad too out there. Perhaps start with humming? You never know, Ian might be a natural plant whisperer.

This message was edited Jan 21, 2009 7:36 PM

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I am quite sure that with your modeling Ian will develop his own methods for plant communication both in words and in song. This will guarantee that he will be an addicted gardener. You are raising him right. I like the idea of starting with humming. No use scaring the poor kid to death right off the bat!

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

LMAO no kiddin paj! Way too funny!

Helena, MT(Zone 4b)

Dnut, I haven't tried every foliar application because I'm not very savvy about them. I've tried Serenade Solutions, which has Bacillus subtilis, a biofungicide. And Soap Shield, a copper-based fungicide. Then there was hydrogen peroxide solution (sprayed it and watered with it), garlic juice, cornmeal (supposed to be anti-fungal).

I have no idea what would work. Ernest grows very tall every year, gets beautiful flowers, and slowly turns brown from toe to head. He's still blooming when he's all brown. Here he is still green.

Thumbnail by picante
Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

O Ernest is very prettiful. I had Botrytis in 2002 on a group of asiatic lilys. Since I inherited them with the house and fungus is very uncommon here, due to our dry climate, I didn't catch on to it for awhile. I lost that clump but I did save the others that showed sign of infection with a powder copper-based fungicide so I think you are on the right tract. I still have it so I will wade out to the shed tomorrow and tell you the specific product I used. I will report back. Might make a snow angel on the way to the shed too ^_^

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

I took singing lessons pajarito - a voice class while I was in college. I went to every class, practiced, worked hard, and got a C+. Not my gift. Ian seems to be quite musically gifted though, so I do encourage him to pursue that.

I did emulate talking to the trees. I welcomed each of them to their new homes. I let them know of my idea to give them food, water, and a nice spot in my yard in exchange for thier fruit to see if they were agreeable to that plan. So far so good.

I did not know that Tomatoes were fond of Aerosmith.

Post a Reply to this Thread

You must log in and subscribe to Dave's Garden to post in this thread.
BACK TO TOP